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What Should Happen to Suburban?

  • Continue it on the C3XX Platfrom (successor to GMT-900)

    Votes: 295 76.4%
  • Move it to an Extended Lambda

    Votes: 41 10.6%
  • Kill it. It should die a BOF SUV.

    Votes: 46 11.9%
  • Slap the Suburban name on something else.

    Votes: 4 1.0%
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GM needs a real BOF SUV. If they want to modify the Tahoe into a Lambda-like vehicle, go ahead. But keep the Suburban real. The Suburban (particularly in 2500 form) has enough cargo carrying capability for a family to safely tow a large boat of fairly large travel trailer. People are buying up used Excursions for this very purpose. At some point those used vehicles are going to get run into the ground.......plus some people want a new truck dammit! ;)
 

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Affordable efficient diesel engines in all Suburbans and Tahoes immediately! The Suburban is by far the best vehicle in its class, continue refining and improving.
you said it my mom has a 02 LS with 4WD and towing package. It's a pig on gas but nothing beats it in winter driving and in towing situations. same story with it's ability to swallow huge volumes of cargo
 

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Affordable efficient diesel engines in all Suburbans and Tahoes immediately! The Suburban is by far the best vehicle in its class, continue refining and improving.
exactly! same with hummer, get them as efficient as possible asap,
so much so that they hit the news
 

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The Suburban's been around over 70 years, through thick and thin. Born while the country was climbing out of the depths of the Depression, it survived a World War, the "muscle" era, two oil crises, implementation of CAFE and the onslaught of imports... and survived unscathed.

While the "trendy SUV" customer has inflated Suburban sales figures far above its traditional 30k or so sales per annum, the hardcore buyers will always be there. The Alaskan family of twelve who live at the end of a three-mile-long gravel road. The work crew in the stripped-out, rubber-floored model. The Airstream RV owner. The Wildlife & Fisheries officer.

The Tahoe will come and go, and is likely to go sooner than later. Yukon sales will evaporate. Escalade will move to Lambda. It's unlikely Nissan and Toyota will replace the Armada and Sequoia, respectively, and the Expedition probably won't live to see the end of the decade. But amidst all this, the Suburban will remain, albeit in lower numbers, faithfully there performing the same perfunctory role it has for years.

Its days as a popular family car may be over, but the Suburban needs to live in the same successful formula it's lived for over half a century.
 

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The Suburban's been around over 70 years, through thick and thin. Born while the country was climbing out of the depths of the Depression, it survived a World War, the "muscle" era, two oil crises, implementation of CAFE and the onslaught of imports... and survived unscathed.

While the "trendy SUV" customer has inflated Suburban sales figures far above its traditional 30k or so sales per annum, the hardcore buyers will always be there. The Alaskan family of twelve who live at the end of a three-mile-long gravel road. The work crew in the stripped-out, rubber-floored model. The Airstream RV owner. The Wildlife & Fisheries officer.

The Tahoe will come and go, and is likely to go sooner than later. Yukon sales will evaporate. Escalade will move to Lambda. It's unlikely Nissan and Toyota will replace the Armada and Sequoia, respectively, and the Expedition probably won't live to see the end of the decade. But amidst all this, the Suburban will remain, albeit in lower numbers, faithfully there performing the same perfunctory role it has for years.

Its days as a popular family car may be over, but the Suburban needs to live in the same successful formula it's lived for over half a century.
Unfortunately, nowadays, nothing is sacred at GM (although the Camaro did make it back on a RWD chassis). There has to be guaranteed sales for them to continue with another generation. Fortunately, with the Suburban there are those sales there with those who live and work in the wide, open spaces of this country. I see it every time I drive to and from Texas Tech and the Metroplex. If you are making a living somewhere on HW114 you have to have a Suburban or its pickup equivalent to survive. Remember there was no such thing as a Tahoe 20 years ago, but there was a Suburban and it can be that way once again.
 

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Who would have thought of building less of them? :rolleyes:
 

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Killing the Suburban would be very dumb, there is so many people that love it and use it's capabilities to the fullest. The best thing to do would be keeping it on the BOF CX33 platform, or at the worst, keeping it's size intact on a (very) extended Lambda platform. Many people own them for the space it offers with a large family as well. The Suburban has lasted through worse like others have said, and it's still can be a moneymaker if done right.
 

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As I stated in the aforementioned article, the Pickups and long SUV's need to remain BOF on the C3XX platform.

Even though the general public may not be buying them in droves ever again, we all know someone with 6 kids, or someone who owns a larger boat/ship, or who owns a large trailer., etc. You cannot expect someone who has lots of toys to change their lifestyle because the company they have purchased products from before "changes their portfolio." If GM were to stop building the Suburban, I know at least a few folks who would go to Ford or Dodge the next time. A Traverse, let alone something like the G8 ST, simply cannot handle a family of 6 with a large trailer.
 

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I think the Suburban should move to a monocoque design. People wrongly think that a BOF is somehow stronger or more durable than a monocoque structure, which is simply not true. Pound for pound a monocoque will always be stronger when using a passenger vehicle format. Only with a non crew cab pickup bed is a monocoque not stronger, and that is because of the poor structural rigidity of an open bed tub.




;)
 

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I think the Suburban should move to a monocoque design. People wrongly think that a BOF is somehow stronger or more durable than a monocoque structure, which is simply not true. Pound for pound a monocoque will always be stronger when using a passenger vehicle format. Only with a non crew cab pickup bed is a monocoque not stronger, and that is because of the poor structural rigidity of an open bed tub.




;)
Whilst that is true, I believe the unique benefits of BOF fit this scenario quite well. That is, the body can be replaced through lower cost and therefore extend the life of the chassis.

As many others have said, it is unlikely to continue as a family transport and will most likely be used that wich was originally intended.

So reduced numbers = less cash to attribute to future development.

Slapping a new top on every 3 years for the next 6-8, with updated engines and occasional extra bells or whistles, should become the Suburbans fate. If not for the singular benefit of cost savings, then for maintaining the perception of BOF superiority. Whilst monocoque may well be as good, try convincing those that have been driving Suburbans for the last 25 years and have defended their BOF over more modern equivalents. ;)

Keep the locals happy and this line can continue with minimal investment (obviously = better return).
 

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The Suburban should and will go back to what it was before the SUV craze.

Nuff said.
a large, BOF, V8 powered, primarily RWD SUV?
 

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Whilst that is true, I believe the unique benefits of BOF fit this scenario quite well. That is, the body can be replaced through lower cost and therefore extend the life of the chassis.

As many others have said, it is unlikely to continue as a family transport and will most likely be used that which was originally intended.

So reduced numbers = less cash to attribute to future development.

Slapping a new top on every 3 years for the next 6-8, with updated engines and occasional extra bells or whistles, should become the Suburbans fate. If not for the singular benefit of cost savings, then for maintaining the perception of BOF superiority. Whilst monocoque may well be as good, try convincing those that have been driving Suburbans for the last 25 years and have defended their BOF over more modern equivalents. ;)

Keep the locals happy and this line can continue with minimal investment (obviously = better return).
If Suburban is to go back to it's utilitarian duties then it need not change it's body every few years to stay fashionable. It just needs a great, efficient, strong and durable structure to start with and let it stay unchanged but for front and rear clip restyles every 4 years. I think the Suburban went unchanged structurally from about 1973 – 1991.

By using high strength galvanised steel sheet stampings it will last longer than a BOF, tow more and be more fuel-efficient. Instead of being lighter, which lowers it's towing capacity, it can use the weight efficiency of the monocoque structure to better place weight from such things as battery packs for BASS or Two-Mode.

And why attempt to maintain a false premise that BOF is superior when it is simply not?

:eek:

Selling the idea of a monocoque Suburban to Americans is like selling the idea of a large FWD Falcon or Commodore to Ozzies!
Not analogous at all. Monocoque is superior and offers better strength to weight, less chassis flex which means you can have greater flex in the suspension for better off-road capability AND better on-road handling. In a warm country like OZ, where snow and ice are not an issue, RWD is dynamically superior to FWD. So what you are saying is that sticking with something inferior is to Americans what sticking to something superior is to Australians......:D

Of course given American predilections for putting up with bad stuff just because foreigners invented the better stuff, you may have a point; but not about the comparison to FWD Falcon.




;)
 
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