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Toyota debuts surprisingly stunning next-generation Prius in global reveal
It'll still clog up the left lane when you need it least, but at least it'll look great doing it
CHRIS TEAGUE
Nov 16th 2022
autoblog.com

The Toyota Prius may have kickstarted the hybrid vehicle revolution in this country, but it has never been an exciting or attractive car to look at. That’s changing with the upcoming next-generation Prius, and the new car sports a sleek look with stunning lines, as we can see from Toyota's global reveal ahead of its U.S. debut at the L.A. Auto Show.

Toyota is announcing the new car with the theme of “Hybrid Reborn” and says that the next Prius will deliver engaging driving performance. To do that, the automaker installed a new 2.0-liter plug-in hybrid powertrain that produces 220 horsepower. Stunningly, the plug-in Prius has a swift 0-60 mph time of 6.7 seconds. At the same time, the EV range is improved by around 50 percent, and Toyota placed the battery pack under the back seat instead of in the cargo area to enhance interior space.

The hybrid Prius gets an available 2.0-liter powertrain that makes 193 horsepower, which is 1.6 times better than the outgoing hybrid. The upgraded powertrain also receives a revised all-wheel drive system that uses an electric motor to drive the rear wheels. Toyota notes better low-traction performance in snow and ice and promises better performance in turns.

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Looks really solid, and kudos to Toyota on making it more attractive and upscale looking.

Seeing this, and knowing that there is still a market for such products, makes one think that perhaps abandoning a dedicated hybrid in the Volt in favor of jumping entirely into the EV market was a bit premature. As the brass at Toyota has stated in other notable articles, the amount of battery material used in one EV could be applied to eight (or more) hybrid vehicles. Knowing that there is not a one-sized-fits-all solution to consumers' transportation needs, I'd be interested in seeing how this new Prius performs in the market --- and if other automakers revisit their hybrid strategy.
 

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abandoning a dedicated hybrid in the Volt in favor of jumping entirely into the EV market was a bit premature.
+1
Second gen Volt trounced Prius Prime in terms of engineering and design. Sadly, one can only dream of how impressive a third generaton Volt would have been, given GM's extremely premature cancellation of that technology. 😢
 

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+1
Second gen Volt trounced Prius Prime in terms of engineering and design. Sadly, one can only dream of how impressive a third generaton Volt would have been, given GM's extremely premature cancellation of that technology. 😢
Indeed. GM has a bit of self-destructive/self-limiting gene somewhere. Kill something that's the cat's meow. Be first on the market with an EV1 that seats two. Eh? Just where is the demand for two-seaters? Other than Corvettes and Miatas that is. Sometimes GM just needs a few teenage boys running things to make them work right.
 

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Wow, as much as it pains me to say this, I like it.

Interesting that they are repositioning the Prius. I'll be following to see if the repositioning from the "I'm green" image to a youthful sporty vehicle works. I'm taking this as Toyota signaling that hybrids are yesterday's news and no longer the "I'm green" vehicle of choice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
abandoning a dedicated hybrid in the Volt in favor of jumping entirely into the EV market was a bit premature.
+1
Second gen Volt trounced Prius Prime in terms of engineering and design. Sadly, one can only dream of how impressive a third generaton Volt would have been, given GM's extremely premature cancellation of that technology. 😢
Knowing how competent the 1st generation Volt was from the get-go, and the notable improvements made on the 2nd generation, I could only imagine that the 3rd generation would have been even more remarkable once the existing energy-dense Ultium battery capacities were factored into any final product.

But we'll never know. And it's a missed opportunity.

There are plenty of folks who would argue that there's no reason for GM to pursue any ICE-based hybrid vehicles now that their full EV products are on (or coming to) the market. There is a sliver of truth there, but I would disagree.

While there's plenty to admire technologically from the raft of EVs on the horizon, it does not take much imagination to see how such products (as impressive as they are) cannot replace every ICE-powered vehicle on the market. Even if the entire consumer base bought into the idea, there aren't enough mines and raw materials to make such a shift in the span of a decade (or two). That aside, there will always be customers who do need an ICE-powered vehicle. Why not address their range anxiety (or related logistical- and infrastructure-issues) in offering a hybrid to such buyers?

The obvious take away here is, what is Toyota (and a handful of other manufacturers) seeing on the playing field in keeping their hybrid offerings in tact, that GM does not? Are the soothsayers at the RenCen more adept to future market conditions than Toyota is?

Of course, perhaps neither is "wrong" or "right" in such prognosticating. Each could have merit in pursuing their individual strategies. However, IMHO, I can't help but wonder if some outfits are making product decisions by bowing to the social pressure that comes with how they wants to see the coming market landscape; while others are more pragmatic in how it is likely to be.
 

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Knowing how competent the 1st generation Volt was from the get-go, and the notable improvements made on the 2nd generation, I could only imagine that the 3rd generation would have been even more remarkable once the existing energy-dense Ultium battery capacities were factored into any final product.

But we'll never know. And it's a missed opportunity.

There are plenty of folks who would argue that there's no reason for GM to pursue any ICE-based hybrid vehicles now that their full EV products are on (or coming to) the market. There is a sliver of truth there, but I would disagree.

While there's plenty to admire technologically from the raft of EVs on the horizon, it does not take much imagination to see how such products (as impressive as they are) cannot replace every ICE-powered vehicle on the market. Even if the entire consumer base bought into the idea, there aren't enough mines and raw materials to make such a shift in the span of a decade (or two). That aside, there will always be customers who do need an ICE-powered vehicle. Why not address their range anxiety (or related logistical- and infrastructure-issues) in offering a hybrid to such buyers?

The obvious take away here is, what is Toyota (and a handful of other manufacturers) seeing on the playing field in keeping their hybrid offerings in tact, that GM does not? Are the soothsayers at the RenCen more adept to future market conditions than Toyota is?

Of course, perhaps neither is "wrong" or "right" in such prognosticating. Each could have merit in pursuing their individual strategies. However, IMHO, I can't help but wonder if some outfits are making product decisions by bowing to the social pressure that comes with how they wants to see the coming market landscape; while others are more pragmatic in how it is likely to be.
If GM still made the Volt or a 3rd generation, THAT would be the ONLY vehicle on my "next car" list. Period.

A low-slung, rakish Trax-ish inspired 3- door and 5-door sporty wedge with Ultium batteries and a direct injection, Atkinson-cycle 3 cylinder with a 60 mile EV range, returning 50+mpg in range-extending mode, possibly with e-AWD as an option. And bring back the 2+2 seating.
 

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GM has a bit of self-destructive/self-limiting gene somewhere. Kill something that's the cat's meow.
Definitely! Or in some cases, kill the cat before it even has a chance to meow. ;)

As an example, GM developed a lineup of city cars that had gasoline powered, gasoline-electric hybrid, and battery electric versions as part of the XP512 project, which to no one's surprise was canned prematurely.

When this take place? Over 50 years ago! Long before Toyota conceived the Prius or Hyundai Motors the Ioniq.
Why does GM get nary a mention for its pioneering work involving hybrid powertrains? In part because of the company's self-destructive/self-limiting gene.

Volt's predecessor: GM's 512-series hybrid, electric and microcar
 

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Toyota debuts surprisingly stunning next-generation Prius in global reveal
It'll still clog up the left lane when you need it least, but at least it'll look great doing it
CHRIS TEAGUE
Nov 16th 2022
autoblog.com

The Toyota Prius may have kickstarted the hybrid vehicle revolution in this country, but it has never been an exciting or attractive car to look at. That’s changing with the upcoming next-generation Prius, and the new car sports a sleek look with stunning lines, as we can see from Toyota's global reveal ahead of its U.S. debut at the L.A. Auto Show.

Toyota is announcing the new car with the theme of “Hybrid Reborn” and says that the next Prius will deliver engaging driving performance. To do that, the automaker installed a new 2.0-liter plug-in hybrid powertrain that produces 220 horsepower. Stunningly, the plug-in Prius has a swift 0-60 mph time of 6.7 seconds. At the same time, the EV range is improved by around 50 percent, and Toyota placed the battery pack under the back seat instead of in the cargo area to enhance interior space.

The hybrid Prius gets an available 2.0-liter powertrain that makes 193 horsepower, which is 1.6 times better than the outgoing hybrid. The upgraded powertrain also receives a revised all-wheel drive system that uses an electric motor to drive the rear wheels. Toyota notes better low-traction performance in snow and ice and promises better performance in turns.

CONTINUE AT LINK ABOVE

I like that the front and rear wheel wells are the same height, I hate that droopy diaper look when the rear wheel well openings are lower that the front.
 
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