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The only thing everyone agrees on about Millennial driving habits is that they're on the decline. As you'll see in the chart below, every American age group drove less in 2009 than in 2001, but the gaps were strikingly high in the 20- to 40-year-old segments of the population. There's no arguing with these numbers:



Where things get polarized is why these shifts have occurred, because answering that question would help predict how these patterns will hold up in the future—and thus what policies we should adopt in the present. So we see cities claiming victory over Millennials. And we see suburbs making similarly compelling cases. We see claims that technology is changing Millennial behavior. And counter-claims that economics are at the root of this shift. It's a tug-of-war for America's young adults.

Here's the thing: it's very unlikely any single factor will emerge as the overriding reason why Millennials aren't driving as much as their parents did. Life just isn't that clean. To that end, Steven Polzin of the Center for Urban Transportation Research at the University of South Florida and colleagues do the debate a huge service with an objective data dive into the 10 biggest factors changing Millennial driving behavior, based on a 2009 national travel survey. Let's follow them inside the numbers:

1. Place of residence. Cities and suburbs each lay claim on Millennial living preferences, but as both places become more friendly to alternative travel modes, a more telling divide may come between metro and rural areas. The share of 18- to 30-year-olds in cities today is pretty close to what it was for Boomers: 32 to 28 percent, respectively, according to Polzin and company. But for towns and rural areas the share today is 14 percent, compared with 26 percent for Boomers. Given how much more driving occurs in non-metro areas, the shift into metros alone likely explains much of the overall decline.



2. Race/ethnicity. White Americans tend to drive more than other races and ethnicities do. But Millennials appear to be more diverse along these lines than young adults were in previous generations. There were 10 million fewer whites aged 20-to-39 in 2009 than in 1990, according to Polzin's team—a 16 percent change. If that diversity continues to grow, driving habits might continue to drop.



3. Education. Millennials are very well-educated, especially compared with Baby Boomers, and well-educated people tend to drive more than those who aren't. As 20- to 39-year-olds complete their education and enter the work force—assuming they can enter the work force—vehicle mileage among this group might increase. Of course, that also assumes they can pay down their enormous student loan debts and still have money left over for a home or a car.



4. Income. Money is certainly a huge factor in Millennial driving patterns. That's largely because people who make more tend to drive more, and right now Millennials just aren't making very much. What's very striking about the per-capita figures collected by Polzin et al, is that Millennials making a lot of money don't seem to be driving much more than those making very little. The over $100,000 category is the same as the $50-54,000 range, which isn't much higher than the $30-34,000 (i.e. intern) range. That said, the very low end of the scale shows a clear drop-off.



5. Living arrangements. Traditionally, personal driving patterns have been heavily influenced by living arrangements. People who own single-family homes unsurprisingly drive a lot more than people who rent apartments, Millennials included. With lots of Millennials beginning their adult life in their parents' homes—this described about 36 percent of 18- to 31-year-olds in 2012, compared with 32 percent in 1968—where they go next will have a lot to say about how much they drive.

http://cdn.theatlantic.com/assets/media/img/posts/2014/11/polzin_home/5be6ab77a.jpg

6. Lifecycle delay. People are marrying later in life: between 1970 and 2012, according to Polzin and company, age at marriage increased from about 23 to 29 for men and nearly 21 to 27 for women. Meanwhile, a woman's age at the time she had her first child increased from 21 to nearly 26 over the same period. Yet two-person households drive more than solos do across the board, especially when they have a young child, and these patterns are holding up for Millennials, as the figures below show. The big question is not so much whether the solos in these cohorts will drive more once they start families, but whether they'll start traditional families at all.



7. Licenses. Graduate license programs, paired with many of the economic factors mentioned above, have led to a decline in the share of licensed drivers under age 35—down from 46 percent in 1981 to 30 percent in 2012. Even if these Millennials get a license eventually, the question again becomes whether their non-driving habits will carry over into later years as a lifestyle preference.

8. Car-ownership. Whether or not you have a car has an enormous impact on how much you drive, even among Millennials, as the figures below show. At the same time, many of the economic and life-cycle factors mentioned above will make it either more difficult or less necessary for young people to make that purchase—something that has auto-makers scrambling to figure out a more attractive way to market to Millennials (i.e., the dashboard selfie). If nothing else, write Polzin et al, Millennials seem less infatuated with cars as status symbols than Boomers were.



Continued:
http://www.citylab.com/commute/2014...rs-changing-millennial-driving-habits/382763/
 

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"3. Education. Millennials are very well-educated, especially compared with Baby Boomers, and well-educated people tend to drive more than those who aren't."

I dispute this. Millennials may be well credentialed, but they are not well educated. In fact, I've never interacted with a more ignorant lot than millennials. I'd describe them as narcisstic fantasists who have spent a lot of money on getting credentials, rather than well educated.
 

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"3. Education. Millennials are very well-educated, especially compared with Baby Boomers, and well-educated people tend to drive more than those who aren't."

I dispute this. Millennials may be well credentialed, but they are not well educated. In fact, I've never interacted with a more ignorant lot than millennials. I'd describe them as narcisstic fantasists who have spent a lot of money on getting credentials, rather than well educated.
That's the same exact thing the older generations said about your generation when you were in your twenties. Every generation and middle aged and older people say the same thing about young people. They said it throughout history. We middle aged people are resentful for having lost our youth, so out of jealous rage we put down the younger generation.
 

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"3. Education. Millennials are very well-educated, especially compared with Baby Boomers, and well-educated people tend to drive more than those who aren't."

I dispute this. Millennials may be well credentialed, but they are not well educated. In fact, I've never interacted with a more ignorant lot than millennials. I'd describe them as narcisstic fantasists who have spent a lot of money on getting credentials, rather than well educated.
Heh. You're still thinking like a South African. You haven't been in this country long enough to grasp just how bad the schools here are; and you're in Texas, which has the worst schools in America. Most Americans couldn't handle an ordinary South African high school, much less something on the calibre of King David or Grey Boys'.
 

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Heh. You're still thinking like a South African. You haven't been in this country long enough to grasp just how bad the schools here are; and you're in Texas, which has the worst schools in America. Most Americans couldn't handle an ordinary South African high school, much less something on the calibre of King David or Grey Boys'.
Actually, Texas schools are pretty decent. I don't know what your bias is against Texas. They invest heavily in education.

http://www.nea.org/assets/docs/NEA-Rankings-and-Estimates-2013-2014.pdf
 

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Well they did just rewrite the curriculum so that any college professor that has looked at it has said that anyone graduating highschool under it doesn't stand a chance at getting through the first semester of college, so yeah, there's that..
 

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Well they did just rewrite the curriculum so that any college professor that has looked at it has said that anyone graduating highschool under it doesn't stand a chance at getting through the first semester of college, so yeah, there's that..
Depends on which metric you're using. People with agendas tend to cherry pick bits of information to suit their views.

The subjective opinions of a few professors do not outweigh the statistical analysis provided by the NEA.


I say this as someone who has no intention of moving to, working in, or living in Texas, nor any family there.
 

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Heh. You're still thinking like a South African. You haven't been in this country long enough to grasp just how bad the schools here are; and you're in Texas, which has the worst schools in America. Most Americans couldn't handle an ordinary South African high school, much less something on the calibre of King David or Grey Boys'.
Actually, we have a poverty problem more than an education problem. When adjusted for poverty US schools do better than any country.

http://dianeravitch.net/2013/12/05/daniel-wydo-disaggregates-pisa-scores-by-income/
 

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Welcome back steinravnik, where you on vacation? We hadn't many of these propaganda stories the last few weeks...............

I do find them interesting, but once again, an outdated out of context example...............

Plot an unemployment line over the same age ranges, additionally many, especially in 2009 that were working, had been forced into part time jobs, you don't commute 25 miles to work 25 hours a week at Burger King or Walmart.
 
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5. Living arrangements. Traditionally, personal driving patterns have been heavily influenced by living arrangements. People who own single-family homes unsurprisingly drive a lot more than people who rent apartments, Millennials included. With lots of Millennials beginning their adult life in their parents' homes—this described about 36 percent of 18- to 31-year-olds in 2012, compared with 32 percent in 1968—where they go next will have a lot to say about how much they drive.

http://cdn.theatlantic.com/assets/me.../5be6ab77a.jpg

6. Lifecycle delay. People are marrying later in life: between 1970 and 2012, according to Polzin and company, age at marriage increased from about 23 to 29 for men and nearly 21 to 27 for women. Meanwhile, a woman's age at the time she had her first child increased from 21 to nearly 26 over the same period. Yet two-person households drive more than solos do across the board, especially when they have a young child, and these patterns are holding up for Millennials, as the figures below show. The big question is not so much whether the solos in these cohorts will drive more once they start families, but whether they'll start traditional families at all.
I would "BET" over the same time detached suburb homes fell in comparison to urban multi-family housing as a percentage of homes occupied and along with that an increase in access to public/"active" transit options

I would also think an 04-14 window would be a LOT more telling as that would be between down turns
 

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"3. Education. Millennials are very well-educated, especially compared with Baby Boomers, and well-educated people tend to drive more than those who aren't."

I dispute this. Millennials may be well credentialed, but they are not well educated. In fact, I've never interacted with a more ignorant lot than millennials. I'd describe them as narcisstic fantasists who have spent a lot of money on getting credentials, rather than well educated.
This might be a little harsh. The millennials that I deal with at work are, like very other age group, a mixed lot. Some very well informed and motivated, others total slackers. Every age group has that feature.

"Well educated" probably refers to just number of years of school completed, degrees earned. There may not be a worse way of evaluating someone's knowledge than this. "Educated" and "well informed" are two very different things. Some of the most useless people that I've worked with over thirty years in the workforce are also the most educated. Some of the best people that I've worked with didn't go to college - and sadly wouldn't be hired for the jobs that they currently perform very well in because their companies now only hire college graduates.

The narcissistic comment I totally get. Again, I don't think millenials are more narcissistic than other generations. But they tend to make more use of tools that really broadcast their narcissism: social media. The crap that people tweet or put on Facebook, Instagram, etc. is very telling.
 

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6. Lifecycle delay. People are marrying later in life: between 1970 and 2012, according to Polzin and company, age at marriage increased from about 23 to 29 for men and nearly 21 to 27 for women. Meanwhile, a woman's age at the time she had her first child increased from 21 to nearly 26 over the same period. Yet two-person households drive more than solos do across the board, especially when they have a young child, and these patterns are holding up for Millennials, as the figures below show. The big question is not so much whether the solos in these cohorts will drive more once they start families, but whether they'll start traditional families at all.
that's curious... babies before marriage ends up more common than not?



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Interesting! I've seen a lot of bad driving habits out there and honestly, I find it more attractive and safer whenever I see a women who drives a car. Apparently, a recent study by the University of Michigan's Transportation Research Bureau asserts that there are more licensed girl drivers than men in the U.S. This reverses a gender gap that has existed when driving for a long time, notes the AP. Experts claim that the driver's license shift will have substantial influences on safety technology and economics. Are you trying to buy or sell a used or new 2007 Ford Focus Spokane? If this relates to you, visit the inventory at Spokane car.
 
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