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Knowing how competent the 1st generation Volt was from the get-go, and the notable improvements made on the 2nd generation, I could only imagine that the 3rd generation would have been even more remarkable once the existing energy-dense Ultium battery capacities were factored into any final product.

But we'll never know. And it's a missed opportunity.

There are plenty of folks who would argue that there's no reason for GM to pursue any ICE-based hybrid vehicles now that their full EV products are on (or coming to) the market. There is a sliver of truth there, but I would disagree.

While there's plenty to admire technologically from the raft of EVs on the horizon, it does not take much imagination to see how such products (as impressive as they are) cannot replace every ICE-powered vehicle on the market. Even if the entire consumer base bought into the idea, there aren't enough mines and raw materials to make such a shift in the span of a decade (or two). That aside, there will always be customers who do need an ICE-powered vehicle. Why not address their range anxiety (or related logistical- and infrastructure-issues) in offering a hybrid to such buyers?

The obvious take away here is, what is Toyota (and a handful of other manufacturers) seeing on the playing field in keeping their hybrid offerings in tact, that GM does not? Are the soothsayers at the RenCen more adept to future market conditions than Toyota is?

Of course, perhaps neither is "wrong" or "right" in such prognosticating. Each could have merit in pursuing their individual strategies. However, IMHO, I can't help but wonder if some outfits are making product decisions by bowing to the social pressure that comes with how they wants to see the coming market landscape; while others are more pragmatic in how it is likely to be.
If GM still made the Volt or a 3rd generation, THAT would be the ONLY vehicle on my "next car" list. Period.

A low-slung, rakish Trax-ish inspired 3- door and 5-door sporty wedge with Ultium batteries and a direct injection, Atkinson-cycle 3 cylinder with a 60 mile EV range, returning 50+mpg in range-extending mode, possibly with e-AWD as an option. And bring back the 2+2 seating.
 

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Toyota is the typical Japanese company. It is run by old men who are too conservative to see what is happening in the market. It reminds me of another Japanese company, Sony. Sony who invented the walkman should have been the company to invent the IPod. It didn’t and the rest is history. Sony made the best televisions. Now they buy their Oled displays from LG.

Toyota builds the best hybrid cars. Certainly not everyone will buy a BEV car, range issues being the primary reason. Ford has already said it will require only 40% of its current workforce to build all electric cars. Yes right now batteries are expensive, but the price is rapidly declining just as technology always does. Building hybrids means Toyota will be stuck with too many workers and installing two engines in each car. That does not sound like a very good plan long term. Plus hybrids still emit greenhouse gases. Yes EVs will require significantly more electricity generation, but over time mankind will produce the electricity needed in a more carbon neutral way.

Love him or hate him but Tesla showed the way to the future.
I love Nikolai Tesla, and yes, he did show the way to the future. Too bad he died penniless.
 
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