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I think a number buyers are little put off by too new a technology. For example on the Bolt and Volt the gear shift has PRNDL. What the heck is "L". There is no transmission or gears. It's the regenerative braking mode. So you drive down the E-way at 75 in L. I little jarring if the car actually had a low gear.

An electric car has no aural or visual cues that the car has started. Its's one of reasons the Lyriq will put on light show went you walk up to it. Likewise, there will be sound and lights when the start button is pushed. It's not because it is needed, but because just like your dog, it's happy to see you. It's reassuring and comforting. I know it sounds silly but people get attached to their cars.
I agree - cars aren't like what they used to be. 50 years ago you'd pick it up and go. Maybe took 5 minutes to figure out where the lights, radio and vent controls are, otherwise you were all good. Now, you need a day long class to understand how to use everything. My salesman offered to spend as much time with me as I wanted to teach me how to use the car - which I think is exactly what is needed. But, I think a lot of people just want to go and either figure it out later or just never use the feature. Wouldn't surprise me if there's a good sized chunk of people who never take the time to figure out how to use many of the features on their car.

I think this is an extreme example, but My aunt (she's 80) has had her Mazda over 5 years and has never opened the sunroof because it's to complicated :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Can you copy and post a couple of the paragraphs with new info?
Here you go:
"This car has got the wheels pushed to every corner," Smith said. "It's got the dash to axle that we all love, and it's got a great stance. It's kind of the car we always wanted to be able to do, but now we actually have the ability to do it."
Unlike other EVs in the market, the Lyriq doesn't have a cargo space beneath the hood, known as a frunk. Instead, Cadillac rearranged components to carve out a large storage compartment in the rear, where the trunk is on a sedan. The front of the vehicle contains a 19.2-kilowatt onboard charging module and a 12-volt battery.

"I wanted this to be as much like a regular car as it could possibly be, just better," Smith said. "The cargo volume you'll see is really, really big. Any modules that we had left over, we've actually packaged them in the front."

The Lyriq is noticeably distinct from gasoline-powered vehicles in other ways.

A standard grille is unnecessary for EVs, but Cadillac designers wanted the Lyriq to have a face. So the front has sensors packaged behind a black-painted surface. When the driver approaches the vehicle, lighting choreography begins with a Cadillac crest in the center and fans out the width of the vehicle.

The Lyriq maintains many traditional brand style cues, but Cadillac differentiated the Lyriq in "the way that they're using lighting to express the modernity of the vehicle and to express how it's leading into the next phase for Cadillac," Brinley said.

In the details
Inside the Lyriq, designers prioritized space and personal touches. They repackaged HVAC systems, moved airbags and lowered instrument panels to make the Lyriq feel spacious. Near the driver is a lined area large enough for a purse or grocery bag and a hidden jewelry box. The additional storage space was available in part because of a unique console design inspired by cantilever balconies, said Tristan Murphy, manager of Cadillac interior design.

"We pulled up images of fictitious buildings you see in movies where they've got these long cantilever balconies. There's something dramatic and very exciting when you see something like that," he said. The team thought, "How do we evoke some of those same feelings, even on a subconscious level, that are going to give you that drama?"

The Lyriq has seat controls on the door, rather than the side of the seat. The relocation was an engineering challenge but allows for wider seats and is more convenient for the driver.

Various Cadillac emblems appear throughout the Lyriq. Designers visited GM's Heritage Center for inspiration.

"If you know more about the history of what you own, then you kind of feel like you're a little bit of that club," Brinley said. "Those little bits communicate an attention to detail. They communicate a passion and an interest in the brand and what they're doing."
 

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I wouldn't go throwing the owners manual.
Well time to hang it up at GMI you lost someone's respect, someone who happens to know everything and how GMI needs to operate going forward. It was nice knowing you!
 
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The Lyriq has seat controls on the door, rather than the side of the seat. The relocation was an engineering challenge but allows for wider seats and is more convenient for the driver.
Funny, I don't think I'd be calling that out as a challenge as a lot of other manufacturers do that. Either way, I'm so used to them being on the side of the seat that I almost don't want them to move it.
 

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Funny, I don't think I'd be calling that out as a challenge as a lot of other manufacturers do that. Either way, I'm so used to them being on the side of the seat that I almost don't want them to move it.
I don't like it that they change things like that, but after a few short weeks of being in a different car you find yourself adapting and it's all just fine. One of the worst "changes" was getting used to the gas gauge in my ATS. I like the steering wheel tilted down all the way, but it obscures the gauge, and I forget to check it. Almost ran out a couple of times, so I've had to "adapt" and make an effort to look.
 

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Funny, I don't think I'd be calling that out as a challenge as a lot of other manufacturers do that. Either way, I'm so used to them being on the side of the seat that I almost don't want them to move it.
Didn't older Cadillacs have the power seat switches on the doors though? I know older Lincolns did. I personally would rather they be on the door I wish my MKZ fell in line like the rest of the Lincoln lineup and moved them but it was one of those "legacy" products and never happened.

One thing though I always found odd was the rear power seat switches on the CT6 are in the arm rest and not on the doors like the front seats which I thought was poor placement almost every large sedan that has rear power seat switches puts them on the door. In the rare instance you have 3 across the back seat you then cannot access the rear seat controls at all.
 

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Funny, I don't think I'd be calling that out as a challenge as a lot of other manufacturers do that. Either way, I'm so used to them being on the side of the seat that I almost don't want them to move it.
It's not so much an engineering challenge, as a cost and complexity challenge.

Seats are separate bolt in assemblies. To run the controls out to the doors means several extra feet of wiring, and some more connections to be made. Certainly, it can be done. But is it worth it?
 

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I don't like it that they change things like that, but after a few short weeks of being in a different car you find yourself adapting and it's all just fine. One of the worst "changes" was getting used to the gas gauge in my ATS. I like the steering wheel tilted down all the way, but it obscures the gauge, and I forget to check it. Almost ran out a couple of times, so I've had to "adapt" and make an effort to look.
Agreed! No doubt I'd quickly learn and like the new controls. But, the controls on the seat side seems like such a GM thing, like the door chime all GM's had for my whole life until recently, it's almost a shame for it to change.

Didn't older Cadillacs have the power seat switches on the doors though? I know older Lincolns did. I personally would rather they be on the door I wish my MKZ fell in line like the rest of the Lincoln lineup and moved them but it was one of those "legacy" products and never happened.

One thing though I always found odd was the rear power seat switches on the CT6 are in the arm rest and not on the doors like the front seats which I thought was poor placement almost every large sedan that has rear power seat switches puts them on the door. In the rare instance you have 3 across the back seat you then cannot access the rear seat controls at all.
I don't know where the seat controls are on older Cadillac's, but wouldn't surprise me if they were on the door - clearly a cost cutting thing to have them on the seat - I bet Cadillac of 50 years ago would've spent the extra money to put them on the door.

It's not so much an engineering challenge, as a cost and complexity challenge.

Seats are separate bolt in assemblies. To run the controls out to the doors means several extra feet of wiring, and some more connections to be made. Certainly, it can be done. But is it worth it?
No disagreements there - cutting costs to have them on the seat, but I see the logic to it as well.
 

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I don't like it that they change things like that, but after a few short weeks of being in a different car you find yourself adapting and it's all just fine. One of the worst "changes" was getting used to the gas gauge in my ATS. I like the steering wheel tilted down all the way, but it obscures the gauge, and I forget to check it. Almost ran out a couple of times, so I've had to "adapt" and make an effort to look.
That's an easy adaptation. My 6spd Formula, 6spd RS Camaro and 7spd Corvette all have reverse in a DIFFERENT location. Hopping between the three is truly a mental challenge, albeit one that comes with many smiles!!
 
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That's an easy adaptation. My 6spd Formula, 6spd RS Camaro and 7spd Corvette all have reverse in a DIFFERENT location. Hopping between the three is truly a mental challenge, albeit one that comes with many smiles!!
First world problems! I wish I had to worry about that...
 
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First world problems! I wish I had to worry about that...
It's great to be an empty nester with a self motivated daughter!!
 

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Agreed! No doubt I'd quickly learn and like the new controls. But, the controls on the seat side seems like such a GM thing, like the door chime all GM's had for my whole life until recently, it's almost a shame for it to change.
Mercedes have had seat controls on the door forever, so I have no idea why this is a challenge or anything of consequence.

I agree - cars aren't like what they used to be. 50 years ago you'd pick it up and go. Maybe took 5 minutes to figure out where the lights, radio and vent controls are, otherwise you were all good.
I think it took me longer to figure out the Scorpio than the XTS because there's so much weird non-intuitive stuff going on.
Consulted the owners manual many times thinking something was broken when it was really just goofy.
It was pretty early on in the electronic controls game, so they really hadn't yet figured out the ergo part of them.
But you get a handle on it after awhile. I've got all of the quirks down.

With all of this fancy new tech coming to EVs, I'm sure similar head scratching will occur.
 

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That's an easy adaptation. My 6spd Formula, 6spd RS Camaro and 7spd Corvette all have reverse in a DIFFERENT location. Hopping between the three is truly a mental challenge, albeit one that comes with many smiles!!
I am so glad the manual transmission has been on a downward slide for the last 30 years. Performance should matter, and for about the last 20 years automatic transmissions have posted faster shifts and faster 0 to 60 and 1/4 mile times in Performance applications. Hopefully the industry finally moves away from the manual transmissions in the future.

And for your reference, I grew up driving manual transmissions. I just choose the better Performance option.
 

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And for your reference, I grew up driving manual transmissions. I just choose the better Performance option.
Clearly you don't enjoy rowing your own any longer. On the twisty rural roads I live amongst it's quite engaging and engine braking is used often on the hilly terrain. I have plenty of automatic options as well but mostly chose the sticks for my daily. To each his own.
 
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