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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I went out to dinner last night with a friend, and man alive, he just would NOT shut up about the Volt... car of the future and what not.

Assuming GM can get the technology to work, this is going to be a pretty remarkable shift in the way we think about cars... powered primarily by electricity instead of an ICE. It opens up a whole realm of possibility as to what can power our cars, being as the ICE is only there to charge the battery. Gasoline, natural gas, hydrogen... anything that can get an ICE to turn, we can power the batteries with.

Let's assume it costs $30,000 after tax credits, and will go 40 miles on battery life alone.

So, who here is going to buy a Volt when they hit showroom floors, with those specs? And if not, what would you change about the Volt to make it appealing enough for you to buy?
 

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First of all, why would you say IF they get it to work? They've gotten it to work. The hard part is getting it to buyers at a price they can afford.

I personally will not buy a Volt. I do not have the need for one in the near future and am not that concerned with environmental concerns or fuel prices. We'll see in a few years how the economy goes and how well the vehicle is priced, how well it performs, and how much room the vehicle actually offers before I consider one.
 

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There's way too few details about that vehicle for me to commit this early. It's amazing that people would or could.....but hey it's easy to "say" I'll buy one than to actually do it.
 

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I still would not buy it because of the “initial cost” of out-of-pocket. The new Honda Hybrid “initial cost of $19K” looks more promising.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
First of all, why would you say IF they get it to work? They've gotten it to work. The hard part is getting it to buyers at a price they can afford.

I personally will not buy a Volt. I do not have the need for one in the near future and am not that concerned with environmental concerns or fuel prices. We'll see in a few years how the economy goes and how well the vehicle is priced, how well it performs, and how much room the vehicle actually offers before I consider one.
Price and reliability is what I mean. Ford already has Edges running around the country with a system like this (Lithium ion battery, engine used as a range extender), so the technology obviously works.

Again... work off my assumptions, folks. Assume you will pay $30,000 for a reliable Volt that goes 40 miles on electric.
 

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I definitely will purchase one...I drive 45 miles to work and back (plus sitting in rush hour traffic jams), not to mention what I drive after I get out of work. I have a small car right now but I am actually seeing a difference in what I spend for gas.

Still nothing to complain about, Haven't spent over $46 bucks for gas every week and I am still getting 32mpg hwy.

If it will perform the way it should and the price point is right, I will be filling up 46$ bucks a month instead of a week.
 

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I would not buy a Volt at $30,000+. It's just too much money for me to spend on a 'commuter car'. When the next model comes out and the prices drops into the twenties then I would consider it.
 

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Weekending Salutations Wescoent:

As I am sure you know by now, I am a person that doesn't like limitations. Here in SOCAL, a 40 mile trek, is often less than an evenings out. Also I am in line for my Mercury Mariner Hybrid, that is selling like hotcakes ( ok, the Ford Escape version). At the $40K price point, I would not purchase any Chevrolet product (the exception would be a Corvette, if someday I wanted one).:cool:

My main consideration is: Technology implimentation. I want to wait until the technology is; proven, reliable, and less costly. FORD, is producing so many Hybrids that I am as comfortable with buying one as I would be a Toyota! Also Ford is selling Battery pack options, and as I have stated, I must have options!

Sorry for being so long winded, but I am rather passionate about my vehicle choices, and how I spend my well deserved profits.:yup:.

:drive:

Take Care,
 

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This looks set to replace one of our cars in 2 or 3 years time. My dad also plans on buying one.

And why this over a $20k Honda hybrid? Because it's cooler, that's why. Hybrids will be so old school when this comes out that those who want the "in" car will buy a Volt. Watch for all of California to be trading in their Priuses for a Volt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Weekending Salutations Wescoent:

As I am sure you know by now, I am a person that doesn't like limitations. Here in SOCAL, a 40 mile trek, is often less than an evenings out. Also I am in line for my Mercury Mariner Hybrid, that is selling like hotcakes ( ok, the Ford Escape version). At the $40K price point, I would not purchase any Chevrolet product (the exception would be a Corvette, if someday I wanted one).:cool:

My main consideration is: Technology implimentation. I want to wait until the technology is; proven, reliable, and less costly. FORD, is producing so many Hybrids that I am as comfortable with buying one as I would be a Toyota! Also Ford is selling Battery pack options, and as I have stated, I must have options!

Sorry for being so long winded, but I am rather passionate about my vehicle choices, and how I spend my well deserved profits.:yup:.

:drive:

Take Care,
I agree with you on the Chevrolet comment. Even at $30,000, it's hard for me to think about owning a product with the bowtie on it, and dealing with Chevy dealer service.

The idea of a Buick Electra, based on the Volt, but with much richer trim, and a somewhat better dealer and service experience sounds more appealing to me.
 

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I wouldn't personally buy one. Besides the lack of details about the car It's also a little too compact for my needs. Also I know it probably won't be cheap to replace the batteries when the time comes to change them
 

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I will not based on what form I expect the car to take: An otherwise uninteresting car. I have no problem with the bowtie, and I am aware of one good local Chevy service department. However, I will be surprised if it ends up being anything but a boring sedan, drivetrain tech notwithstanding. Same reason I was never particularly attracted to the concept of owning Prius or Civic hybrid; I'm just not in that market.

On top of that, I expect the Audis in my current fleet to last quite a while, so it will be hard to justify a $30K non-necessity whose primary attributes are practicality & high MPG.
 

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I wouldn't at 30K. It would actually cost money since I only have a 24 mile round trip commute. I'll probably buy a Yaris for half the price. Fifteen thousand dollars will buy me a lot of fuel.
 

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I agree with you on the Chevrolet comment. Even at $30,000, it's hard for me to think about owning a product with the bowtie on it, and dealing with Chevy dealer service.

The idea of a Buick Electra, based on the Volt, but with much richer trim, and a somewhat better dealer and service experience sounds more appealing to me.
Good Day Again Wescoent:

I really respect your thinking, just let me add to the name: Buick Electra 240 (for VOLTage). If GM hired persons like you, that have the ability to think on their feet, they would have their problems; dealt with and solved. :yup:

Yes, there will be fierce price resistance for Chevrolet, but $40k for Buick, no problem...Provided they make it a Buick product, with all the amenties and Buick's reknown quality.

Again Great thinking,

:drive:
 

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GM will probably dole out the initial production only to Hollywood celebrities and other opinion leaders. It might be two or three years before it's even in the dealerships.
 

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If the design isn't bland, the interior is well executed, and it hits the stated 40mi range, I'll very strongly consider one at ~$35k. I can't commit to buying one since other manufacturers haven't said what they'll have by 2011.

A Volt won't replace either of our current vehicles, but I want one just for the heck of it! :D

My main consideration is: Technology implimentation. I want to wait until the technology is; proven, reliable, and less costly.
Given battery supply constraints, the Volt should be fine with just early adopters as buyers the first couple of years. By the 3rd year or so is when it'll start appealing to price-conscious consumers and "appliance" buyers.
 

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Given battery supply constraints, the Volt should be fine with just early adopters as buyers the first couple of years. By the 3rd year or so is when it'll start appealing to price-conscious consumers and "appliance" buyers.
EMH:

Be more considerate of others: I spent $106,700 within the last 9 years with GM. Today what's the wholesale value?

When you put money, where your .... is talk to me!:rolleyes:

:drive:
 

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EMH:

Be more considerate of others: I spent $106,700 within the last 9 years with GM. Today what's the wholesale value?
Didn't mean to offend you, and I appologize if it came across that way. I was making a general comment, not specific to you, about those who want the technology to mature and get cheaper. There's nothing wrong with that approach -- different strokes for different folks.

When you put money, where your .... is talk to me!:rolleyes:
And I did put my money where my (whatever you want) is -- I spent $50k on a GM product 3 years ago. I knew that resale value would go down quite a bit but I bought it because I liked it. I don't buy a car unless I can handle 100% depreciation on it...
 
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