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I recently had the "permanent" fix done to the fuel rail and injectors on my '99 Yukon. Three days later I'm climbing a steep grade (241 toll road from the 91 if you are in So.Cal.). Check engine light comes on and the motor stumbles (misfires) for a bit. I take it right back to the dealer thinking it's the same problem. Now he tells me that since toll roads are not federally regulated the grade was too steep. The steep grade caused a defect in the motor to show itself. He says that any time I’m climbing with 75% throttle, 3000RPM or higher an exhaust valve will stick open causing a misfire and check engine light(didn’t know truck motors weren’t built to climb hills). So, the prognosis is a sticking exhaust valve guide (supposedly a known problem with the Vortec) which occurs between 20K and 100K miles. Fix is a $1200 valve job. Amazing. I called GMC and they offered to cover the work after a $200 deductible which I will gladly pay.

Has anyone else had this problem fixed?

Does this seem a bit fishy?

Should I trust this motor after the GM Dealer mechanic gets done tearing off my heads and putting them back together?

Should I retire this Vortec before I loose a tranny, have a leaking head gasket, and any other weaknesses in the Vortec series motor start showing up?

Maybe it’s time upgrade to that new suburban?


Confused – A devoted GM owner.

Thanks - Steve
 

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Well, I wouldn't trust that dealer. I know the spot you're talking about, and that grade has nothing on the "Siskiyous" on the I-5 going from California into Oregon. The motor may have a problem, but saying the grade is too steep, what an idiot.
 

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Originally posted by SoCalYukon@Jan 29 2004, 11:56 AM
Maybe it’s time upgrade to that new suburban?
Considering its almost time for 2005 models, your Yukon is almost 6 years old. But still, it should have lasted longer...

If I was you and in the market for a new GM SUV, I'd consider taking a test drive in a long wheelbase Envoy / Rainier / Ascender. I test drove one recently and they are solid, sweet vehicles, even with only the thriftier Inline 6. I hate the interior of the Trailblazer, so I won't rec. that one. If I had the dough, I'd get an Ascender with that 5 year warranty that will be honored by GM. Right now I'm sure you'd be loving a 5 year warranty.

Or keep your Yukon, and trade it in NEXT summer for a new Suburban, when the redesigned 2006 model vehicles hit.
 

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Sounds like the dealer was throwing you a curve ball hoping you'd strike out and he'd walk away with your hard earned money. The dealer I bought my 95 Sonoma has tried to get away with this type of BS. Needles to say I won't be buying from him anymore. It's amazing how greed can ruin a once good relationship. And the sad part about it this dealer knows that I would not fall for this BS but like I said "Greed can trump common sense"!
 

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The grade thing doesn't make any sense. You didn't mention that you were towing, so I'm assuming that you were solo. No matter how steep this grade was, I'm sure that the engine is pulling much, much harder on lesser "federally regulated" grades when pulling a good size trailer.

I dragged my boat up some fair grades with my '98 Tahoe where the motor was pulling hard above 3000 rpms for a while, and it never missed a beat. Your's kind of sounds like a fluke.
 
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