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Opel Media Online
2014-10-21


- Order books for new Corsa filling nicely even before the official market launch
- Delivery of the new generation Opel small car to start at end of year



Rüsselsheim. The Corsa has not yet officially hit the market but is already a success. Europe-wide, over 30,000 customers have already decided on the new Corsa, despite the Opel dealers only having opened their order books for the fifth generation of the small car in August and the official market launch still being a few weeks away.

“The new Corsa has had an excellent start. Even though the customers have not been able to see it at the dealers and test drive it yet we are already receiving numerous orders. That demonstrates that we have a convincing package of design, technology and price,” said Peter Christian Küspert, Vice President Sales & Aftersales Opel Group. “The fifth generation will continue the success story of the Corsa. The car is an important part of our model offensive that will increase our market share considerably during the course of the next few years,” added Küspert.

The new Corsa celebrated its world premiere at the Paris Motor Show at the beginning of October. The order books were opened in Germany first but now the Corsa can be ordered in almost all major markets.

“The Europe-wide availability of the Corsa should provide another boost. The car is not just popular in Germany but also in important markets such as Great Britain and France,” explained Küspert. The new Corsa will be at the dealerships in the first countries by the end of the year. The Europe-wide market launch will be completed by January 2015.

The Corsa is one of the most important vehicles in Opel’s portfolio providing around a quarter of the overall sales. Since the launch of the first generation Corsa 32 years ago, over 12.4 million units of the small car have been sold. The predecessor of the new Corsa was sold around 3 million times between 2006 and 2014.

Even it the end of its lifecycle the previous generation proved to be very popular. During the current year, no other Opel vehicle was sold more often in Europe than the Corsa D. In Germany, the small car topped its segment for new registrations in September.

The new Corsa stands for German engineering, emotional design and outstanding value for money. Safety and assistance systems along with new, ultra-modern engines and transmissions are the technological highlights.

The new Corsa is a major player in Opel’s model offensive that will see 27 new cars and 17 new engines brought to market by 2018. Next year, for example, the new KARL will be launched. With the new entry-level Opel, the Corsa E and the stylish ADAM, all introduced in the space of less than two-and-a-half years, Opel will have its strongest small car portfolio ever and one of the youngest on the entire automotive market.
 

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Well boy howdy how do you like that? GM gets smart, decides that Chevy indeed was souring the soup for Opel and makes a crazy (for GM) decision to take one huge step back and see what happens to Opel on its own. And look at that. Success. Mokka = monster hit. Adam = monster hit. Even the revised Insignia = hit. Oh, and let's throw in the Vauxhall van (name?!) that's also strong out of the gate. And now Corsa.

Fantastic news. Mary Barra/Mark Reuss could be the dream team for the next 15 years. Keep 'em coming!
 

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Well boy howdy how do you like that? GM gets smart, decides that Chevy indeed was souring the soup for Opel and makes a crazy (for GM) decision to take one huge step back and see what happens to Opel on its own. And look at that. Success. Mokka = monster hit. Adam = monster hit. Even the revised Insignia = hit. Oh, and let's throw in the Vauxhall van (name?!) that's also strong out of the gate. And now Corsa.

Fantastic news. Mary Barra/Mark Reuss could be the dream team for the next 15 years. Keep 'em coming!
Adam has not been a monster hit. It has simply done ok.

And the Corsa needed to be all new last year. Simply doing a refresh won't work for long.
 

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Well boy howdy how do you like that? GM gets smart, decides that Chevy indeed was souring the soup for Opel and makes a crazy (for GM) decision to take one huge step back and see what happens to Opel on its own. And look at that. Success. Mokka = monster hit. Adam = monster hit. Even the revised Insignia = hit. Oh, and let's throw in the Vauxhall van (name?!) that's also strong out of the gate. And now Corsa.

Fantastic news. Mary Barra/Mark Reuss could be the dream team for the next 15 years. Keep 'em coming!
Chevrolet captured such a small segment of the Euro market it almost made no difference. Even in England, where it's penetration is higher, it barely made 1%. The issue for Opel is continuing unprofitability means it's hard to justify expense on development hence the barely changed sheetmetal since introduction. So it isn't enough to sustain sales in the face of very good cheap Eastern-European cars like the Dacia, or perveived better German cars like the VW. Opel still has the stigma of 'not really being German' to contend with, hence Vauxhall sells better in England than Opel does at home. Plus the Eurozone will have financial issues for decades to come. Warmed over grey porridge is not that appealing.
 

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Chevrolet captured such a small segment of the Euro market it almost made no difference. Even in England, where it's penetration is higher, it barely made 1%. The issue for Opel is continuing unprofitability means it's hard to justify expense on development hence the barely changed sheetmetal since introduction. So it isn't enough to sustain sales in the face of very good cheap Eastern-European cars like the Dacia, or perveived better German cars like the VW. Opel still has the stigma of 'not really being German' to contend with, hence Vauxhall sells better in England than Opel does at home. Plus the Eurozone will have financial issues for decades to come. Warmed over grey porridge is not that appealing.
Are you saying opel is not going to see black ink?
 

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Adam has done pretty well for them though, considering how late to the party they were.
This man gets credit.


Dr. Karl-Thomas-Neumann

Define "pretty well"?

Europe Jan to June 2014:

Fiat 500 - 96,674
Fiat Panda - 81,796
VW up! - 69,651
Hyundai i10 - 42,129
Renault Twingo - 38,201
Toyota Aygo - 32,957
Smart Fortwo - 31,538
Ford Ka - 29,431
Adam - 27,931

You were saying....
 

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The Adam can't be considered anything but lukewarm. I really like it, but it certainly hasn't made much of a splash.

As for "30,000 orders!", I'm curious what is considered normal for a new model and 3 months of pre-orders. Is this a big deal? Do most cars have 10,000 orders? 50,000 orders? 100,000 orders? This number needs some context, otherwise we don't know if it's impressive or not.
 

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Are you saying opel is not going to see black ink?
GM made a turnaround of its European business a top priority after racking up around $18 billion in losses over the past 12 years, and is investing billions more despite calls from Morgan Stanley to sell Opel and its UK sister Vauxhall at virtually any cost
.

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/gm-aids-opel-booking-russian-profits-loss-making-130922334--finance.html


Do a Google Search for Opel financial results. but I don't think it's turned a dollar since 1993. Even the last set of GM spin just says 'reducing losses' to mere billions(!). Now - to be fair, GM makes Opel pay 'IP' payments per car for Epsilon and Delta which makes them to some degree paper losses. A bit rich when Opel also developed not only Epsilon/II but also Delta and GM feels free to use them elsewhere and charge IP payments to whichever subsidiary makes them. But GM also made Holden pay IP fees for Zeta and Delta - yet Holden still made money in it's annual earnings statements. Take away GM's dodgy accounting/writedowns for things like loss of plant value, which didn't represent actual money losses, Holden has made money for 20 years - 5% on reported, probably 10% actual ROI. Yet GM is closing the business as a sop to German unions and goverment.

Most German carmakers are still losing dollars in Europe, it's a bearpit. But unlike Opel the others are making money hand-over-fist outside Europe. Not Opel, because apart from England which even though the POMs like to pretend, England is still part of Europe. GM won't let Opel go to China (where it would muddy the waters with Buick and Chevrolet) or Middle-East (now GM US' baby) or Asia (Buick/Cadillac/Chevrolet). So as a sop, they have promised the German Gov/unions smallish volumes in Australasia. See Holden threads on Opel product for why this is not looking like a winning propostion.
 

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The Adam can't be considered anything but lukewarm. I really like it, but it certainly hasn't made much of a splash.

As for "30,000 orders!", I'm curious what is considered normal for a new model and 3 months of pre-orders. Is this a big deal? Do most cars have 10,000 orders? 50,000 orders? 100,000 orders? This number needs some context, otherwise we don't know if it's impressive or not.
I remember the Meriva had 100,000 preorders when it launched or something much higher than 30,000. So yes, this isn't all that great.
 

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Great News.

Thought the new Corsa might do well due to interior upgrades, chassis refinements and noticeably improved power-train options.

Good Work Opel.

Think the Vauxhall Corsa will deliver similar good news.
 

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as these are PRE orders for a unseen car I wonder what the "take rate" will turn out to be
I would see this as purely showing 30K people WANT a NG Corsa and HOPE it is good VERSUS the new car actually selling on its own points
 

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Chevrolet captured such a small segment of the Euro market it almost made no difference. Even in England, where it's penetration is higher, it barely made 1%. The issue for Opel is continuing unprofitability means it's hard to justify expense on development hence the barely changed sheetmetal since introduction. So it isn't enough to sustain sales in the face of very good cheap Eastern-European cars like the Dacia, or perveived better German cars like the VW. Opel still has the stigma of 'not really being German' to contend with, hence Vauxhall sells better in England than Opel does at home. Plus the Eurozone will have financial issues for decades to come. Warmed over grey porridge is not that appealing.
Opel is in the dumpster because of LACK OF INVESTMENT. It is not a bank where you make a deposit if the return is high. You have to invest first to get a high return. GM keeps penny-pinching on Opels, keeps extending lifecycles while competition shortens them, has not truly invested in their dealer network when they've fallen far behind VW or even Skoda (and they made them pay dearly for GM's mistakes and indecision - e.g. Chevrolet and Cadillac) and change their mind every 6 months on key points regarding Opel's strategy.

Meanwhile, e.g. PSA has been consistently investing in new Citroen products, keep the lineup reasonably fresh, have made their dealers closer to experience centres and keep putting cutting-edge technology into their cars. Citroen now charges more per car than peers according to PSA's data. And Citroen grows faster than the French market.

I don't think "not being enough German" is a problem. It is perceived as German. The problem is that it's like "it's German - so what?". There is no reason to buy Opel over VW. If you don't want a VAG, there are many other more exciting - and frankly simply better - choices.
 

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Most German carmakers are still losing dollars in Europe, it's a bearpit. But unlike Opel the others are making money hand-over-fist outside Europe. Not Opel, because apart from England which even though the POMs like to pretend, England is still part of Europe. GM won't let Opel go to China (where it would muddy the waters with Buick and Chevrolet) or Middle-East (now GM US' baby) or Asia (Buick/Cadillac/Chevrolet). So as a sop, they have promised the German Gov/unions smallish volumes in Australasia. See Holden threads on Opel product for why this is not looking like a winning propostion.
Because Opel is restricted to Europe by GM corporate policy - although Opel-originated models are sold around the world as other GM brands. All the other European brands can/do sell globally using the same brand, so the continued recession in the Eurozone shows less in their accounts.
 

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Simply doing a refresh won't work for long.
I don't think that is fair. The new Corsa is much more than a facelift, and a lot more than a 'refresh' - new suspension, new engines, new technology, new interior - I could go on.

To my eyes, they've done more than VW did turning the Golf Mark 5 into the Golf Mark 6. Nobody berated VW for that. Why berate GM?
 

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Because Opel is restricted to Europe by GM corporate policy - although Opel-originated models are sold around the world as other GM brands. All the other European brands can/do sell globally using the same brand, so the continued recession in the Eurozone shows less in their accounts.
Yes - but the experiment of letting Opel into Australia was a failure. Even though they had an enormous leg up with previous gen Astra sales - ten years back it was beating the Corolla. Commodore when Holden had complete control of product development and Astra when Holden dealt directly with Opel and specced the Family II 1800 and 2.0 litre motors, sports suspension package was an incredibly effective double-punch. The Commodore was the biggest selling car - virtually doubling Camry and creaming anything, and the Astra was the biggest selling small car - not because it was cheap, it was about the dearest short of Euro cars, but it was better equipped and more competent/fun to drive than virtually anything in the market.

Toyota actually stopped making Corollas here and started re-importing them because it couldn't compete on price or content.

So the problem for Opel is: as Holdens, they can't command proportionally higher prices in Australia because Holden is similarly positioned to Opel; but their import status makes them an expensive car. So it is hard to see, when the product doesn't justify it, and the price isn't low enough, how coming here to sell 5 or optimistically 10,000 cars a year at low margins is going to help GM or Opel? Australia is a bearpit, too. It's known Mazda takes a bath on base 3 sales, and dealers and Mazda make money back on more frequent and expensive servicing. Toyota - probably the same with Corolla.

And bear in mind: that 20-30,000 Astras a year was when Holden was No 1 in the market, and had over 300 dealers. Now Holden is No. 5, and falling, and many dealers have market share agreements: when Holden goes lower than a certain percent, there are less obligations on dealers for carrying stock and many have exit provisions. It's likely whatever big Opel comes here, it is going to sell a fraction - optimistically, a fourth or fifth of Commodore sales. And even though Cruze is way off the boil, it sold ten-twenty times as many as the Astra during the same year; a fresh new product when Cruze was old, selling for within $1000 in most cases. The dearest non-OPC Astra was the GTC which was $5K more than the top Cruze SRi-V with the same engine - but there is no Cruze coupe. Other than the tester I had, I have seen exactly one private example on the road.
 

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Great News.

Thought the new Corsa might do well due to interior upgrades, chassis refinements and noticeably improved power-train options.

Good Work Opel.

Think the Vauxhall Corsa will deliver similar good news.
Anything to keep your GM/GMC-Buick fantasyland afloat is good. You posted a long list of GMC's to come in your mind. I haven't yet seen your Opel/Buick list though. It should be just as entertaining...

Your two teams are getting close to killing off Chevrolet (& possibly Cadillac) but you're not quite there yet little guy. :(
 

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Yes - but the experiment of letting Opel into Australia was a failure. Even though they had an enormous leg up with previous gen Astra sales - ten years back it was beating the Corolla. Commodore when Holden had complete control of product development and Astra when Holden dealt directly with Opel and specced the Family II 1800 and 2.0 litre motors, sports suspension package was an incredibly effective double-punch. The Commodore was the biggest selling car - virtually doubling Camry and creaming anything, and the Astra was the biggest selling small car - not because it was cheap, it was about the dearest short of Euro cars, but it was better equipped and more competent/fun to drive than virtually anything in the market.

Toyota actually stopped making Corollas here and started re-importing them because it couldn't compete on price or content.

So the problem for Opel is: as Holdens, they can't command proportionally higher prices in Australia because Holden is similarly positioned to Opel; but their import status makes them an expensive car. So it is hard to see, when the product doesn't justify it, and the price isn't low enough, how coming here to sell 5 or optimistically 10,000 cars a year at low margins is going to help GM or Opel? Australia is a bearpit, too. It's known Mazda takes a bath on base 3 sales, and dealers and Mazda make money back on more frequent and expensive servicing. Toyota - probably the same with Corolla.

And bear in mind: that 20-30,000 Astras a year was when Holden was No 1 in the market, and had over 300 dealers. Now Holden is No. 5, and falling, and many dealers have market share agreements: when Holden goes lower than a certain percent, there are less obligations on dealers for carrying stock and many have exit provisions. It's likely whatever big Opel comes here, it is going to sell a fraction - optimistically, a fourth or fifth of Commodore sales. And even though Cruze is way off the boil, it sold ten-twenty times as many as the Astra during the same year; a fresh new product when Cruze was old, selling for within $1000 in most cases. The dearest non-OPC Astra was the GTC which was $5K more than the top Cruze SRi-V with the same engine - but there is no Cruze coupe. Other than the tester I had, I have seen exactly one private example on the road.
The high price of Opels as imports was due to the "cut" taken by GM Europe acting as middleman between Opel and Holden - superficially GM Europe has now been abolished with Opel given responsibility for all GM sales in Europe - but I've a sneaky suspicion that the old GM Europe has been renamed Opel Europe and that the Opel/Vauxhall operations may have even less corporate power than they did before.
 
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