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2015 Holden Commodore unveiled
www.caradvice.com.au

The 2015 Holden Commodore has been unveiled with a range of updates including new colours, paddleshifters and a range of other minor improvements.

Since its launch in May 2013, the Holden VF Commodore has gone on the dominate the shrinking large car segment, currently commanding an impressive 72 per cent market share ahead of the Ford Falcon and Toyota Aurion.

So far in 2014, Commodore sales are up 26.5 percent compared with the same period last year (Jan-Sep). The 2015 Commodore updates are set to ensure the dominance remains strong ahead of the updated Ford Falcon launch later this year.

Given the VF Commodore has only been around for 17 months, the changes to the MY15 are mostly incremental improvements with no changes to the drivetrain.

From the outside the sporty versions (SV6, SS, SS V and SS V Redline sedans only) gain an update to the rear end, with a new gloss black rear valance. SS V models also gain new 19-inch split-rim alloy wheels.

Two new bright new colours have also been introduced with “Jungle Green” for sports models and “Some Like It Hot” red (available across the range) to become the new hero hues.

Inside, the SS V redline gains a new standard jet black finish with optional titanium highlights while automatic models gain paddle-shifters. The reverse-view camera has been updated with grid lines.

The rest of the range gain a recalibrated and retuned Electronic Power Steering (EPS) system, with Holden claiming a better on-centre steering feel and precision.

Read more here

 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Hmm, quite minor changes for now. I'm disappointed that the ventilated seats don't appear to have been added to any of the range. Another addition that wasn't mentioned in this story is the black wrap roof on the Redline when you choose Red Hot, Heron or Jungle Green.

I do like the new Redline alloys though. Much better than the old ones but an option for non-black wheels would have been nice.

 

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I would have liked the gloss back valence and the gridlines on the reversing camera, but otherwise I did alright with my SV6. The changes seem limited to the Redline.
 

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In case anyone was interested, but didn't have time to do the conversions (I'm taking a break), in US currency:

The base Ute with the V6 runs $29,407,
The Ute with the V8 starts at $34,668
The Redline version (roughly what the Chevrolet SS sedan is here) starts at $43,009

Perspectives:

Currently, the Aussie dollar is worth 88 cents US today.

The Aussie dollar was worth just 55 cents when the Monaro was approved for export as the Pontiac GTO back in 2002.

It was 68 cents the start of the final year of importing the GTO the fall of 2003.

It was worth about 75 cents when GM first decided to bring the Commodore over as the G8 in 2006.

The exchange rate was $1.45 in January 2009 when GM pulled the plug on the Pontiac G8 ST (the Pontiac version of the Ute),

The value had dropped down to 88 cents in 2009 when GM announced they would import the Caprice PPV.

It was back up to 97 cents in 2011 when GM was considering bringing the Commodore over as the Chevrolet SS.

It was even higher at $1.04 the day the Chevrolet SS sedan was unveiled at Daytona.

It was at 94 cents when GM decided to end manufacturing Holdens in Australia.

......even at that amount, it cost about 75% more to manufacture a car in Australia today than it did when the GTO came out, discounting both inflation and additional regulations.....nothing more than simply the increased value of the Aussie dollar.
 

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In case anyone was interested, but didn't have time to do the conversions (I'm taking a break), in US currency:

The base Ute with the V6 runs $29,407,
The Ute with the V8 starts at $34,668
The Redline version (roughly what the Chevrolet SS sedan is here) starts at $43,009

Perspectives:

Currently, the Aussie dollar is worth 88 cents US today.

The Aussie dollar was worth just 55 cents when the Monaro was approved for export as the Pontiac GTO back in 2002.

It was 68 cents the start of the final year of importing the GTO the fall of 2003.

It was worth about 75 cents when GM first decided to bring the Commodore over as the G8 in 2006.

The exchange rate was $1.45 in January 2009 when GM pulled the plug on the Pontiac G8 ST (the Pontiac version of the Ute),

The value had dropped down to 88 cents in 2009 when GM announced they would import the Caprice PPV.

It was back up to 97 cents in 2011 when GM was considering bringing the Commodore over as the Chevrolet SS.

It was even higher at $1.04 the day the Chevrolet SS sedan was unveiled at Daytona.

It was at 94 cents when GM decided to end manufacturing Holdens in Australia.

......even at that amount, it cost about 75% more to manufacture a car in Australia today than it did when the GTO came out, discounting both inflation and additional regulations.....nothing more than simply the increased value of the Aussie dollar.
That's actually rubbish. It costs less in real terms - imported components and especially expensive ones like drivelines and ECUs are actually cheaper with a high $Au - and the majority, the vast majority of cars are still sold here.

Even a V6 Commodore has either an imported Aisin manual or 6L45 GM PT auto trans. Contracts are still written in US dollars. The whole workforce had a wagefreeze for nearly a decade, only just lifted. Because of it's modular construction and assembly Zeta is estimated to cost nearly 20% less per vehicle than the previous gen due to more automation and the new line - workforce dropped by 15% in 2006.

They saved 8 minutes per car - at it's peak that's 2 full time employees per shift - on the driveline insertion line, alone. During the GTO/G8 era GM Powertrain would have been exporting probably 60K V8 engines and trans to Australia for domestic and G8 plus Middle East production - let's say $3500 per unit, conservatively. That's $210 Mill. GM PT US has just lost that business, because if the next Commodore comes from Germany, it will probably be with European drivelines. That's probably more than 10% of the V8s GM will sell per annum in future. That makes it harder incrementally to justifty more R&D on the venerable smallblock...... Plus, all the engine blocks and heads for V6s, plus all V6 auto trans @ 100K per annum. So that's another $0.25Bill per annum GM PT is worse off. And that volume is not going to be replaced with commensurate value from Europe.

Cars exported from Australia cost more to their receiving countries. But here VE went up hardly any from the preceding model. And Series II and VF prices both went down. A VF SS-V is nearly $10K cheaper than the VE SS-V on intro.

Holden retail prices above include 10% GST - it is illegal in Australia to advertise any price without it. So the base Ute cost is actually $US26 ex-tax, and that's with a dollar at nearly US90c - surprise, surprise, not all that different from a Colorado which presumably has massive economies of scale in comparison. The base V8 Ute costs $US31K ext tax, the SS-V Redline (which has a bit 'more' than the SS even without the LS3) costs $39K ex tax.

And now, as was inevitable, as the US economy recovers and the Eu economies stop getting worse; plus the end to the mining boom looms and consumer confidence collapses taking spending with it, the $Au is migrating back down to where it should be, in the US75-80c range. Great time to kill local manufacture and start an import-only business.........

Holden has always been able to ride out currency fluctuations. Since day one. They hit their heights when the Au dollar was at less than US50c, and 40 GB Pence because that was the era of the Holden Astra (which was $21K in 2002 base 1.8 5-speed manual, vs $23K in 2012 1.4 Turbo 6-speed manual) and the VX Commodore which started at about $32K for an auto V6.

VX Commodore - MY 2000
Executive sedan auto - $32,680 (now Evoke)
S sedan - $34,530 (now SV6) (5M)
Commodore SS - $45,290 (base SS, cloth seats)
Holden Calais (V6) $46,680
Calais V8 - $50,820

VF on introduction 2013:
Evoke - $34,990
SV6 - $35,990 (6M)
Commodore SS - $41,990 (base SS, cloth seats)
Holden Calais (V6) $39,990
Calais V V8 - $52,990

Bear in mind - a VX in 2002 had a 4-speed auto, and V6s 5-speed manuals. VXs had maybe 8 or 9 computers. A VF has between 20 and 30. The amount of content in a base VF - CD/MP3 player vs AF/FM radio in VX, colour touchscreen satnav standard, standard aircon, 5 star ANCAP, HFV6 vs iron OHV 3800, 6 airbags vs 2, mutlink IRS both ends vs Macphersons/semi-trailing arms, ESC, ABS, EBD, BA, six speed trans in every model, aluminium suspension, bonnet, bootlid etc etc etc etc etc.

A VF Calais V (V8) is also much > than a VX Calais V8, which was just a tickbox option - it has the HUD for starters. Allowing for inflation, a VX would probably cost $60K in 2014 dollars.
 

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Yay gridlines are back :woot: May not seem like a big deal, but I use them all the time on my wagon.
It is the only disappointment I have with my VF. I had test driven VE's with it, and just assumed that the VF I test drove had something set wrong. I wonder can I update the program to the series II version ?
 

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During the GTO/G8 era GM Powertrain would have been exporting probably 60K V8 engines and trans to Australia for domestic and G8 plus Middle East production - let's say $3500 per unit, conservatively.
HFV6 turbo sold to Opel (and Saab used to buy them as well, and they did the turbo design) is ~ AU $7800 CIP (carriage and insurance paid). So I wouldn't expect the V8 to cost half that.

And to put the above prices into a perspective, Australian minimum wage is $17 per hour (US $15, GBP 9.30, €11.80).
 

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Look , I'll need to buy groceries next Spring , God willing , so while I'm out and about , stop in the the GM dealership and pick up a hot green sedan , same in the little two seater ute and a fire engine red station wagon . The only problem here is , next time I'm off to the market , WHICH ONE DO I DRIVE ?? What a dilemmmmmmmma !! GM should have them imported into the country , you know , by when the daffodills and tulips are in bloom and the snow angels in my front yard have vanished , right ??
 

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Jealous......damn Aussies and there nice "muscle cars." LOL. There is a reason you kicked BBC's Top Gear ass when they came down years ago to do "which country makes the best cars? U.K. or Australia"
 

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Funny they should use Seattle's Skyline as a back drop.
 

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Hmm, quite minor changes for now. I'm disappointed that the ventilated seats don't appear to have been added to any of the range. Another addition that wasn't mentioned in this story is the black wrap roof on the Redline when you choose Red Hot, Heron or Jungle Green.

I do like the new Redline alloys though. Much better than the old ones but an option for non-black wheels would have been nice.

Those are nice wheels, they totally need to be an option for the SS sedan here in the states.
 

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In case anyone was interested, but didn't have time to do the conversions (I'm taking a break), in US currency:

The base Ute with the V6 runs $29,407,
The Ute with the V8 starts at $34,668
The Redline version (roughly what the Chevrolet SS sedan is here) starts at $43,009

Perspectives:

Currently, the Aussie dollar is worth 88 cents US today.

The Aussie dollar was worth just 55 cents when the Monaro was approved for export as the Pontiac GTO back in 2002.

It was 68 cents the start of the final year of importing the GTO the fall of 2003.

It was worth about 75 cents when GM first decided to bring the Commodore over as the G8 in 2006.

The exchange rate was $1.45 in January 2009 when GM pulled the plug on the Pontiac G8 ST (the Pontiac version of the Ute),

The value had dropped down to 88 cents in 2009 when GM announced they would import the Caprice PPV.

It was back up to 97 cents in 2011 when GM was considering bringing the Commodore over as the Chevrolet SS.

It was even higher at $1.04 the day the Chevrolet SS sedan was unveiled at Daytona.

It was at 94 cents when GM decided to end manufacturing Holdens in Australia.

......even at that amount, it cost about 75% more to manufacture a car in Australia today than it did when the GTO came out, discounting both inflation and additional regulations.....nothing more than simply the increased value of the Aussie dollar.
You forgot the other side of the coin. All the raw material and products (like windscreens) that are bought in USD were considerable cheaper in AUD terms (where most of the vehicles are sold) when the exchange rate was 1.04 than they are now.
To put that in context if there is USD12,000 worth of raw material/imported product @ 1.10 this cost Holden AUD10,909 but at 0.84 it costs them AUD14,285.
 

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I disagree...

...to a point.

If the paddles are just to send the autobox a change up (or change down) signal its all a bit of a wink (sic). If I am going to swap 'cogs' manually, I want the change to occur as I work the lever/ switch/ paddle. Not after the computer makes sure the stars are aligned properly.

With the ute I find using manual change a bit naff. It can be more entertaining in sport mode, particularly after a few corners spinning the motor up to the redline, because the autobox changes in the same rev range I would, but if you put it in full manual the changes do not coincide with the tap on the lever.

If they can get that right then let me at it!
 
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