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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
EPA: Average fuel economy goes up in U.S.
(Washington , D.C. - Sept. 19, 2008) For the fourth consecutive year, EPA is reporting an increase in the average fuel efficiency for cars and light duty trucks, to a projected 20.8 miles per gallon (mpg) for 2008. This year's projection is a 0.2 mpg up tick over last year's value.
Americans Driving Less
June 2008 Traffic Volume Trends

Travel on all roads and streets changed by -4.7% (-12.2 billion vehicle miles) for June 2008 as compared with June 2007.
Travel for the month is estimated to be 250.2 billion vehicle miles.
Cumulative Travel for 2008 changed by -2.8% (-42.1 billion vehicle miles).
Increased fuel economy + fewer miles driven =

U.S. Total Gasoline All Sales/Deliveries by Prime Supplier -6.4% in June 2008 compared to June 2007. source
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Here is another chart I came across. It shows engines have been getting more efficient (horsepower divided by displacement) since 1976. National average fuel economy has been increasing since 2004.

 

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Now if we could just get a better E85 infrastructure in place, we could further reduce demand.

In itself, this is fantastic news. Problem is, it is buffered by the fact that China and India's consumption is still rising. The news I am waiting to hear is when China and India report lower consumption rates - but with both economies still growing a or near double digit rates, I doubt we'll be hearing this kind of news anytime soon.

OPEC and Russia still have us over the barrel for the forseeable future.

At least in this country, I think the public has passed the threshhold of conscience petrol consumtpion - meaning that if oil/gasoline prices drop, we won't suddently see a shift back to gas guzzling vehicles. I believe the American consumer is now economy minded - thus incenting the manufacturers to produce even efficient SUVs, trucks and Crossovers.

EPA: Average fuel economy goes up in U.S.


Americans Driving Less


Increased fuel economy + fewer miles driven =

U.S. Total Gasoline All Sales/Deliveries by Prime Supplier -6.4% in June 2008 compared to June 2007. source
 

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Here is another chart I came across. It shows engines have been getting more efficient (horsepower divided by displacement) since 1976. National average fuel economy has been increasing since 2004.

Great two posts.

My guess is that a torque versus FE chart would be just as or even more impressive - although harder to usefully present.

When you factor in the strong progress on emissions - its quite an accomplishment - virtually unimaginable in the '70s and early '80s.

Darn shame from '98 forward we didn't trade a little HP for FE (but kept the torque) - or ......better yet , a wider range of combination s - with some other varying variables that matter - like weight..

Notice the effects of Acura, Infiniti, and Lexus being introduced .
 

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Now if we could just get a better E85 infrastructure in place, we could further reduce demand.

In itself, this is fantastic news. Problem is, it is buffered by the fact that China and India's consumption is still rising. The news I am waiting to hear is when China and India report lower consumption rates - but with both economies still growing a or near double digit rates, I doubt we'll be hearing this kind of news anytime soon.

OPEC and Russia still have us over the barrel for the forseeable future.

At least in this country, I think the public has passed the threshhold of conscience petrol consumtpion - meaning that if oil/gasoline prices drop, we won't suddently see a shift back to gas guzzling vehicles. I believe the American consumer is now economy minded - thus incenting the manufacturers to produce even efficient SUVs, trucks and Crossovers.


Well, that could be a good thing. Lowered demand here with continued demand elsewhere should help keep prices lower then ridiculous ($4.00 a gallon) while not dipping too low as to encourage reckless consumption again. That would be a good happy medium, and hopefully we'll continue to see people who don't need large vehicles moving into smaller ones which should help keep demand from growing.
 
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