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I have been trying to research this but haven't come up with any resuts? Have there ever been Caddy V10s? I am sure there have been but I don't remember them...
 

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I don't know of any caddy v10 engine. They had v12's (on the cien and others). Given the compact size of the v10 compared with the 12, I believe that the sts-v is more likely to receive a 10 instead of 12...
 

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in the 30's they used to make v16's... talk about HUGE...

I like this caddy, but fwd??? I bet that if it was a highway, you could do a burnout from here to Sweden-hehe-
 

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Cadillac has never offered a V-10 powered automobile.


The 1st 1903 Cadillacs were single cylinder cars, late by 1905 Cadillac introduced a 4 cylinder model, by 1915 Cadillac upgraded to a V8.

Then, in 1930, Cadillac wowed the world by introducing a 452 cid V-16 and a 368 cid V-12.

These were beautiful OHV engines making 165hp and 320lb ft of torque at 1200 rpm for the V-16 and 135hp for the 12 cylinder models.

The OHV V-12 and V-16 models ran through 1937, when the V-12 was dropped and the V-16 was replaced with a L-head re "flathead" V-16 which made 185hp and displaced 431 cid.

This V-16 ran from 1938 to 1940.

The orginal 1930 V-16 series cars were priced from $5350 to $9200, in 1930! When a Ford was about $300!

Cadillac continued with the L-head V8 through all this time and it stayed with it after the V-12 and V-16 engines were gone.

In 1949 Cadillac introduced the modern OHV V8. This V8 was sold in a variety of different displacements all the way up to the 429 cid V8 that was introduced in 1964.
In 1968 Cadillac replaced the tried-and true 429 with an all new mamoth 472 cid V8 that produced 375 gross hp and 525 lb ft of torque. Cadillac made the 472 a little larger in 1970, making it the legendary 500 cid 8.2 litre monster V8, standard in the Front Wheel Drive Eldorado, this engine made 400 gross hp and 575 lb ft of torque!

The 500 cid V8 was exclusive to the Eldorados through 1975, when it replaced the 472 V8 in all regular Cadillacs, like the DeVille and Fleetwood series cars, except for the Seville which had a Fuel Injected 350 V8 made by Oldsmobile.

The 500 ran through 1976, in 1977 it was replaced with an all new smaller 425 cid V8.

It's interesting to note that due to the change from SAE gross to SAE net horsepower ratings in 1972, and then the increase in emissions regulations and goverment intervention, the mamoth Cadillac 500 cid V8 was rated at 190 NET hp and 215 NET hp with optional Fuel Injection by 1976. Torque was 360 lb ft at 2000 rpm.
 

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very informative: I liked most this:
"The orginal 1930 V-16 series cars were priced from $5350 to $9200, in 1930! When a Ford was about $300!"

In simple words, if you want the competition to hate you, drop a big caddy under the hood:
BIG AND MEAN
that intake screams business :eek:
 

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V10s have never really made sense. People want cars with nice round numbers of cylinders, preferably factors of 2 - especially when they're arranged in a V.

Two banks of 5 cylinders just don't seem right.
 

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All I have hurd is rumers of a V10 (based on the OHV SB Chevy V8's) that would be used on the next gen. Slade. These rumers keep persisting so it looks like it may really happen at some time in the future. PS-I had a 69 Sedan Deville with the 472 and it would smoke the rears for nearly a block. I cant belive I traded that old beater for a THREE WEELER! :huh: The things KIDS do. :(
 

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No doubt....the Cadillac 472 was an awsome, smooth monster motor. The standard 375hp makes easy work of moving those massive 4800-5000lb Cadillacs. What I find funny is that Cadillac had the 3rd most powerfull car made in the US in 1970, at the peak of the muscle zenith.

1-Chevrolet 454 LS-6 V8- 450hp
2- Dodge/Plymouth 426 HEMI V8- 425hp
3- Cadillac 500 V8- 400hp
 

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Yeah.....it also would have to do with the 575lb-ft of torque running through the front tires! :p

The 1967-1970 Eldorados are classics, though I preffer the 1967-1968 versions with the hidden headlights, the styling is cleaner.
 

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This is sort of related since we are talking about GM front-drive in the 60's and 70's...

When the new Torondo came out in 1986, I remember a magazine (MT, I think) got their hands on a '66 Toronado and drove it to see what they were like 20 years prior. They said even with a 7-liter V8 with FWD, there was no torque steer. You could hardly tell which end was being driven. They concluded that GM should have taken a closer look at that car when they designed the X-cars.
 

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Yes the weight of the whole car, plus the fact that the E-bodies still have the engine sitting in the traditional "north-south" position as opposed to the X-cars transverse layout with a transaxle, this helped keep torque steer down. The E-bodies did not get transverse engines and transaxles until the "big-shrink" of 1986. It's also interesting to note that in 1966 and through 1976 the Oldsmobile Toronado, Buick Riviera and the Cadillac Eldorado in 1967 all shared the E-body platform, even though the Riviera was RWD, the Riviera was no longer an E-body when it was re-designed in 1977, it then used a version of the LeSabres B-body platfrom, but the Riviera returned to the E-body and became FWD in 1979.


I have a 1978 Eldorado Biarritz, and though the hp was down to 180hp by 78, the 425 V8 stll has 325lb ft of torque at about 2200 rpms! I am a big fan of the 1971 to 1978 giant "showboat" Eldorados too.
 

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Why dont they build Arks. like that today that can be eather FWD or RWD with SLITE MODS on the factory production line? They say you cant make all the people happy all the time but THAT would be a ((GREAT START))!! Allso does enyone know if the old LH Chrysler cars with there "NORTH SOUTH" engine placement had mutch torque steer?
 

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It wasn't exactly the longitudinal or transverse placement of the engine as much as it was the length of the half-shafts. Unequal length half shafts contribute greatly to torque steer. Longitudinally mounted engines have the transmission mounted toward the middle of the car and make it easy for equal-length half shafts to power the front wheels. Transverse engines have the transmission mounted at one end of the engine, so the length of the half shafts depends on where the output shaft is located. As FWD development improved, the output from the transaxle on these cars was centered, providing room for equal-length half shafts.

Cars with longitudinally-mounted engines and FWD included (but aren't limited to) the aforementioned GM E/K-bodies (don't forget the first FWD Seville), Chrysler's LH (and the Eagle Premier/Renault 25), Honda Vigor/Inspire/Acura Vigor/TL (first two generations), Honda/Acura Legend/RL, first-generation Toyota Tercel, Datsun F10 Cherry, all four- and six-cylinder Subarus, Saabs before the 9000 (99/early 900 used the "South-North" mounting), early Lancias....etc.
 

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Originally posted by Hudson@Apr 23 2004, 05:25 PM
It wasn't exactly the longitudinal or transverse placement of the engine as much as it was the length of the half-shafts. Unequal length half shafts contribute greatly to torque steer. Longitudinally mounted engines have the transmission mounted toward the middle of the car and make it easy for equal-length half shafts to power the front wheels. Transverse engines have the transmission mounted at one end of the engine, so the length of the half shafts depends on where the output shaft is located. As FWD development improved, the output from the transaxle on these cars was centered, providing room for equal-length half shafts.

Cars with longitudinally-mounted engines and FWD included (but aren't limited to) the aforementioned GM E/K-bodies (don't forget the first FWD Seville), Chrysler's LH (and the Eagle Premier/Renault 25), Honda Vigor/Inspire/Acura Vigor/TL (first two generations), Honda/Acura Legend/RL, first-generation Toyota Tercel, Datsun F10 Cherry, all four- and six-cylinder Subarus, Saabs before the 9000 (99/early 900 used the "South-North" mounting), early Lancias....etc.
((OK)) I get what your saying but I would just wonder one thing? How is it that caddy NOW can build there FWD NS powered models (WITH MORE TORQUE) then eny FWD competiter yet have (LESS TURQUE STEER) then those cars? It must be that they use equal length shafts even with there crosswise engine placement?
 
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