GM Inside News Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have been drawing the 2D sides of cars since i was 11, and only just the sides. Not the front, back, or 3D drawings, just 2D flat drawings of the profile of cars. I have kept my drawings from the age of 11 till now and i have improved drastically from then but still am just drawing the sides. Should I go about doing 3D practice drawings or consider something else? I will not be heart broken if anyone says I suck, I can easily go into architecture and/or development, so I am not banking on any one thing. Here is a recent drawing of four cars below:


Thanks for your answers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
352 Posts
practice makes perfect.

i would suggest tracing the profile of some cars that you like to get your proportions down even better. the rear of your car looks like its falling off the back of it. the downward slop on the rear of your car makes it look like the front is lifting off the ground. also keeping the bottom of the car flat from bumper to bumper will help it look less like the car is bending at the ends. most cars have a line going the opposite way, from high in the back to lower in the front, this gives the car a sence of movement even standing still. i've attached a car i drew a while back with some lines droped over it to illustrate what i'm talking about.

3/4 view opens up a whole new bucket of worms....
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,969 Posts
Keep doing it if you enjoy it. Nothing is better or more rewarding than to follow through with something you enjoy. If you continue to work hard and develop your skill some more, you may be able to get through school and maybe even a career for a manufacturer- perhaps BMW?? ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,152 Posts
MrJamesMc said:
I have been drawing the 2D sides of cars since i was 11, and only just the sides. Not the front, back, or 3D drawings, just 2D flat drawings of the profile of cars. I have kept my drawings from the age of 11 till now and i have improved drastically from then but still am just drawing the sides. Should I go about doing 3D practice drawings or consider something else? I will not be heart broken if anyone says I suck, I can easily go into architecture and/or development, so I am not banking on any one thing. Here is a recent drawing of four cars below:


Thanks for your answers!
If you enjoy drawing the vehicles but you want to move onto something a little more, I say go ahead and begin drawing the fronts and rears of the vehicles. It will probably wind up giving you a good perception of how lines travel around the vehicle, then, when you are ready to move on again, attempt 3/4 views.

Personally, I did the same thing as mentioned above, and it has been going pretty well IMO.

-Chase
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,736 Posts
MrJamesMc said:
I have been drawing the 2D sides of cars since i was 11, and only just the sides. Not the front, back, or 3D drawings, just 2D flat drawings of the profile of cars. I have kept my drawings from the age of 11 till now and i have improved drastically from then but still am just drawing the sides. Should I go about doing 3D practice drawings or consider something else? I will not be heart broken if anyone says I suck, I can easily go into architecture and/or development, so I am not banking on any one thing. Here is a recent drawing of four cars
Do what you think you are best at. I only drew 2D side profiles until just about a year ago, when I decided that I would try fronts/rears as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,887 Posts
.

Hi MrJamesMc

Everyone starts out just drawing side views, then front and back. It's always hard moving to the next level and doing 3D - for about a month. Then you get used to it and get better and better at it.

I've made a simple 3D car template below to help you practice. Just print it out on paper and use it as a guide. The lines print very faint and you don't have to use their shapes, they are only guides. You can move the parts and lines whereever you want using sweeping curves or sharp angles etc. Don't be limited by the template, let it free you to draw what you want, but let it guide your '3D perspective'.

You can make other templates from pictures you like by using tracing paper and just tracing the minimum outlines very lightly and edges and corners and wheels etc. Then scan it as a Jpeg and print it out on normal paper.



Here's a quick few minutes ballpoint pen sketch I did over the template as an example.



And if you can't see the template on the scan, here's a high contrast copy.




;)
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top