GM Inside News Forum banner

1 - 1 of 1 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
DETROIT - General Motors today enters into the last phase of its Hot Button marketing program with a second-chance drawing that gives consumers another opportunity to win any of the unclaimed vehicles. Those consumers who were not winners can register for the second-chance drawing through March 15, 2004. Hot Button, GM’s ground-breaking marketing initiative invited Americans out of the cold and into their local GM dealership in January and February to push the OnStar "Hot Button" for a chance to win 1,000 2004 GM vehicles.

With the second-chance drawing, consumers who didn’t win after playing the game at their local dealer still have a chance to win a new GM vehicle. To enter this drawing, eligible players must complete the second-chance entry form that is available at GM dealerships or print their name, address, city, state, zip code, e-mail address and home phone number on a 3x5 card and mail it in. Details on how to enter the second-chance drawing are available at www.gm.com/hotbutton. Consumers must be 21 years of age, have a valid driver’s license and be a legal resident of the U.S. Second-chance entries will go into one pool from which winners of the remaining vehicles will be selected. The drawing will take place the week of March 15, and winners will be notified by mail. It is not necessary to have played the Hot Button game at a GM dealership to enter the second-chance drawing.

During the 56-day promotion there were about 2 million game plays and approximately 650 vehicles were won. That means that nearly 2 percent of the households in the country participated, or more than 10 times the number of people who attended the Daytona 500.

Hot Button drove a large number of competitive-vehicle owners into GM dealerships. More than 40 percent of the people who played Hot Button were non-GM owners. Research indicated that perceptions of the company were improved for 50 percent of Hot Button participants, and more than 50 percent of players expect to purchase a new vehicle within the next 12 months.

"Not only did we expose owners of competitive vehicles to GM’s product portfolio," said Steve Hill, director, GM Retail Planning & GM Brand. "But, we also know that many of the players plan to purchase a vehicle sometime this year. We believe Hot Button will help to put GM high on their shopping list."

GM Hot Button winners came from 49 states and ranged in age from 21 to 91. The winner’s stories are as different as the vehicles they won.

George Douglas of Hartsville, S.C., celebrated his 65th birthday by buying himself a Cadillac CTS as a retirement present. One week later, the former welding company employee was invited back to the dealership and won a Cadillac XLR. When the weather warms, Douglas will put the top down and drive cross-country to visit his grandchildren.

Another winner, Officer Bill Altman is based in Fort Rucker, Ala. He is responsible for training Blackhawk helicopter pilots who fly in Iraq. For land travel, Altman now will be driving a Chevrolet Blazer.

Brett Byer of Knox, Ind. recently took a day off from his job to look for a used truck. After a frustrating day of shopping and failing to find a vehicle that fit his price range, Byer’s last stop was at Tim Martin Buick Pontiac GMC, Plymouth, Ind. He was about to leave the dealership when on a whim he decided to play the game. Much to his surprise, the GM Hot Button operator told him that he was a winner. Byer won’t be driving a used truck any longer. He won a 2004 GMC Sierra.

Dealers around the country related a wide variety of success stories to Hot Button. David Mills, president of Mills Chevrolet in Moline, Ill. held an event to celebrate his winner of a Silverado. "This was a spectacular event that really captured this interest of the local community," Mills said. "We are generating really significant floor traffic, and everywhere I go people ask me about the promotion. Hot Button is red hot in Moline!"
 
1 - 1 of 1 Posts
Top