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The low profile tires don't look right to me, I like the look of the taller sidewalls. I think that is the first time I've ever said that :D
I agree, that is too far, at least for this vehicle. I saw it reported that the RST will be the first production vehicle to wear 24" wheels. Simcoe wasn't joking when he said 26" rims were on the horizon.
 

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The low profile tires don't look right to me, I like the look of the taller sidewalls. I think that is the first time I've ever said that :D
I agree.
Most of my life I liked the larger wheel option that came with most vehicles. About 5-6 years ago (probably when the ford Edge started having 21" or 22" wheels as an option), I started to think it was too much. Now I'm there for sure, those 24" wheels look bad because they are too big. Of course this is a large vehicle, but I think 20", MAYBE an option for 22 for some people would work, but the 24's just plain look bad.
 

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How did it fail? It was a bit pricey, so it's sales weren't great. But I hear people all the time saying they loved that truck, and when is GM going to bring it back? Tada! It's ba-ack.
If it was successful, they wouldn't have stopped making it to begin with.

People may have loved it, but some loved the Aztek too. Doesn't mean it was worth keeping around.
 

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There are plenty of Raptors and Kings Ranch luxury pickups with MSRPs over $100k that can't tow anywhere near 30k lbs.
Here is the most expensive SD I can find, it's a 450 and it's only....'only' $93,000

On a separate note

Ford slightly modified the ladder frame on a combustion F-150 to accommodate the battery pack.

And slightly modified the engine bay to accommodate a 14 cubic foot frunk. The upcoming Lightning is not a dedicated BEV.
I know that; do you think that is bad or good?

If it's just my perception, what's all the talk about the "wimpiness" of the Honda Ridgeline on here?
It's a minivan with a pick-up bed.

Gonna need more info to understand here. Is it a beach ball? A bowling ball? That might dent the cab back if I throw it in the front of the bed. Is this an aluminum bed vs carbon fiber bed comparison issue?
Lets start with a racquetball, we don't want to dent anyone's truck!
 

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What I'm interested in is the chassis cab trucks they build with no bed and sent to up-fitters to put on utility beds for construction trades and the like as well as the power and gas companies for their service vehicles. I'm not seeing this being possible so far with what we've been shown in the Ultium and skateboard platform and this reveal. Hmmmm...... :unsure: 🧐
 

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What I'm interested in is the chassis cab trucks they build with no bed and sent to up-fitters to put on utility beds for construction trades and the like as well as the power and gas companies for their service vehicles. I'm not seeing this being possible so far with what we've been shown in the Ultium and skateboard platform and this reveal. Hmmmm...... :unsure: 🧐
Don't be such a rabble-rouser; this is better...... "get in line and comply" 😁
 

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Don't be such a rabble-rouser; this is better...... "get in line and comply" 😁
It seems that way, but what will become of what I mentioned? Will other mfrs. have a different chassis electric type set up like Ford and the new Lightning, leaving lowercase gm to be scrambling for the next reconfiguration to address this "minor misjudgment"? :unsure: 😜
 

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I sucks that its only available in a crew cab and its one peice cab and bed.
 
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Here is the most expensive SD I can find, it's a 450 and it's only....'only' $93,000
2021 Ford F-150 Lariat SHELBY SUPER SNAKE $130k



A modified combustion truck is bad for efficiency/range. That is why Silverado will get upto 400 miles of range and Lightning up to 300 miles of range.

It is only good in the that you can find ready accessories from the large ICEv catalog.
 

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I'm faaaaaaaaaar from an expert in this area but I understand a large part of the reasoning behind the separation between cab and bed on trucks has to do with isolation of passenger comfort vs carrying capability.
That's not quite it.

Pickups have separate cabs & beds for 2 reasons. They're long vehicles, they are intended to be able to go off-road, and they have the capability to carry considerable weight in the beds. These factors can induce FLEX in the vehicle. In the distant past it was to the point of doors crimping shut- Ford tried a unibody pickup in '61-63-ish (alongside the conventional model), the complaints were numerous and it was dropped. Separate cab/beds allows chassis flex under extreme conditions.

The other aspect is the sheer number of variations in a full-size truck; there's nothing that comes close in the industry.
Like Ed mentioned: regular cab/ double cab/ crew cab & 5.5'/ 6.5'/ 8' beds (then throw 1/2-ton, 3/4-ton & 1-ton chassis' underneath). Can you imagine if that number of combinations were all unibodies? Well, you couldn't; because it would be mad cost-prohibitive to build that many, and OEMs wouldn't. But it's that level of choice in pickups (hand-in-hand with other, numerous factors) that have propelled the lowly farm truck into one of the leading vehicle classes in the U.S..

This is why I'm still waiting for clarification on whether this EV is a 'side model' like the original Avalanche, which I think it has to be; and not the actual mainline Silverado. Can't... can't have a single body configuration pickup, GM would shed sales like a waterfall.
 

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Ford tried a unibody pickup in '61-63-ish (alongside the conventional model), the complaints were numerous and it was dropped. Separate cab/beds allows chassis flex under extreme conditions.
It was BOF with a one-piece cab and bed. Either way manufacturers have made a number of torsional improvements over the last 60+ years so door-popping chassis flex isn't the unmitigated problem it once was for such vehicles... Avalanche, El Camino, vans, etc show that to be true. There was a question and my point was that there are in fact reasons truck cabs and beds have historically been separated, aside from factory readiness for conversions.
 

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That's not quite it.

Pickups have separate cabs & beds for 2 reasons. They're long vehicles, they are intended to be able to go off-road, and they have the capability to carry considerable weight in the beds. These factors can induce FLEX in the vehicle. In the distant past it was to the point of doors crimping shut- Ford tried a unibody pickup in '61-63-ish (alongside the conventional model), the complaints were numerous and it was dropped. Separate cab/beds allows chassis flex under extreme conditions.

The other aspect is the sheer number of variations in a full-size truck; there's nothing that comes close in the industry.
Like Ed mentioned: regular cab/ double cab/ crew cab & 5.5'/ 6.5'/ 8' beds (then throw 1/2-ton, 3/4-ton & 1-ton chassis' underneath). Can you imagine if that number of combinations were all unibodies? Well, you couldn't; because it would be mad cost-prohibitive to build that many, and OEMs wouldn't. But it's that level of choice in pickups (hand-in-hand with other, numerous factors) that have propelled the lowly farm truck into one of the leading vehicle classes in the U.S..

This is why I'm still waiting for clarification on whether this EV is a 'side model' like the original Avalanche, which I think it has to be; and not the actual mainline Silverado. Can't... can't have a single body configuration pickup, GM would shed sales like a waterfall.
I agree with you here.
 

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That's not quite it.

Pickups have separate cabs & beds for 2 reasons. They're long vehicles, they are intended to be able to go off-road, and they have the capability to carry considerable weight in the beds. These factors can induce FLEX in the vehicle. In the distant past it was to the point of doors crimping shut- Ford tried a unibody pickup in '61-63-ish (alongside the conventional model), the complaints were numerous and it was dropped. Separate cab/beds allows chassis flex under extreme conditions.

The other aspect is the sheer number of variations in a full-size truck; there's nothing that comes close in the industry.
Like Ed mentioned: regular cab/ double cab/ crew cab & 5.5'/ 6.5'/ 8' beds (then throw 1/2-ton, 3/4-ton & 1-ton chassis' underneath). Can you imagine if that number of combinations were all unibodies? Well, you couldn't; because it would be mad cost-prohibitive to build that many, and OEMs wouldn't. But it's that level of choice in pickups (hand-in-hand with other, numerous factors) that have propelled the lowly farm truck into one of the leading vehicle classes in the U.S..

This is why I'm still waiting for clarification on whether this EV is a 'side model' like the original Avalanche, which I think it has to be; and not the actual mainline Silverado. Can't... can't have a single body configuration pickup, GM would shed sales like a waterfall.
Largely, I agree with your assessment. However, there is one thing that it is important to understand lest your analysis descend into confusion. The original Honda Ridgeline is a unibody pickup truck. The Chevrolet Silverado EV is not. A unibody vehicle has a structural body with axles and motor attached to subframes. The Chevrolet Silverado EV, like most clean sheet designed EVs, is based on a skate body that includes the batteries, motors, axles, and the rest of the running gear. The skateboard is the result of decades of development. It fully functional without any body at all. It does not need an onboard driver. You see the Cadillac concept shuttle and the Cruise shuttle undergoing tests as autonomous vehicles. There drivers are computers.

Non-autonomous skateboard EVs are drive-by-wire. If you want a flatbed truck, then you can attach a bed to the skateboard and send it on its merry way. If you want the truck to have a human driver, then you attach a bed toward one end and a cabin toward the other. The rigidity is in the skateboard, not those two lengths of channel steel that run the length of the vehicle and are connected by smaller channel steel cross members. It must be understood that the skateboard design isolates most of the twisting torque from the skateboard. The design feature that does this is the independent suspension on each of the four corners.

We see that Ford has chosen four-wheel independent suspension for its modified BOF F150 Lightening EV pickup truck. The Ford Generation 2 BEV and the Volkswagen Group MEB platforms will be skateboards.
 

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That's not quite it.

Pickups have separate cabs & beds for 2 reasons. They're long vehicles, they are intended to be able to go off-road, and they have the capability to carry considerable weight in the beds. These factors can induce FLEX in the vehicle. In the distant past it was to the point of doors crimping shut- Ford tried a unibody pickup in '61-63-ish (alongside the conventional model), the complaints were numerous and it was dropped. Separate cab/beds allows chassis flex under extreme conditions.

The other aspect is the sheer number of variations in a full-size truck; there's nothing that comes close in the industry.
Like Ed mentioned: regular cab/ double cab/ crew cab & 5.5'/ 6.5'/ 8' beds (then throw 1/2-ton, 3/4-ton & 1-ton chassis' underneath). Can you imagine if that number of combinations were all unibodies? Well, you couldn't; because it would be mad cost-prohibitive to build that many, and OEMs wouldn't. But it's that level of choice in pickups (hand-in-hand with other, numerous factors) that have propelled the lowly farm truck into one of the leading vehicle classes in the U.S..

This is why I'm still waiting for clarification on whether this EV is a 'side model' like the original Avalanche, which I think it has to be; and not the actual mainline Silverado. Can't... can't have a single body configuration pickup, GM would shed sales like a waterfall.
It was BOF with a one-piece cab and bed. Either way manufacturers have made a number of torsional improvements over the last 60+ years so door-popping chassis flex isn't the unmitigated problem it once was for such vehicles... Avalanche, El Camino, vans, etc show that to be true. There was a question and my point was that there are in fact reasons truck cabs and beds have historically been separated, aside from factory readiness for conversions.
I should have exercised a little humility in my response, I apologize. There are videos on youtube of some trucks that apparently still struggled with the issue not that long ago, though it's hard to be sure they're not hyperbole or marketing stunts, and they are under extreme conditions as you stated. Search "chassis flex" or "frame twist".

Also, I'm not this guy's biggest fan but he did this short video on unibody vs BOF and does mention frame flexing on the latter.
 

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I mis-spoke when I said 'Unibody' ; I did mean a singular cab/bed body (yes; still BOF).

They were (and still are) commonly referred to an 'Unibodies', tho Ford called them 'Integrated Body' trucks. In an era (today) of primarily unibody construction, it can be confusing.

Ford tried them out because they were cheaper to build... but they just didn't meet regular use expectations. And they weren't available with 4WD...
 

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I mis-spoke when I said 'Unibody' ; I did mean a singular cab/bed body (yes; still BOF).

They were (and still are) commonly referred to as 'Unibodies', though Ford called them 'Integrated Body' trucks. In an era (today) of primarily unibody construction, it can be confusing.

Ford tried them out because they were cheaper to build... but they just didn't meet regular use expectations. And they weren't available with 4WD...
That was just because (60 years ago) Ford didn't really try to make them comparably stiff to a BOF design or AWD. It could've been done, but quite expensive. Back then unibodies were notoriously weak structures (compared to BOF) but inexpensive. In fact, the larger CARS were BOF. Today's unibodies are tremendously stronger structures than those old unibody vehicles. And that's also why they are now commonly referred to as "integral frame" vehicles - to try to distance them from those old designs. And 4WD, while pretty rare on unibody vehicles 60 years ago, is much more common now, and they stand up quite well.

In the old days, BOF was the cheapest way to get a high strength vehicle. In the last several decades, build processes, and grades of steel have been developed that have allowed frames to be made thinner without compromising strength, and unibody designs have been made stronger without compromising cost. The line between BOF and unibody has become quite blurred.
 

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2021 Ford F-150 Lariat SHELBY SUPER SNAKE $130k



A modified combustion truck is bad for efficiency/range. That is why Silverado will get up to 400 miles of range and Lightning up to 300 miles of range.

It is only good in the that you can find ready accessories from the large ICEv catalog.
Thanks for proving my point! 😁
 
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Non-autonomous skateboard EVs are drive-by-wire. If you want a flatbed truck, then you can attach a bed to the skateboard and send it on its merry way. If you want the truck to have a human driver, then you attach a bed toward one end and a cabin toward the other. The rigidity is in the skateboard, not those two lengths of channel steel that run the length of the vehicle and are connected by smaller channel steel cross members. It must be understood that the skateboard design isolates most of the twisting torque from the skateboard. The design feature that does this is the independent suspension on each of the four corners.
But each body needs to be unique; one of the primary benefits discussed, and what happens with the "one-piece" body with heavier weight/loads in the bed?

We see that Ford has chosen four-wheel independent suspension for its modified BOF F150 Lightening EV pickup truck. The Ford Generation 2 BEV and the Volkswagen Group MEB platforms will be skateboards.
With a separate/isolated box.........
 
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What I'm interested in is the chassis cab trucks they build with no bed and sent to up-fitters to put on utility beds for construction trades and the like as well as the power and gas companies for their service vehicles. I'm not seeing this being possible so far with what we've been shown in the Ultium and skateboard platform and this reveal. Hmmmm...... :unsure: 🧐
Most cab/chassis trucks are 2500HD / 3500 HD chassis'. Not saying they don't currently offer a cab/chassis 1500, just have never seen that.

There's really nothing to such a configuration- you just aren't paying for a bed. Or... buy one as is, undo 6 bolts and pull the bed yourself /wherever you're having said utility body installed.
 

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Looking a bit Korean, perhaps. And can someone please explain to me the benefit of an ultra expensive and complex bed door, which is there to allow you to extend long bed items into......instead of out the back of the bed. Really struggling with this one.
 
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