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#1 VW Golf
The most popular engines
1.9 TDI / 105hp (30%)
1.4 / 90 hp (28%)
1.6 / 102 hp (13%)
The most popular trim level
Trendline
The most popular color
Black

#2 VW Passat
The most popular engines
2.0 TDI / 140hp (55%)
2.0 TDI / 170hp (20%)
1.9 TDI / 105hp (13%)
The most popular trim level
Comfortline
The most popular color
Black

#3 BMW 3er
The most popular engines
320d
318i
318d
The most popular color
Black

#4 Audi A4
The most popular engines
2.0 TDI / 140hp (41.3%)
2.0 TDI / 170hp (16.6%)
1.9 TDI / 115hp (10.6%)
2.7 TDI / 180hp (6.4%)
2.0i / 130hp (6%)
1.8 Turbo / 164hp (4.9%)
The most popular option
Front armrest (95.5%)
The most popular color
Black

#5 Opel Astra
The most popular body style
Wagon (55%)
Hatch (30%)
GTC (15%)
The most popular engines
1.7 CDTi / 110hp
1.6 Twinport / 115hp
The most popular trim level
Edition
The most popular color
Silver

#6 Opel Corsa
The most popular body style
3-door (58%)
The most popular engines
1.2i / 80hp (50%)
The most popular trim level
Edition

#7 Mercedes C-Klasse
The most popular engines
C220 CDI (40%)
C200 Kompressor (25%)
C180 Kompressor (15%)
C200 CDI (10%)
C320 CDI (5%)
The most popular trim level
Avantgarde
The most popular colors
Black and Silver

#8 VW Polo
The most popular engines
1.4i / 80hp (27%)
55 hp (24%)
65 hp (18%)
The most popular trim level
Trendline

#9 VW Touran
The most popular engines
1.9 TDI / 105hp (37%)
2.0 TDI / 140hp (29%)
2.0 TSI / 140hp (11%)
The most popular trim level
Trendline
The most popular color
Black

#10 Audi A3
The most popular engines
TDI (66%)
1.6i / 102hp (17%) or 115hp (5.9%)
The most popular colors
Black, Grey and Silver


Source and many, many more (German text only): http://www.autobild.de/artikel/die-elf-besten-der-nation-folge-1-_-vw-golf_525124.html
 

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Good for Germany....every one of the top 10 cars are German cars.

That means that the German carmakers are more in touch with the needs of the German buyers than American carmakers are with Americans.

The Golf and Passat are good cars, and I am sure their diesel engines are helping their sales a lot. If I am reading that correctly, it notes that over 80% of Passats have diesels in Germany.

I know they would sell pretty well here. I hope they can get those engines to meet our regulations sooner than 2010.
 

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Good for Germany....every one of the top 10 cars are German cars.

That means that the German carmakers are more in touch with the needs of the German buyers than American carmakers are with Americans.

The Golf and Passat are good cars, and I am sure their diesel engines are helping their sales a lot. If I am reading that correctly, it notes that over 80% of Passats have diesels in Germany.

I know they would sell pretty well here. I hope they can get those engines to meet our regulations sooner than 2010.
Germans have not fallen for the "everything Japanese is gold" mentality. Too bad we here don't believe in ourselves and our own cars the same way.
 

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The Germans like their non-flashy colors, don't they? Every single one was black, silver, or grey. Not that there's anything wrong with those colors - I happen to like them - but it's funny to see that.
 

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Hooray for the Saturn...I mean Opel Astra at #5! :hooray:
 

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Germans actually have pride in German cars. Not like here.
I can be proud of cars like a Corvette or a CTS.
I sure as hell will not be proud of a Lucerne, Monte Carlo, Lacrosse, Relay, Montana, Aztek, etc.

American automakers screwed themselves and they are paying for it.
In a country that allows the consumer to decide what is the best car for them, with freedom from blind nationalism, the consumer has chosen.
 

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In a country that allows the consumer to decide what is the best car for them, with freedom from blind nationalism, the consumer has chosen.
I think the above posters have a point. The Germans and Japanese are very nationalistic and this is a significant reason why their domestic automakers dominate their home markets.

General Motors’ and Ford’s recent products have competitive design integrity, quality, and reliability to Toyota’s and Honda’s products. It’s in Americans’ self interest to carefully consider these domestic cars and trucks because patronizing an American manufacturer benefits America’s economy to a much greater extent than patronizing a foreign manufacturer, even if a foreign manufacturer has manufacturing and design operations in America. It seems that many Americans are not nationalistic and not even neutral, but anti-Nationalistic (blame America first mentality) who look down on American institutions. In my opinion it's an odd way to look at the World that is destructive to themselves and America.
 

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I think the above posters have a point. The Germans and Japanese are very nationalistic and this is a significant reason why their domestic automakers dominate their home markets.

General Motors’ and Ford’s recent products have competitive design integrity, quality, and reliability to Toyota’s and Honda’s products. It’s in Americans’ self interest to carefully consider these domestic cars and trucks because patronizing an American manufacturer benefits America’s economy to a much greater extent than patronizing a foreign manufacturer, even if a foreign manufacturer has manufacturing and design operations in America. It seems that many Americans are not nationalistic and not even neutral, but anti-Nationalistic (blame America first mentality) who look down on American institutions. It is an odd way to look at the World and, in my opinion, this attitude is destructive to themselves and America.
I must disagree to some extent. I lived in Germany for two years (1987-1989) and was surprised then by the large market share German makers had of the market there (then 74%). But after speaking to many Germans about why they buy what they do, I realized Nationalism wasn't so much a mitigating factor.

Reading car magazines and talking to people in a country are a good way to find out why they buy the cars they do. And having lived in several countries around the world, I've noticed the main reason most buyers choose a car is uniform — it appeals to their wants and/or needs. There are Germans who buy cars for patriotic reasons, but not to the extent one would be led to believe.

The majority of Germans choosing home-grown cars do so for a myriad of other reasons. I found the main reason is the same reason customers all around the world like German cars — their unique characteristics. Germans are generally a very orderly people with sober tastes, an extremely high demand for quality and attention to meticulous detail. German cars deliver these traits better than anyone. In short, so many Germans buy German cars because Italian, Japanese, and French cars don't simply don't suit the tastes of many German customers.

But what else I found interesting was that some of the most popular imports in Germany at the time were bought because they didn't face competition from German makers. German makers tended to focus on C-class and larger cars, and often didn't have the best offering in the B-class segment. So many Germans flocked to cars like the Fiat Uno and Panda.

German cars were also expensive and very sparsely-equipped, with pricey optional features. Not all Germans are 'bahn-stormers; many simply want a well-equipped product at the price. I had one German friend bought a new Nissan Bluebird Diesel because he wanted tons of luxury goodies at a good price. A similarly-equipped Ascona or Passat were much more expensive. The Japanese also mopped up the 4WD market, which evolved into today's SUV's — a segment not represented by European marques.

And many Germans bought imports simply because they wanted something with more flair than Germany's very sterile and conservative products. Again, Fiat's huge popularity in Germany was due to its distinctly Italian characteristics. And by the 1980s, Germans were buying more Renault 4's and Citroen 2CV's than the French were! Many German customers were drawn to Japanese cars for their solid reliability.

But probably the largest single reason Germans buy such a high percentage of home-grown products is simple: German makers offer a staggering choice of engine, body style, trim, and color combinations, that can be often combined to where the customer is getting exactly what he or she wants. It's not uncommon for a German C-class car, such as the Opel Astra, to offer five different Diesel engines, five different petrol engines, five different body styles, upwards of seven or eight trim packages, and a myriad of color choices. Most imports offer far fewer combinations from which to choose.

It's much the same way Detroit markets their fullsize trucks. Look at the staggering combinations of engines, body styles, trim, and utility that GM offer just with the Silverado and Sierra. Apply that formula to cars, and you see part of why German cars do so well at home.

So yes, I'm certain there are a notable number of Germans who buy for patriotic reasons. But when it comes to brass tacks, the main reason local makers mop up the market there is simply because they offer precisely what the majority of German customers want — a well-designed, well-built car that suits the buyer's tastes and can be optioned to suit any need the customer wants.
 

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So yes, I'm certain there are a notable number of Germans who buy for patriotic reasons. But when it comes to brass tacks, the main reason local makers mop up the market there is simply because they offer precisely what the majority of German customers want — a well-designed, well-built car that suits the buyer's tastes and can be optioned to suit any need the customer wants.
But here's the question though, what if a Japanese, Korean, Italian, French, British automaker comes in and matches the germans for quality, build, perception, options, and price.

Would a German consumer be more apt to go import or domestic?

In the US, even if the US matched feature, styling, and perception, chances are the American will still go import.
 

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But here's the question though, what if a Japanese, Korean, Italian, French, British automaker comes in and matches the germans for quality, build, perception, options, and price.

Would a German consumer be more apt to go import or domestic?

In the US, even if the US matched feature, styling, and perception, chances are the American will still go import.
My guess would be that the average German buyer would surely go domestic...



I was just noticing there were no Fords in the German top ten. Back in the day, the Fiesta, Escort, and Sierra were all huge sellers. Has Ford hit the skids in Germany?

Upon closer examination, I see Fiat's the one that's hit the skids! Not a single model on the private buyers list!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
My guess would be that the average German buyer would surely go domestic...



I was just noticing there were no Fords in the German top ten. Back in the day, the Fiesta, Escort, and Sierra were all huge sellers. Has Ford hit the skids in Germany?

Upon closer examination, I see Fiat's the one that's hit the skids! Not a single model on the private buyers list!
The Fiesta is old and will replace soon. Focus has some build quality problems compared to Golf, A3, 1er and Astra. Ford worked hard to solve the problem on the MY2008 cars. Mondeo has a image of an old mans car like the Vectra. The new Mondeo should change this and that is also the reason why Opel change the name to Insignia.
 

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Reading car magazines and talking to people in a country are a good way to find out why they buy the cars they do. And having lived in several countries around the world, I've noticed the main reason most buyers choose a car is uniform — it appeals to their wants and/or needs. There are Germans who buy cars for patriotic reasons, but not to the extent one would be led to believe.

The majority of Germans choosing home-grown cars do so for a myriad of other reasons. I found the main reason is the same reason customers all around the world like German cars — their unique characteristics. Germans are generally a very orderly people with sober tastes, an extremely high demand for quality and attention to meticulous detail. German cars deliver these traits better than anyone. In short, so many Germans buy German cars because Italian, Japanese, and French cars don't simply don't suit the tastes of many German customers.

But what else I found interesting was that some of the most popular imports in Germany at the time were bought because they didn't face competition from German makers. German makers tended to focus on C-class and larger cars, and often didn't have the best offering in the B-class segment. So many Germans flocked to cars like the Fiat Uno and Panda.

German cars were also expensive and very sparsely-equipped, with pricey optional features. Not all Germans are 'bahn-stormers; many simply want a well-equipped product at the price. I had one German friend bought a new Nissan Bluebird Diesel because he wanted tons of luxury goodies at a good price. A similarly-equipped Ascona or Passat were much more expensive. The Japanese also mopped up the 4WD market, which evolved into today's SUV's — a segment not represented by European marques.

And many Germans bought imports simply because they wanted something with more flair than Germany's very sterile and conservative products. Again, Fiat's huge popularity in Germany was due to its distinctly Italian characteristics. And by the 1980s, Germans were buying more Renault 4's and Citroen 2CV's than the French were! Many German customers were drawn to Japanese cars for their solid reliability.

But probably the largest single reason Germans buy such a high percentage of home-grown products is simple: German makers offer a staggering choice of engine, body style, trim, and color combinations, that can be often combined to where the customer is getting exactly what he or she wants. It's not uncommon for a German C-class car, such as the Opel Astra, to offer five different Diesel engines, five different petrol engines, five different body styles, upwards of seven or eight trim packages, and a myriad of color choices. Most imports offer far fewer combinations from which to choose.

It's much the same way Detroit markets their fullsize trucks. Look at the staggering combinations of engines, body styles, trim, and utility that GM offer just with the Silverado and Sierra. Apply that formula to cars, and you see part of why German cars do so well at home.

and hey, you can get cloth througout the line-up of any BMW, MB or Audi in Germany! (same thing applys in Japan with toyota, honda and nissan)
 

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I wonder how well American cars sell in Germany. Most Germans think the Corvette is a piece of junk compared to a Porsche. They sure wouldn't knock the door down to buy a Buick. German cars have a certain feel to them that American and Japanese cars can't duplicate.
 

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I wonder how well American cars sell in Germany. Most Germans think the Corvette is a piece of junk compared to a Porsche. They sure wouldn't knock the door down to buy a Buick. German cars have a certain feel to them that American and Japanese cars can't duplicate.

Cadillac BLS 45
Cadillac CTS 57
Cadillac Escalade 181
Cadillac Seville 44
Cadillac SRX 45
Cadillac XLR 56
Chevrolet HHR 244
Chevrolet Tahoe 31
Corvette 469
Hummer H2 178
Hummer H3 322

Ford Mustang 332

Chrysler 300C 2998
Chrysler Crossfire 1053
Chrysler PT Cruiser 1055
Chrysler Sebring 426
Chrysler Voyager 2239
Dodge Avenger 57
Dodge Caliber 2237
Dodge Nitro 1341
Dodge Viper 21
Jeep Cherokee (Liberty) 528
Jeep Commander 1323
Jeep Compass 627
Jeep Grand Cherokee 2816
Jeep Patriot 98
Jeep Wrangler 1675

So that's 20,000ish units out of a total market of nearly 4 million.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
I wonder how well American cars sell in Germany. Most Germans think the Corvette is a piece of junk compared to a Porsche. They sure wouldn't knock the door down to buy a Buick. German cars have a certain feel to them that American and Japanese cars can't duplicate.
Buick ist not on sell in Germany and the Corvette is not in the same market as Porsche buyers look for (more luxury insteed of a sports car). Oh, and the price for a ZO6 is near at 120,000 US$. This and a nearly none existing dealer network and no advertising...yeah blame the german for this. :rolleyes:

Please read the list and tell me how many diesel cars sold GM in Germany (except the BLS a rebadged Saab/Opel)
 

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Germans have not fallen for the "everything Japanese is gold" mentality. Too bad we here don't believe in ourselves and our own cars the same way.
Here, Here! Its really said that they don't. Especially the veterans that drive around in their Toyotas. Anyone know where I can get a sticker to put on my Saturn that says "Drive American" ???
 
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