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When it comes to EV's, it's all about the batteries.

Here is a video from several years ago demonstrating the automation that LG Chem uses in the production of their automotive cells. I believe this was for cells used in the Chevy Volt.


The new battery plant in Ohio, at 30 GW, will produce enough cells for 300,000 Lyriqs each year (based on 100 kWh battery pack). The follow-on plant in Tennessee will produce an equal amount.

With larger cells and lower Cobalt content, it will be interesting to find out how much cost they have taken out of the previous generation of batteries.
 

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.....The only thing that could potentially hurt the costs is when the countries that produce the materials for the batteries start to realize the damage all the mining is doing to their land and they no longer want to play nice.
They're not likely to care about the damage they're doing. They'll just raise the prices because they realize that they have a hot commodity.

If they do bow down to the political pressure from their mining damage, they'll just open up a new mine a couple miles away that follows all the best practices, approved by everybody. But that mine will only run on "press day", and the old mine will run on the other 364 days.
 

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They're not likely to care about the damage they're doing. They'll just raise the prices because they realize that they have a hot commodity.

If they do bow down to the political pressure from their mining damage, they'll just open up a new mine a couple miles away that follows all the best practices, approved by everybody. But that mine will only run on "press day", and the old mine will run on the other 364 days.
Very possible. It’s just a bummer having to rely on other countries for our power. I’m sure these minerals will eventually be found in other parts of the world but time will tell. Hopefully in Nevada right next to a battery company and in the vast desert. ;)
 

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Problem is that as EV's gain in popularity production will knock against a hard wall of limited supply of the minerals needed for the batteries. Then there is the hard wall of not enough electricity production to charge all of them.
The minerals needed are actually quite widespread across the earth. The problem is they're messy to refine - which is why China, with lax standards of environmental protection, leads in their production. The Chinese are just willing to accept the mess, so they can undercut the rest of the world. But as these minerals get more important, that will change. We'll put the money into producing them cleanly elsewhere, and China will be left in the dust, with all the mess they've made over the years at home.

The one exception I know of is cobalt, which is mined in Africa under terrible conditions using a lot of child labor. But cobalt is getting worked out of battery formulas quite rapidly.
 

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The minerals needed are actually quite widespread across the earth. The problem is they're messy to refine - which is why China, with lax standards of environmental protection, leads in their production. The Chinese are just willing to accept the mess, so they can undercut the rest of the world. But as these minerals get more important, that will change. We'll put the money into producing them cleanly elsewhere, and China will be left in the dust, with all the mess they've made over the years at home.

The one exception I know of is cobalt, which is mined in Africa under terrible conditions using a lot of child labor. But cobalt is getting worked out of battery formulas quite rapidly.
Wow so it is all rainbows and butterflies, at least eventually.
 

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The minerals needed are actually quite widespread across the earth. The problem is they're messy to refine - which is why China, with lax standards of environmental protection, leads in their production. The Chinese are just willing to accept the mess, so they can undercut the rest of the world. But as these minerals get more important, that will change. We'll put the money into producing them cleanly elsewhere, and China will be left in the dust, with all the mess they've made over the years at home.

The one exception I know of is cobalt, which is mined in Africa under terrible conditions using a lot of child labor. But cobalt is getting worked out of battery formulas quite rapidly.
add in western countries have a -not-in-my-backyard mindset VS a "communist" government that can dictate what and where
 

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The minerals needed are actually quite widespread across the earth. The problem is they're messy to refine - which is why China, with lax standards of environmental protection, leads in their production. The Chinese are just willing to accept the mess, so they can undercut the rest of the world. But as these minerals get more important, that will change. We'll put the money into producing them cleanly elsewhere, and China will be left in the dust, with all the mess they've made over the years at home.

The one exception I know of is cobalt, which is mined in Africa under terrible conditions using a lot of child labor. But cobalt is getting worked out of battery formulas quite rapidly.
It's like cotton.

Before the US Civil War, the American south was the world's main source of cotton. It's not that that was the only place to get cotton, it was that the American south had a huge pricing advantage. They didn't pay their workers (slaves).

Follow the money.
 

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That's like the pot calling the kettle black. They both have their downsides, so pick your evil.
I beg to differ, I don't think you can call petrol evil unless you would prefer living in the mid 19th century vs. the 21st. Petrol made the 20th century, and the vast strides in Western Civilization, possible. Otherwise, no cars, coal power locomotives and ships and powerplants, sounds like nirvana.
Thanks to Orange Man Down, the USA became energy self-sufficient for the first time in a long long time. Major strategic importance. That's petrol at work.
The greens, who are actually reds, mostly have no idea what they're talking about because they've been absolutely spoiled by the perks of Western Civilization, and rendered thoughtless by the brain-drilling of the electricity-deluded..

The first oil corporation, which was created to develop oil found floating on water near Titusville, Pennsylvania, was the Pennsylvania Rock Oil Company of Connecticut (later the Seneca Oil Company). George H. Bissell, a New York lawyer, and James Townsend, a New Haven businessman, became interested when Dr. Benjamin Silliman of Yale University analyzed a bottle of the oil and said it would make an excellent light. Bissell and several friends purchased land near Titusville and engaged Edwin L. Drake to locate the oil there. Drake employed William Smith, an expert salt driller, to supervise drilling operations and on August 27, 1859, they struck oil at a depth of sixty-nine feet. So far as is known, this was the first time that oil was tapped at its source, using a drill.

Titusville and other towns in the area boomed. One of those who heard about the discovery was John D. Rockefeller. Because of his entrepreneurial instincts and his genius for organizing companies, Rockefeller became a leading figure in the U.S. oil industry. In 1859, he and a partner operated a commission firm in Cleveland. They soon sold it and built a small oil refinery. Rockefeller bought out his partner and in 1866 opened an export office in New York City. The next year he, his brother William, S. V. Harkness, and Henry M. Flagler created what was to become the Standard Oil Company. Flagler is considered by many to have been nearly as important a figure in the oil business as John D. himself.


 

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I beg to differ, I don't think you can call petrol evil unless you would prefer living in the mid 19th century vs. the 21st. Petrol made the 20th century, and the vast strides in Western Civilization, possible. Otherwise, no cars, coal power locomotives and ships and powerplants, sounds like nirvana.
Thanks to Orange Man Down, the USA became energy self-sufficient for the first time in a long long time. Major strategic importance. That's petrol at work.
The greens, who are actually reds, mostly have no idea what they're talking about because they've been absolutely spoiled by the perks of Western Civilization, and rendered thoughtless by the brain-drilling of the electricity-deluded..

The first oil corporation, which was created to develop oil found floating on water near Titusville, Pennsylvania, was the Pennsylvania Rock Oil Company of Connecticut (later the Seneca Oil Company). George H. Bissell, a New York lawyer, and James Townsend, a New Haven businessman, became interested when Dr. Benjamin Silliman of Yale University analyzed a bottle of the oil and said it would make an excellent light. Bissell and several friends purchased land near Titusville and engaged Edwin L. Drake to locate the oil there. Drake employed William Smith, an expert salt driller, to supervise drilling operations and on August 27, 1859, they struck oil at a depth of sixty-nine feet. So far as is known, this was the first time that oil was tapped at its source, using a drill.

Titusville and other towns in the area boomed. One of those who heard about the discovery was John D. Rockefeller. Because of his entrepreneurial instincts and his genius for organizing companies, Rockefeller became a leading figure in the U.S. oil industry. In 1859, he and a partner operated a commission firm in Cleveland. They soon sold it and built a small oil refinery. Rockefeller bought out his partner and in 1866 opened an export office in New York City. The next year he, his brother William, S. V. Harkness, and Henry M. Flagler created what was to become the Standard Oil Company. Flagler is considered by many to have been nearly as important a figure in the oil business as John D. himself.


I know that, I was just using it as a reference point to counter the other post. ;)
 

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Petrol made the 20th century, and the vast strides in Western Civilization, possible.
+1
That includes lithium-ion batteries, which are based on intercalation chemistry research that Dr. M. Stanley Whittingham perfected when he worked at the large petroleum company known today as Exxon Mobil Corporation in the 1970s.
 

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.... Petrol made the 20th century, and the vast strides in Western Civilization, possible. ...
Well of course, nobody is denying that.

The horse made the 19th century civilization possible. And before that, all we had was our own feet. Do you advocate not advancing civilization? (that would explain the "Neanderthal" name)
 

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Well of course, nobody is denying that.

The horse made the 19th century civilization possible. And before that, all we had was our own feet. Do you advocate not advancing civilization? (that would explain the "Neanderthal" name)
Ouch. You So Cruel. ;)
 

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Well of course, nobody is denying that.

The horse made the 19th century civilization possible. And before that, all we had was our own feet. Do you advocate not advancing civilization? (that would explain the "Neanderthal" name)
Central Planning does not typically advance civilizations. It does centralize control and contribute to corruption.

If these lektriks evolved naturally, by market demand and supply, that's a different story.

You don't know much about neanderthals either, do you? What are you, a cro magnon?
 

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I recall Neanderthals going extinct because they were too intellectually inferior to adapt and the superior homo sapien breed did so quite successfully. History has repeatedly demonstrated when a group or species clings to long held practices and beliefs in the face of a changing world, it doesn't work out well for them.
 

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Central Planning does not typically advance civilizations. It does centralize control and contribute to corruption.

If these lektriks evolved naturally, by market demand and supply, that's a different story.

You don't know much about neanderthals either, do you? What are you, a cro magnon?
I'm not quite that old.

Are you saying the petroleum industry evolved naturally?
 
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