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So, so, so....soooooooo tired of the "Fiero Fire Trap Exaggeration". It was the '84 model that had the issue. Yes, shrinking the oil pan didn't help, but the main problem was the bad connecting rods fracturing. They recalled 125,000 cars, replaced the engines and that was that. The problem existed in 1 out of every 400 cars, no one was killed. The cars shown in this video appear to be modified, and we have no idea why they caught on fire. The Pinto had a much worse with 1.5 million recalled. Ugh. I loved my GT and my '88 4-cylinder. Great little cars with a LOT of potential. The next gen ALCOA designed aluminum space frame combined with the Quad 4 HO that could've been the 1989 model would have cleaned the Corvette's clock, which never would have been allowed.
 

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So, so, so....soooooooo tired of the "Fiero Fire Trap Exaggeration". It was the '84 model that had the issue. Yes, shrinking the oil pan didn't help, but the main problem was the bad connecting rods fracturing. They recalled 125,000 cars, replaced the engines and that was that. The problem existed in 1 out of every 400 cars, no one was killed. The cars shown in this video appear to be modified, and we have no idea why they caught on fire. The Pinto had a much worse with 1.5 million recalled. Ugh. I loved my GT and my '88 4-cylinder. Great little cars with a LOT of potential. The next gen ALCOA designed aluminum space frame combined with the Quad 4 HO that could've been the 1989 model would have cleaned the Corvette's clock, which never would have been allowed.
I agree. My parents bought an 84 Fiero and we owned it for 9 years. It was actually a fun little summer car, I have a lot of good memories of it.

The recall fixed the fire issue. Only other issue we had was a repair on the 4 speed manual.
 

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The Detroit accent is a nice touch.

I grew up with these cars all around Detroit, they were always quite striking. But I remember most people wondering why anybody would buy a two-seat car in the first place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So, so, so....soooooooo tired of the "Fiero Fire Trap Exaggeration". It was the '84 model that had the issue. Yes, shrinking the oil pan didn't help, but the main problem was the bad connecting rods fracturing. They recalled 125,000 cars, replaced the engines and that was that. The problem existed in 1 out of every 400 cars, no one was killed. The cars shown in this video appear to be modified, and we have no idea why they caught on fire. The Pinto had a much worse with 1.5 million recalled. Ugh. I loved my GT and my '88 4-cylinder. Great little cars with a LOT of potential. The next gen ALCOA designed aluminum space frame combined with the Quad 4 HO that could've been the 1989 model would have cleaned the Corvette's clock, which never would have been allowed.
Those 260 cars which burned made up just 0.7 percent of all Fieros sold. Also, unlike the case of the Ford Pinto, no deaths resulted from Fiero fires, and there were only ten cases of minor injury.
Carbuzz
 

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So, so, so....soooooooo tired of the "Fiero Fire Trap Exaggeration". It was the '84 model that had the issue. Yes, shrinking the oil pan didn't help, but the main problem was the bad connecting rods fracturing. They recalled 125,000 cars, replaced the engines and that was that. The problem existed in 1 out of every 400 cars, no one was killed. The cars shown in this video appear to be modified, and we have no idea why they caught on fire. The Pinto had a much worse with 1.5 million recalled. Ugh. I loved my GT and my '88 4-cylinder. Great little cars with a LOT of potential. The next gen ALCOA designed aluminum space frame combined with the Quad 4 HO that could've been the 1989 model would have cleaned the Corvette's clock, which never would have been allowed.
So true about the "fire trap." And what a shame GM gave up after getting the suspension upgraded to true performance-car levels with the '88. The future could have been very bright with potential new engines.

A lot of car problems of the past are greatly exaggerated, like with the legendary "Vegas ALL rusted on the showroom floor!" A small number of Vegas didn't go through the proper paint process and did rust. A fraction of the output. DeLorean addressed this in his book.

I often wonder how bad "bad" cars really were. Like in the case of the Vega for example. A lot of them had engine problems, having to do with a new aluminum block engine. But I wonder, what percentage? I knew three people who bought used Vegas back in the late '70s and early '80s, and they drove the heck out of them without major problems. Obviously if 20% of a model have major problems, really way less than 20%, that's a major failure. GM sold hundreds of thousands of Vegas. I wonder how may of the owners were really dissatisfied. Of course, if even 10%, probably 5% of owners have major issues with a car, that car's reputation will be greatly damaged.

When buying a car or talking to others about buying one, I've always pretty much dismissed quality concerns. It just seems to me that if you buy a "bad" car, the odds are still in your favor that you won't experience major problems. In mass manufacturing, even most models of a "bad" car are likely not to be bad. And I guess I'm more willing to take the chance that I'll get a bad one to buy a car that I really like. And I've taken that chance more than once and came out okay.
 

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So true about the "fire trap." And what a shame GM gave up after getting the suspension upgraded to true performance-car levels with the '88. The future could have been very bright with potential new engines.

A lot of car problems of the past are greatly exaggerated, like with the legendary "Vegas ALL rusted on the showroom floor!" A small number of Vegas didn't go through the proper paint process and did rust. A fraction of the output. DeLorean addressed this in his book.

I often wonder how bad "bad" cars really were. Like in the case of the Vega for example. A lot of them had engine problems, having to do with a new aluminum block engine. But I wonder, what percentage? I knew three people who bought used Vegas back in the late '70s and early '80s, and they drove the heck out of them without major problems. Obviously if 20% of a model have major problems, really way less than 20%, that's a major failure. GM sold hundreds of thousands of Vegas. I wonder how may of the owners were really dissatisfied. Of course, if even 10%, probably 5% of owners have major issues with a car, that car's reputation will be greatly damaged.

When buying a car or talking to others about buying one, I've always pretty much dismissed quality concerns. It just seems to me that if you buy a "bad" car, the odds are still in your favor that you won't experience major problems. In mass manufacturing, even most models of a "bad" car are likely not to be bad. And I guess I'm more willing to take the chance that I'll get a bad one to buy a car that I really like. And I've taken that chance more than once and came out okay.
My parents Vega is parked behind their house, hasn't rusted back into the earth and I think it might still run. It was a fun car.
 

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I drove one back when they were in production. It felt like sitting on the road, it was so low. And the foot pedals were skewed way inboard, which was awkward. With it's plastic body panels bolted to a steel space frame, it was supposed to be easy to update or even do custom body kits. I remember seeing one done up as a Ferrari 308 (Magnum, P.I. was quite popular then). From the outside it was a spot-on Ferrari, but it still had the cheap looking interior (good seats though) and it certainly had no Ferrari drivetrain.

GM was working on a new generation Fiero, but they badly botched the execution and cancelled the program. They weren't willing to front the money to try again.
 

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I drove one back when they were in production. It felt like sitting on the road, it was so low. And the foot pedals were skewed way inboard, which was awkward. With it's plastic body panels bolted to a steel space frame, it was supposed to be easy to update or even do custom body kits. I remember seeing one done up as a Ferrari 308 (Magnum, P.I. was quite popular then). From the outside it was a spot-on Ferrari, but it still had the cheap looking interior (good seats though) and it certainly had no Ferrari drivetrain.

GM was working on a new generation Fiero, but they badly botched the execution and cancelled the program. They weren't willing to front the money to try again.
Remember the Zimmer Quicksilver? Based on the Fiero!

Wheel Automotive parking light Car Tire Vehicle
 
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Just a quick point-out: When Mr. Camissa discusses the J-car future, they show an H-body Buick Skyhawk. Uh. Wrong platform, Hagerty.

Automotive parking light Wheel Tire Car Vehicle


Whoever did the research needs to try again. This is what they should have posted:
Automotive parking light Wheel Automotive side marker light Tire Sky

Or something similar. Way to go, people.
 

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Just a quick point-out: When Mr. Camissa discusses the J-car future, they show an H-body Buick Skyhawk. Uh. Wrong platform, Hagerty.

View attachment 68146

Whoever did the research needs to try again. This is what they should have posted:
View attachment 68147
Or something similar. Way to go, people.
Good catch. I had one of those, a 1980 with a manual. It was a fun little car . :) :D
Wheel Tire Car Vehicle Land vehicle
 

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Good catch. I had one of those, a 1980 with a manual. It was a fun little car . :) :D View attachment 68149
Wheel Tire Car Vehicle Hood


Mine looked like this, with white Vega GT wheels and black mirrors. I had the Vega GT steering box, steering wheel, a 4.3L V8 (not a typo) and the 5-speed manual from a '77 Buick Skyhawk. It originally had the Carmine red interior but I swapped in the black interior from the Skyhawk except for the red carpet and red seatbelts. I loved it. In hindsight, I know it was probably pretty slow and handled like a 3-legged pig in the corners but it was fun. I'd love to have another one, just to show my son that his first car wasn't quite as bad as he thought it was (a '96 Subaru Outback).
 
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