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And it seems as though anyone else with an ounce of common sense has replied to reiterate that the jack is for emergencies only. If you're working on your vehicle in the garage, driveway, etc., you should be using a floor jack with jack stands. No excuses.
 

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...and my cat's breath smells like cat food. But unsafe designs don't automatically become safe in an emergency, particularly when said emergency typically occurs away from a controlled level environment with a hard flat surface, like your garage.
 
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This is hard to believe. An old fashioned bumper jack would be safer. There is no slot, tab, or cradle for the jack to make positive contact with the axle. Even if all the wheels are blocked, it seems that if you microscopically move the car by bumping it when you mount the wheel or shutting a door or the jack base moves on soft ground, the axle might slip off. You hope it's not a windy day. Not providing a jack at all is better. There has to be some other explanation.
 

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Arrrgh. The jacks from OEMs have always been on the flemsy side. a Good breeze could knock this stilt over if you let it:



The fact remains that the jacks provided should only be used to clear enough room for the wheel to be off the ground enough to remove and replaced. Spin the lugnuts slightly snug, and all tightening should be done one the tire touches the ground itself. Could this thread be a simple attempt at nitpicking in light of the General's recent situation? I think yes.
 

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I never had an issue with bumper jacks stability, they were much more solid than some of the stuff today. Its also the style of choice as a hi-lift by off roaders to help get unstuck.

Never liked when they expected them to be used on Endura bumpers, like my bro's '79 Firebird. Still remember the illustration in the manual of the gross deformation that would occur, can't seem to find a pic online.

My criticism of Audi's flimsy jack was also a simple attempt at nitpicking GM's 'recent situation' :)
 

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Arrrgh. The jacks from OEMs have always been on the flemsy side. a Good breeze could knock this stilt over if you let it:



The fact remains that the jacks provided should only be used to clear enough room for the wheel to be off the ground enough to remove and replaced. Spin the lugnuts slightly snug, and all tightening should be done one the tire touches the ground itself. Could this thread be a simple attempt at nitpicking in light of the General's recent situation? I think yes.
Absolutely! AND, if a "temporary" jack that met some peoples' requirements as "safe", it would add both weight and cost to the price of the vehicle, and they would STILL complain. Yes, THIS definitely qualifies as nitpicking.
 

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I must also add that, in my over forty years of driving and car ownership, I have yet to witness a vehicle jack that I consider "safe", regardless of make. McGiver would figure out a way to change a flat tire WITHOUT a jack. Block and tackle anyone?
 

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EXTRA EXTRA! A GMI poster just noticed a jack supplied to buyers of all Fullsize GM trucks since 1999 isn't for regular garage use! GM to recall 28 million trucks!!

Are you serious?
He was pointing out how the jack design is hazardous on a flat level surface and then contrasted that with the fact that the shoulders of roadways are not level and flat.
Making the jack design a more serious safety risk under proper and temporary (flat changing) use.
In my first post I commented that at least Jeep makes theirs with a tip designed to cradle the axle tube.
Jeep isn't smarter than GM, just apparently not as cheap.
 

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I used my '15 HD jack on the cross member of my '70 c-10 & it lifted the entire front end s I could remove both front wheels at the same time. I shoved a pair of jack stands under the frame rails immediately also. That said, it is a considerably lighter truck! They aren't the best jacks for sure, but they do get the job done, you just have to be a bit creative
 

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EXTRA EXTRA! A GMI poster just noticed a jack supplied to buyers of all Fullsize GM trucks since 1999 isn't for regular garage use! GM to recall 28 million trucks!!

Are you serious?
He was pointing out how the jack design is hazardous on a flat level surface and then contrasted that with the fact that the shoulders of roadways are not level and flat.
Making the jack design a more serious safety risk under proper and temporary (flat changing) use.
In my first post I commented that at least Jeep makes theirs with a tip designed to cradle the axle tube.
Jeep isn't smarter than GM, just apparently not as cheap.
Read. The hazardous killer jack has been sold for 15 plus years with one of the best selling vehicles. This isn't news.

Some absolutely ridiculous posters were getting so stupid that one even claimed that the jack could effect there $30g+ purchase of a vehicle. ;)

And designing the top to he a cup vs flat wouldn't cost anymore. So your deductive reasoning isn't even functioning.

As an aside I've used that death object three times over the years and am typing with all ten fingers.

This topic is silly. Some of the posts were sillier.

PS: you messed up the quote.


Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

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Of the cars i have owned the only with a jack that I thought was well thought out and executed was the Alfa-sud. It had a scissor jack with a spike on top that went in to either of four strengthened holes under the car. The one that was worst was in my 1975 BMW. The one my current car is OK but the handle used to wind it up is less than stellar in its operation.
 

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That's a very stupid jack design. If it's meant to jack a vehicle, even if it's a rare occurence, it should be deigned to do so safely. It wouldn't take much to add a partly rounded or V shape to better sit under the axle, and that would make all the difference.
They DO have a formed top that fits under the axle. It's not a giant cup like a 3 ton jack but it is enough if you block the wheels and set the brake like the instructions say to do.
 

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I pulled my Silverado into the garage today to install new Chevy mudflaps on the rear wheel wells. Naturally, this gave me the chance to get acquainted with the jack system of the new truck.

I could not believe how totally dangerous, stupid, and poorly thought out the Chevy jack is. Anyone who has to change a rear tire out on the road, like where it usually must be done, off on a soft shoulder, or slight incline, etc etc., is surely taking a chance with their life. First, the jack needs to be fully extended straight up before it gets anywhere close to the axle, and in compliance with the directions diagram. Next, the top of the jack has no contact with a flat surface, it must contact the round axle! If you get that far without the thing slipping off guess what, you've extended the jack to its limit but the tire is barely half an inch off the ground.

I wouldn't use this jack on a concrete garage floor without first inserting some protection, like jack stands, underneath. What bleepin' morons!!

View attachment 22817
It seems you only had the jack extended HALF its possible length. (bleepin' morons)

Automotive tire Automotive exterior Rim Alloy wheel Automotive wheel system
 

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I pulled my Silverado into the garage today to install new Chevy mudflaps on the rear wheel wells. Naturally, this gave me the chance to get acquainted with the jack system of the new truck.

I could not believe how totally dangerous, stupid, and poorly thought out the Chevy jack is. Anyone who has to change a rear tire out on the road, like where it usually must be done, off on a soft shoulder, or slight incline, etc etc., is surely taking a chance with their life. First, the jack needs to be fully extended straight up before it gets anywhere close to the axle, and in compliance with the directions diagram. Next, the top of the jack has no contact with a flat surface, it must contact the round axle! If you get that far without the thing slipping off guess what, you've extended the jack to its limit but the tire is barely half an inch off the ground.

I wouldn't use this jack on a concrete garage floor without first inserting some protection, like jack stands, underneath. What bleepin' morons!!

View attachment 22817
They were crap on the T900s as well.....as I found out during rush hour traffic on the side of the interstate one day. Definitely get a hydraulic jack if you own a GM truck. It will add weight and cost to your vehicle purchase, but you can't trust GM to make safe products these days out of the box.
 
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