GM Inside News Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
37,222 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
By Katie Spence

September 12, 2022 Updated: September 14,


In Chile’s Salar de Atacama, locals watch helplessly as their ancestral lands wither and die, their precious water resources evaporating in briny salars.
In the Democratic Republic of Congo, hope for a better life dissolves as well-funded Ugandan-led extremist groups force children as young as 6 to work in cobalt mines.
Closer to home, Nevada’s Fort McDermitt Tribe and local ranchers fight to protect a sacred burial site and agricultural lands set to be sacrificed by Lithium Nevada, a mining company, in the coming days.
Meanwhile, in California and other states, politicians such as Gov. Gavin Newsom (D-Calif.) pat themselves on the back for their “aggressive” environmental stance and boast that their gas-powered vehicle bans are leading “the revolution towards our zero-emission transportation future.”
The Hidden Costs
According to politicians like Newsom and President Joe Biden, electric vehicles (EV) are “zero-emission” because they use lithium-ion batteries—consisting of lithium, cobalt, graphite, and other materials—instead of gas.
Thus, starting in 2035, California will ban gas-powered vehicle sales, while several other states plan to follow suit, citing that as a goal and “critical milestone in our climate fight,” on Twitter.
Additionally, according to a statement from Biden, banning gas-powered vehicles will “save consumers money, cut pollution, boost public health, advance environmental justice, and tackle the climate crisis.”
John Hadder, director of the Great Basin Resource Watch, disagrees, pointing out to The Epoch Times that “industrial” nations might benefit from the transition to EVs, but it’s at the expense of others.
Kamala Harris charges an electric vehicleVice President Kamala Harris charges an electric vehicle in Prince George’s County, Md., on Dec. 13, 2021. (Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP Photo)
“This expansion of [lithium] mining will have immediate consequences for front-line communities that are taking the ‘hit.’”
For example, Copiapó, the capital of Chile’s Atacama region, is the location of one of the world’s largest known lithium reserves.
“We used to have a river before, that now doesn’t exist. There isn’t a drop of water,” Elena Rivera Cardoso, president of the Indigenous Colla community of the Copiapó commune, told the National Resources Defense Council (NRDC).
She added that all of Chile’s water is disappearing because of the local lithium mine.
“In all of Chile, there are rivers and lakes that have disappeared—all because a company has a lot more right to water than we do as human beings or citizens of Chile.”
unique lithium technologyBrine pools from a lithium mine that belongs to U.S.-based Albemarle Corp., are seen on the Atacama salt flat in the Atacama desert, Chile, on Aug. 16, 2018. (Ivan Alvarado/Reuters)
In collaboration with Cardosa’s statement, the Institute for Energy Research reports that 65 percent of the area’s limited water resources are consumed by mining activities.
That’s displacing indigenous communities who have called Atacama home for more than 6,000 years, because farmers and ranchers have cracked, dry soil, and no choice but to abandon their ancestral settlements, according to the U.N. Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD).
Mine Proposed in Northern Nevada
Saying goodbye to an ancestral homeland as a local lithium mine destroys it is something the communities in northern Nevada are fighting to avoid.
“The agricultural communities on either side of the pass are likely to be changed forever,” Hadder told The Epoch Times. “The [Thacker Pass mine] could affect their ability to farm and ranch in the area. The air quality will decrease … and increased water scarcity is likely.”
Epoch Times PhotoThacker Pass. (Lithium Americas)
Hadder pointed out that the Quinn-Production well in Orovada Subarea Hydrographic Basin, which supplies water to Thacker Pass, is already heavily overallocated.
But, lacking water isn’t the only concern locals have with Thacker Pass, he says.
“[The National Congress of American Indians] are deeply concerned that the mine will threaten the community with man-camps and large labor forces,” Hadder said. “The introduction of man-camps near reservations has been shown to correlate strongly with an increase in sexual assaults, domestic violence, and sex trafficking.”
That concern has merit. In 2014, the United Nations found that “extractive industries,” aka mines, led to increased instances of sexual harassment, violence, rape, and assault, due to “man-camps” or workers at the mine.
Epoch Times PhotoTesla Motors Inc. plans to build a 6,500-worker “gigafactory” to mass produce cheaper lithium batteries for its next line of more-affordable electric cars near the center. (AP Photo/Scott Sonner)
In 2019, the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics published a study validating the above information. It found a 70 percent increase in violent crime “corresponding to the growth of extractive industry in the areas, with no such increase observed in adjacent counties without extractive industries.”
Experience of Congolese Miners
That’s something the people of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) know from first-hand experience.
In its 2022 report, the U.S. Geological Survey reported that in 2021, more than 70 percent of the global cobalt production came from the DRC and that southern Congo sits atop an estimated 3.5 million metric tons—almost half—of the world’s known supply.
It’s also one of the world’s poorest countries, according to the nonpartisan Wilson Center, and plagued by humanitarian crises, some of which are directly caused by mining.
Epoch Times PhotoA child walks past a truck carrying rocks extracted from a cobalt mine at a copper quarry and cobalt pit in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, on May 23, 2016. (Junior Kannah/AFP via Getty Images)
In December 2021, researchers at Northwestern University conducted an environmental life cycle assessment on extracting raw materials needed for EVs and published their paper in One Earth’s Journal.
They found cobalt mining was associated with increased violence, physical and mental health challenges, substance abuse, and food and water insecurity, among other issues. They further noted that community members lost communal land, farmland, and homes, which miners dug up to extract cobalt.
“You might think of mining as just digging something up,” said Sera L. Young, an associate professor of anthropology at Northwestern University. “But they are not digging on vacant land. Homelands are dug up. People are literally digging holes in their living room floors. The repercussions of mining can touch almost every aspect of life.”
That “every aspect of life” includes children. In the DRC, an estimated 40,000 children are working in the mines under slave labor conditions—some as young as 6. Initially, there was hope that DRC President Felix Tschisekedi would curb the abuses, but now those hopes are dwindling.
Epoch Times PhotoPeople work at the Kalimbi cassiterite artisanal mining site north of Bukavu, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, on March 30, 2017. (Griff Tapper/AFP via Getty Images)
In her address before the U.S. Congress on July 14, Crisis and Conflict Director for Human Rights Watch Ida Sawyer stated that “child labor and other serious human rights abuses in the mining sector remain widespread, and these challenges only become harder to address amidst rampant corruption.”
“The Allied Democratic Forces (ADF), a Ugandan-led armed Islamist group with ties to the Islamic State (ISIS) … as well as their backers among the Congolese political and military elite, control lucrative mineral resources, land, and taxation rackets.”

The Wilson Center reports that there are an estimated 255,000 Congolese miners laboring for cobalt, primarily using their hands.
“As global demand for Congolese mineral resources increases, so do the associated dangers that raise red flags for Congolese miners’ human rights,” it said.
And human rights violations aren’t the only concern with cobalt mining. Wilson Center states: “The extraction of DRC mineral resources includes cutting down trees and building roads, negatively impacting the environment and biodiversity … Cobalt mining operations generate incredibly high carbon dioxide and nitrogen dioxide emissions and substantial electricity consumption. These emissions contribute to the fact that Africa produces five percent of carbon dioxide emissions globally.”
Epoch Times PhotoCalifornia Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks in Los Angeles, on Sept. 29, 2021. (John Fredricks/The Epoch Times)
Meanwhile, in California, Newsom extolled his state’s move away from fossil fuels.
“This plan’s yearly targets—35 percent ZEV sales by 2026, 68 percent by 2030, and 100 percent by 2035—provide our roadmap to reducing dangerous carbon emissions and moving away from fossil fuels. That’s 915 million oil barrels’ worth of emissions that won’t pollute our communities.”
Katie Spence

Follow
Katie covers energy and politics for The Epoch Times. Before starting her career as a journalist, Katie proudly served in the Air Force as an Airborne Operations Technician on JSTARS. She obtained her degree in Analytic Philosophy and a minor in Cognitive Studies from the University of Colorado. Katie’s writing has appeared on CNSNews.com, The Maverick Observer, The Motley Fool, First Quarter Finance, The Cheat Sheet, and Investing.com. Email her at [email protected]
 
  • Sad
  • Angry
Reactions: Evo69 and RamJet502

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,844 Posts
From the movie Gladiator:

Quintus:
People should know when they are conquered.

Maximus:
Would you, Quintus? Would I?


I'm sorry my friend, this fight has been lost. The internal combustion engine was just checked into hospice, it's only a matter of time now. Those of us that love the sound of a mean V8, the chop of a lopey cam, or ripping thru gears will just have to tell each other stories in the nursing homes about the good old days.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
37,222 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It ain't over 'til it's over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,126 Posts
If it's not in their backyard, they don't care.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,943 Posts
^ 'Her car'? Isn't she banned from driving for life, like the President?
Those of us that love the sound of a mean V8, the chop of a lopey cam, or ripping thru gears will just have to tell each other stories in the nursing homes about the good old days.
Uhhh..... you can always buy used / vintage. I'm not selling my '64 or '59 come 2030 - 2035 - 2040.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
It ain't over 'til it's over.
Sure plenty here with a crystal ball. Same guys compare ICE to horse and buggy, stop and think about that for a minute. Hope they don’t like air travel in their “future”, that certainly would be a bit hypocritical.

Both work well for whomever decides to buy one or the other. EV most certainly will not work for everyone, just the same as a ICE is inferior to many who’s use suits owning a EV perfectly. This debate has become too politicized IMO.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
37,222 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I want to know if Vice President Kamala Harris stood like that for four hours while her car charged.
You mean without breaking out into a cackling fit?

But that's not HER car anyway. It's a county caah. And in my professional cynic's opinion, I'm guessing she hightailed it outta there el quicko once the photos were shot.

Sure plenty here with a crystal ball. Same guys compare ICE to horse and buggy, stop and think about that for a minute. Hope they don’t like air travel in their “future”, that certainly would be a bit hypocritical.

Both work well for whomever decides to buy one or the other. EV most certainly will not work for everyone, just the same as a ICE is inferior to many who’s use suits owning a EV perfectly. This debate has become too politicized IMO.
Indeed, too politicized. If this was free market talking, I daresay there would be a lot less hot debate.

BTW I see the federales are promising to build a bunch of gas sta...I mean lektrik charging stations. I wonder, when Henry Ford was hard at work building T's and then A's, did the feds finance a bunch of gas stations? I'll have to check with my financial advisor on that one, but right now I'm going to guess no.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
384 Posts
Thank blessed goodness for the crisp, clean, and wholesomely pure Oil Industry, founded from the dust of Angels.

Bless too its religious disciples, these agents of Big Oil, spreading forth their suddenly newfound concerns and love for our environment. For they have answered this calling from their chosen media.

May your sincerity be recognised for all it represents, amen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
824 Posts
Thank blessed goodness for the crisp, clean, and wholesomely pure Oil Industry, founded from the dust of Angels.

Bless too its religious disciples, these agents of Big Oil, spreading forth their suddenly newfound concerns and love for our environment. For they have answered this calling from their chosen media.

May your sincerity be recognised for all it represents, amen.
2 wrongs don't make a right. They can't claim that this transition is so great for the environment and then when called out on stuff like this say "but the oil industry is dirty too"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,073 Posts
By Katie Spence

September 12, 2022 Updated: September 14,


In Chile’s Salar de Atacama, locals watch helplessly as their ancestral lands wither and die, their precious water resources evaporating in briny salars.
In the Democratic Republic of Congo, hope for a better life dissolves as well-funded Ugandan-led extremist groups force children as young as 6 to work in cobalt mines.
Closer to home, Nevada’s Fort McDermitt Tribe and local ranchers fight to protect a sacred burial site and agricultural lands set to be sacrificed by Lithium Nevada, a mining company, in the coming days.
Meanwhile, in California and other states, politicians such as Gov. Gavin Newsom (D-Calif.) pat themselves on the back for their “aggressive” environmental stance and boast that their gas-powered vehicle bans are leading “the revolution towards our zero-emission transportation future.”
The Hidden Costs
According to politicians like Newsom and President Joe Biden, electric vehicles (EV) are “zero-emission” because they use lithium-ion batteries—consisting of lithium, cobalt, graphite, and other materials—instead of gas.
Thus, starting in 2035, California will ban gas-powered vehicle sales, while several other states plan to follow suit, citing that as a goal and “critical milestone in our climate fight,” on Twitter.
Additionally, according to a statement from Biden, banning gas-powered vehicles will “save consumers money, cut pollution, boost public health, advance environmental justice, and tackle the climate crisis.”
John Hadder, director of the Great Basin Resource Watch, disagrees, pointing out to The Epoch Times that “industrial” nations might benefit from the transition to EVs, but it’s at the expense of others.
Kamala Harris charges an electric vehicleVice President Kamala Harris charges an electric vehicle in Prince George’s County, Md., on Dec. 13, 2021. (Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP Photo)
“This expansion of [lithium] mining will have immediate consequences for front-line communities that are taking the ‘hit.’”
For example, Copiapó, the capital of Chile’s Atacama region, is the location of one of the world’s largest known lithium reserves.
“We used to have a river before, that now doesn’t exist. There isn’t a drop of water,” Elena Rivera Cardoso, president of the Indigenous Colla community of the Copiapó commune, told the National Resources Defense Council (NRDC).
She added that all of Chile’s water is disappearing because of the local lithium mine.
“In all of Chile, there are rivers and lakes that have disappeared—all because a company has a lot more right to water than we do as human beings or citizens of Chile.”
unique lithium technologyBrine pools from a lithium mine that belongs to U.S.-based Albemarle Corp., are seen on the Atacama salt flat in the Atacama desert, Chile, on Aug. 16, 2018. (Ivan Alvarado/Reuters)
In collaboration with Cardosa’s statement, the Institute for Energy Research reports that 65 percent of the area’s limited water resources are consumed by mining activities.
That’s displacing indigenous communities who have called Atacama home for more than 6,000 years, because farmers and ranchers have cracked, dry soil, and no choice but to abandon their ancestral settlements, according to the U.N. Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD).
Mine Proposed in Northern Nevada
Saying goodbye to an ancestral homeland as a local lithium mine destroys it is something the communities in northern Nevada are fighting to avoid.
“The agricultural communities on either side of the pass are likely to be changed forever,” Hadder told The Epoch Times. “The [Thacker Pass mine] could affect their ability to farm and ranch in the area. The air quality will decrease … and increased water scarcity is likely.”
Epoch Times PhotoThacker Pass. (Lithium Americas)
Hadder pointed out that the Quinn-Production well in Orovada Subarea Hydrographic Basin, which supplies water to Thacker Pass, is already heavily overallocated.
But, lacking water isn’t the only concern locals have with Thacker Pass, he says.
“[The National Congress of American Indians] are deeply concerned that the mine will threaten the community with man-camps and large labor forces,” Hadder said. “The introduction of man-camps near reservations has been shown to correlate strongly with an increase in sexual assaults, domestic violence, and sex trafficking.”
That concern has merit. In 2014, the United Nations found that “extractive industries,” aka mines, led to increased instances of sexual harassment, violence, rape, and assault, due to “man-camps” or workers at the mine.
Epoch Times PhotoTesla Motors Inc. plans to build a 6,500-worker “gigafactory” to mass produce cheaper lithium batteries for its next line of more-affordable electric cars near the center. (AP Photo/Scott Sonner)
In 2019, the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics published a study validating the above information. It found a 70 percent increase in violent crime “corresponding to the growth of extractive industry in the areas, with no such increase observed in adjacent counties without extractive industries.”
Experience of Congolese Miners
That’s something the people of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) know from first-hand experience.
In its 2022 report, the U.S. Geological Survey reported that in 2021, more than 70 percent of the global cobalt production came from the DRC and that southern Congo sits atop an estimated 3.5 million metric tons—almost half—of the world’s known supply.
It’s also one of the world’s poorest countries, according to the nonpartisan Wilson Center, and plagued by humanitarian crises, some of which are directly caused by mining.
Epoch Times PhotoA child walks past a truck carrying rocks extracted from a cobalt mine at a copper quarry and cobalt pit in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, on May 23, 2016. (Junior Kannah/AFP via Getty Images)
In December 2021, researchers at Northwestern University conducted an environmental life cycle assessment on extracting raw materials needed for EVs and published their paper in One Earth’s Journal.
They found cobalt mining was associated with increased violence, physical and mental health challenges, substance abuse, and food and water insecurity, among other issues. They further noted that community members lost communal land, farmland, and homes, which miners dug up to extract cobalt.
“You might think of mining as just digging something up,” said Sera L. Young, an associate professor of anthropology at Northwestern University. “But they are not digging on vacant land. Homelands are dug up. People are literally digging holes in their living room floors. The repercussions of mining can touch almost every aspect of life.”
That “every aspect of life” includes children. In the DRC, an estimated 40,000 children are working in the mines under slave labor conditions—some as young as 6. Initially, there was hope that DRC President Felix Tschisekedi would curb the abuses, but now those hopes are dwindling.
Epoch Times PhotoPeople work at the Kalimbi cassiterite artisanal mining site north of Bukavu, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, on March 30, 2017. (Griff Tapper/AFP via Getty Images)
In her address before the U.S. Congress on July 14, Crisis and Conflict Director for Human Rights Watch Ida Sawyer stated that “child labor and other serious human rights abuses in the mining sector remain widespread, and these challenges only become harder to address amidst rampant corruption.”
“The Allied Democratic Forces (ADF), a Ugandan-led armed Islamist group with ties to the Islamic State (ISIS) … as well as their backers among the Congolese political and military elite, control lucrative mineral resources, land, and taxation rackets.”

The Wilson Center reports that there are an estimated 255,000 Congolese miners laboring for cobalt, primarily using their hands.
“As global demand for Congolese mineral resources increases, so do the associated dangers that raise red flags for Congolese miners’ human rights,” it said.
And human rights violations aren’t the only concern with cobalt mining. Wilson Center states: “The extraction of DRC mineral resources includes cutting down trees and building roads, negatively impacting the environment and biodiversity … Cobalt mining operations generate incredibly high carbon dioxide and nitrogen dioxide emissions and substantial electricity consumption. These emissions contribute to the fact that Africa produces five percent of carbon dioxide emissions globally.”
Epoch Times PhotoCalifornia Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks in Los Angeles, on Sept. 29, 2021. (John Fredricks/The Epoch Times)
Meanwhile, in California, Newsom extolled his state’s move away from fossil fuels.
“This plan’s yearly targets—35 percent ZEV sales by 2026, 68 percent by 2030, and 100 percent by 2035—provide our roadmap to reducing dangerous carbon emissions and moving away from fossil fuels. That’s 915 million oil barrels’ worth of emissions that won’t pollute our communities.”
Katie Spence

Follow
Katie covers energy and politics for The Epoch Times. Before starting her career as a journalist, Katie proudly served in the Air Force as an Airborne Operations Technician on JSTARS. She obtained her degree in Analytic Philosophy and a minor in Cognitive Studies from the University of Colorado. Katie’s writing has appeared on CNSNews.com, The Maverick Observer, The Motley Fool, First Quarter Finance, The Cheat Sheet, and Investing.com. Email her at [email protected]
Epoch Times is a deeply-biased “newspaper” backed by the Falun-Gong cult. The fact that you keep sourcing these anti-EV articles by fringe sources does not help your case.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,788 Posts
2 wrongs don't make a right. They can't claim that this transition is so great for the environment and then when called out on stuff like this say "but the oil industry is dirty too"
I keep going back to the nature of the pollution. I've not seen anything on this, just my thoughts and I've brought this up before on GMI. To me, mining for BEV raw materials will pollute, but it will be localized (presuming the mine isn't right on the Mississippi river). While emissions from our tailpipe go into the air and circulate everywhere.

Then the next line of argument will be the coal fired power plants. Sure - dirty, but there will be many BEV's powered by nuclear, wind, solar, hydro, etc.. So not all BEV's will be "dirty powered" where 100% of gas powered cars are dirty. And the percentage of clean energy will increase over the years. And yes, I know there are some coal plants scheduled to go online now, but I believe that is today, not tomorrow. And back to those coal powered BEV's - I've not seen anything, but BEV's seem to be a lot more efficient than ICE and certainly power plants will be more efficient at producing electric than an ICE engine, so is a coal powered BEV dirtier than an ICE powered?

Bottom line is we all know it is dangerous for our well being to run an ICE vehicle in a closed garage. So why is it magically ok to have a billion vehicles running outside?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,788 Posts
Epoch Times is a deeply-biased “newspaper” backed by the Falun-Gong cult. The fact that you keep sourcing these anti-EV articles by fringe sources does not help your case.
Wow - I googled The Epoch Times. Scary that this stuff is so prevalent. Just read an article in Businessweek about Russia's disinformation campaign on how sneaky and pervasive it is.

This article will contain some actual facts, but one must understand the source and what conclusion they are trying to guide your thoughts to via all the other facts they left out. This article is 100% pure manipulation. I honestly feel dirty just knowing I read it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,593 Posts
Sounds like an all-too-common scenario, where futures impacts and consequences aren't considered. But they'll fix it. As has been done with the words "vaccine": and "recession," the definitions of "clean water,"'clean air," and even "pollution" will be redefined on government websites.

In 2009, the HQ of climate research, East Anglia University, was hacked. E-mails released. Data showing warm periods in the medieval period was hidden. Data was "fudged" (they actually used that word) to make their climate models produce the results they wanted. And yet this lunacy persists. And the scandal, in the eyes of the BBC, wasn't that the "scientists" blatantly modified data to suit their agenda, it was that the e-mails were hacked.

Yeah I know. Possible punishment on the way for me.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jzchev28 and hq308

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,231 Posts
Sounds like an all-too-common scenario, where futures impacts and consequences aren't considered. But they'll fix it. As has been done with the words "vaccine": and "recession," the definitions of "clean water,"'clean air," and even "pollution" will be redefined on government websites.

In 2009, the HQ of climate research, East Anglia University, was hacked. E-mails released. Data showing warm periods in the medieval period was hidden. Data was "fudged" (they actually used that word) to make their climate models produce the results they wanted. And yet this lunacy persists. And the scandal, in the eyes of the BBC, wasn't that the "scientists" blatantly modified data to suit their agenda, it was that the e-mails were hacked.

Yeah I know. Possible punishment on the way for me.
yeah, it seems certain people on here can get away with saying and posting whatever they want, but if someone else posts a rebuttal, we get a reprimand and the thread is closed. Why is THIS guy allowed to continually create these types of threads, argue with everyone, make disparaging remarks and go off and do it again and again without reprisal?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,593 Posts
Wow - I googled The Epoch Times. Scary that this stuff is so prevalent. Just read an article in Businessweek about Russia's disinformation campaign on how sneaky and pervasive it is.

This article will contain some actual facts, but one must understand the source and what conclusion they are trying to guide your thoughts to via all the other facts they left out. This article is 100% pure manipulation. I honestly feel dirty just knowing I read it.

Do you read CNN or MSNBC or Fox, or heck, any of the mainstream news sources, and not see the manipulation?
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top