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Ok, do you think Canada, or even the Northern United States, don't have Homeless?

Water lines won't freeze @55 F Inside your Home, leave the water running if you were worried about outside freezing, but the lines would need to be Above Ground to freeze within a few days.

Business have been closed for Covid up this way for the last 2-3 weeks, everyone survived. Where is it that you Have to Go, if the roads are not plowed of the 5"s of snow? A legitimate question. I snow plow, which means many early mornings, 4am. You would be surprised how many Elderly People are out at that time, stuck in unplowed Intersections. I use to stop and push them out, until I realized, they would only make it to the next Intersection and get stuck again. Where do they have to go at 4am? Coffee at Mc Dee's.

It all seems like a Mad Panic over a basic winter storm, we endure 2-3 times a month every winter. Or week long Heatwaves we get through in the summer months.

Rolling Blackouts, well that is just your Power Grid, and whoever wasn't prepared or wished to profit the most from this. 12,000-15,000 BTU AC Unit, would use as much, or more energy as a Space Heater trying to warm up a home. Where is all that Summertime Energy?

Our Ancestry's use to live in Caves, was the Weather that much more uniformed then?
Apparently you are tone deaf. The state, counties, cities, and people completely unprepared for a once in 100 year event. 11 year old boy dies of hypothermia, Older man found dead frozen to death in his e z chair. Wife near death in ICU, critical condition. Horror stories abound.
I lived in Michigan for many years. Learned to cope and had cold weather/snow resources at every level. In Texas, a completely different set of conditions. But with Michigan experience I fared better than most. For everyone else not used to northern winters, complete disaster. Sorry you don't get that.
 

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Apparently you are tone deaf. The state, counties, cities, and people completely unprepared for a once in 100 year event. 11 year old boy dies of hypothermia, Older man found dead frozen to death in his e z chair. Wife near death in ICU, critical condition. Horror stories abound.
I lived in Michigan for many years. Learned to cope and had cold weather/snow resources at every level. In Texas, a completely different set of conditions. But with Michigan experience I fared better than most. For everyone else not used to northern winters, complete disaster. Sorry you don't get that.
The thing is though that it does happen and it does happen enough that they ought to have resources available just in case. I know they do around here, maybe not much so to speak considering, but they do have it. :)
 

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The solar panels and wind mills don't take to kindly to big ice storms, hmmm. who'da thunk.
they worked as well as GAS power plants with NO gas and frozen cooling ponds
IMHO I have heard the wind mills worked BETTER then the GAS plants that were NOT "winterized"
the failure is not of the TYPE but for unprepared infrastructure
Canada and Norway all use wind AND solar generation BUT it is winter HARDENED by design
in Canada GAS meters freeze up and water mains freeze / burst and that is NORMAL and expected and most importantly prepared for
we have electric water mains thawing rigs that drive power through frozen water mains to thaw them out and get notices from the city to run your water during "extreme" weather events
hydro has a fleet of herman nelson heaters they will attach to your houses rear door and pump heat in in an emergency
these are ALL tools that SHOULD NOT be "normal" in Texas but IS in Canada
I do not believe it is lack of "hardiness" on texans but an EXTREME event they are ill suited to
 

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Suck it Up Buttercup!

Frig, we have been enduring -30-50F temps the past week and a half. No shutdowns. Except School Busses don't run at -35C (without the Windchill) but they run at -45C with the windchill.
Ha! Though I bet your area would get shut down with extented 115 degree days that Texas can easily handle.
 

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they worked as well as GAS power plants with NO gas and frozen cooling ponds
IMHO I have heard the wind mills worked BETTER then the GAS plants that were NOT "winterized"
the failure is not of the TYPE but for unprepared infrastructure
Canada and Norway all use wind AND solar generation BUT it is winter HARDENED by design
in Canada GAS meters freeze up and water mains freeze / burst and that is NORMAL and expected and most importantly prepared for
we have electric water mains thawing rigs that drive power through frozen water mains to thaw them out and get notices from the city to run your water during "extreme" weather events
hydro has a fleet of herman nelson heaters they will attach to your houses rear door and pump heat in in an emergency
these are ALL tools that SHOULD NOT be "normal" in Texas but IS in Canada
I do not believe it is lack of "hardiness" on texans but an EXTREME event they are ill suited to
I did just half jokingly/half seriously say above I bet a string of 115 days in Canada will shut the country down, something Texas can handle with no issue. As you said, it's all about what is normal for a region and when Mother Nature throws a curve ball, there are problems. Sure, Canada can build in a lot of extra air conditioning capacity in buildings and beef up the electric grid to handle it for that once in a lifetime event, but is it worth it?
 

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I did just half jokingly/half seriously say above I bet a string of 115 days in Canada will shut the country down, something Texas can handle with no issue. As you said, it's all about what is normal for a region and when Mother Nature throws a curve ball, there are problems. Sure, Canada can build in a lot of extra air conditioning capacity in buildings and beef up the electric grid to handle it for that once in a lifetime event, but is it worth it?
I will not speak for the rest of Canada. In Quebec we also rely on electricity for a good part of the heating during winter. We are 8.5 million and the local company can provide peak power of 37.5 GW. If we add the external suppliers we could go up to 44 GW. Most of us have a backup heat source. For me it's a propane fireplace.

Texas has an installed capacity of 120 GW for a population of 29 million. It is quite comparable if we look at the available power per capita. The major difference is that here the kWh costs us at most $ 0.0938 Canadian, or 0.0744 USD . And the profits go back to the public.

I have a brother-in-law who is a truck driver. His usual route leads him to the large dams of James Bay. When he has to sleep in his truck over there he let the engine run. He has already seen -49 C. Which makes -56 F.
 

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Discussion Starter #49
Ha! Though I bet your area would get shut down with extented 115 degree days that Texas can easily handle.
115F would be uncomfortable to say the least. And in the Heat, I usually head to the Cabin, where there is No Air Conditioning, or power for that matter. Swimming would be a Must.

The same Cabin I stayed at last week in -31F temps. A wood fire that took 4 hours to warm up the Cabin to 60F. Nobody Froze in their Easy Chair. and going there was a Choice. I could have easily stayed home and turn up the Electric Furnace. Added another blanket and stayed in Bed. A bet that there will be a lot of Belly Bumps showing up this summer from the Cold Snap.

A Cold Snap, it is a Choice to venture out, -79F with the wind Snowmobiling was a Choice that I made. I payed for that Choice. Life Threatening? I doubt it.

It was a 1981 Blizzard 7500. And yes, a Main Jet falling out was strange, but it happened, the Gas was Super Cold on the hands!
 

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The thing is though that it does happen and it does happen enough that they ought to have resources available just in case. I know they do around here, maybe not much so to speak considering, but they do have it. :)
Happen enough?
This was a once in one hundred year event. Building codes in Texas do not take freezing weather into account when running water lines. So pipes very vulnerable to freezing and bursting.
Snow almost never accumulates more than an inch. So why stock up on snow plows? Salt trucks would be a waste. Been in Texas 14 years. Never needed a snow shovel till last week...so I should have known better? Texas has its own stand-alone power grid so could not tap into other states power systems to address the problem.
Fact is, there have been 74 deaths in the US due to winter storms this season. 38 of those were in Texas last week.
All that said, energy companies in the state do need to winterize generators/transformers so never again will millions be without power for days while temps in the teens.
 

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Happen enough?
This was a once in one hundred year event. Building codes in Texas do not take freezing weather into account when running water lines. So pipes very vulnerable to freezing and bursting.
Snow almost never accumulates more than an inch. So why stock up on snow plows? Salt trucks would be a waste. Been in Texas 14 years. Never needed a snow shovel till last week...so I should have known better? Texas has its own stand-alone power grid so could not tap into other states power systems to address the problem.
Fact is, there have been 74 deaths in the US due to winter storms this season. 38 of those were in Texas last week.
All that said, energy companies in the state do need to winterize generators/transformers so never again will millions be without power for days while temps in the teens.
Oh please, these so called once in a hundred year events seem to happen much more frequently that that parameter any more.
 

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Is everybody prepared for a 7.5+ magnitude earthquake in their area? No. Because they don't happen in most people's areas. Only areas with frequent earthquakes prepare for those types of events. Same thing happened here. People in Texas don't have backup heat for extreme cold because it "never" happens. If we all adequately prepared for 1-in-100 year events we'd be living in bunkers underground and everything would cost twice as much.

Our power grid was not prepared for this extreme cold. All sources failed to some degree. People are already calling for changes for the future to be better prepared. Not sure it it'll be worth the investment or not. Maybe individuals will be more prepared next time and not be so dependent on the government to help all the time.
 

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Is everybody prepared for a 7.5+ magnitude earthquake in their area? No. Because they don't happen in most people's areas. Only areas with frequent earthquakes prepare for those types of events. Same thing happened here. People in Texas don't have backup heat for extreme cold because it "never" happens. If we all adequately prepared for 1-in-100 year events we'd be living in bunkers underground and everything would cost twice as much.

Our power grid was not prepared for this extreme cold. All sources failed to some degree. People are already calling for changes for the future to be better prepared. Not sure it it'll be worth the investment or not. Maybe individuals will be more prepared next time and not be so dependent on the government to help all the time.
My area can get category 3 hurricanes, very infrequent, and we are NOT prepared for one. However, it's almost impossible to do so. The trees in New England simply can't handle that kind of wind and a ton will fall. It is simply too costly to cut down all trees that are within 75 feet of the electric poles (so 150 feet combined for each side of the pole). I have a generator and a ton of gas cans, ready for the day. Hopefully, a tree doesn't fall on my house...
 

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Maybe individuals will be more prepared next time and not be so dependent on the government to help all the time.
If there's any good that comes out of the weather events affecting the Southern USA last week, it's that more people realized that "government help" is an oxymoron and took action on their own to address the situation at hand.

Here in the Memphis area, there were numerous examples of neighbors helping neighbors get through the challenges presented by the winter storm. I'm sure the same was the case throughout the Southland.
 

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If there's any good that comes out of the weather events affecting the Southern USA last week, it's that more people realized that "government help" is an oxymoron and took action on their own to address the situation at hand.

Here in the Memphis area, there were numerous examples of neighbors helping neighbors get through the challenges presented by the winter storm. I'm sure the same was the case throughout the Southland.
I think people need to take ownership of their life too. Think about the size of this event, even if the government mobilized the entire armed forces to help, it would still take days for that help to arrive. And it's not like there are set plans for every type of contingency. People have to realize there aren't millions of government representatives sitting around waiting to provide assistance. And the logistics of such a huge event are massive! Like you said, neighbors need to help each other, otherwise there might not be official help for awhile!


That's not to say that the government shouldn't have regional disaster plans. They certainly should and have efficient logistics systems ready to go.
 

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Oh please, these so called once in a hundred year events seem to happen much more frequently that that parameter any more.
I might suggest you do a lookup on the last date that all of Texas had 6 consecutive days where high temps were in the 20s or lower along with 5" of snow or more.
 
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