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Automotive News
January 19, 2023

(GM) has created a two-door pickup with a 4 to 4.5 foot-long bed and low roofline.

The pickup, seen by Automotive News Wednesday at GM's affordable EV design studio
in Warren, MI., is futuristic and sporty.
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GM is conducting a feasibility study on the feasibility of building a small truck, if feasible it could be feasible to build the truck in ten years if all feasibility studies conclude the feasibility of building a feasible small truck.
 

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GM is conducting a feasibility study on the feasibility of building a small truck, if feasible it could be feasible to build the truck in ten years if all feasibility studies conclude the feasibility of building a feasible small truck.
That sounds like malfeasance. Why not a compact 2 door with an extendable cab and an extendable bed. The bed should be easy. Just pancake another bed under the standard bed. The cab, a little harder. I'll get to work on that.
 

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Looks like the reason behind GM benchmarking the Maverick is confirmed.

Also, is this correct?
seen by Automotive News Wednesday at GM's affordable EV design studio
Assuming this isn’t a typo, GM has a separate design studio for affordable EVs?

Seems like an odd choice to partition your high-end and mainstream design studios but if it works, why not?
 

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Sounds like GM is going back in the compact car business...with a pickup truck of course.

Where is the GM compact EV car?

Wonder if Honda will share the next generation Civic with GM as GM is sharing its NG compact SUV with Honda?

I've brought this up before, and I'm not really sure how this is going to play out at GM — or any other automaker for that matter.

Today, subcompact and compact cars are often viewed as the entry level vehicles, as well as "economy" cars — both in price and fuel consumption.
But in the future, subcompact and compact EV cars may not necessarily be the leaders in economy or charging speed/capacity or range, simply because the batteries will be physically smaller.

I think there needs to be a market wide mindset shift in how these compact cars are perceived. I think the latest and greatest batter tech will remain in the high end. And the old battery tech will cascade down the line to the entry level cars. But that also means bringing down the costs of the batteries. But EV compact cars won't have the "high range" and affordability factor that ICE compacts cars have today.
 

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There is still a chip shortage.

Chip makers shut down old chip factories(fabs) that made the old low tech chips used in large quantities by automakers.

Tesla decided to switch on the fly and right new firmware for many applications.

Traditional automakers insist on a time consuming validation process and refuse to use the higher tech chips without that validation process and prefer to still use the old tried and true old tech chips.

There will be new fabs opening up here in the USA and elsewhere in 2024 that automakers can use in their validated chip boards.

Then there is the war in Ukraine. Ukraine is a major supplier of xenon and krypton gasses used in the production of chips.
 

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There is still a chip shortage.

Chip makers shut down old chip factories(fabs) that made the old low tech chips used in large quantities by automakers.

Tesla decided to switch on the fly and right new firmware for many applications. ....
It is easier to deal with a chip shortage with EVs. An electric powertrain requires next to nothing in electronic chips, while an ICE powertrain is heavily laden with electronic chips to improve efficiency and emissions issues (that electric motors don't have).

But outside the powertrain there are (in EVs and ICEVs) a great deal of chips used to control a lot of vehicle functions (and quite a bit of gadgetry) common to both.

But the idea of redesigning (and re validating) your systems every year or so to match the semiconductor's latest and greatest is an endless series of redesigns for a product that should be in production (relatively) unchanged for many years.

Switching on the fly is of course done all the time in the automotive industry, but constant redesign (for no real product improvement) costs money, raising prices for vehicles. Constantly redesigned (and more expensive) chips are just more "inefficiency".
 
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