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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
what types of media do you use? Especially for the work done on paper, and if you can post a link or an image to a sample.

I am trying to hone my skills a little more. Hopefully I will have time to enter this next contest.

Thanks
 
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Works on paper...( plain white stock unlined sheets and/or tracing paper works the best for me) are tipically done with pencil (colored pencils), markers, or pastels. Watercolors also are good, and acrylics can be used for more painted works as well.
If you want to get real OLD SCHOOL, and have the patience and time, I have seen very nice works done in oil paints on canvas, however acrylics dry much faster.

These media can all be scanned into adobe photo imaging products or other software programs and rendered out there too, if you want to after doing a drawing. If you start
in image prossesing programs, you can "chop" pictures as is the practice here for many.

Hope that helps you get an idea of "your media", pick what suits your style of working.
There is no one best way, you will find the one's that work best for you with practice.
 

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If you wanting to become a car designer or anything that is artisticly related you must learn to draw and draw correctly. There is nothing worse than taking a bad drawing and trying to embelish it with color because a bad drawing will always be a bad drawing. So before you go nuts in Photoshop take a step back and evaluate your drawing. A black & white sketch will always go farther and speak volumes more than any rendering.
So take a pencil/pen/marker and sit down with a stack of copy paper and draw, draw, draw.
 

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Torred is 100% correct about making sure the actual drawing is correct before messing with color. You've got to nail the perspective FIRST!

But to answer your question:

Linework:
I use 14x17 Beinfang Graphix 360 Marker paper (semi-translucent) for most of my renderings. Overlays are the secret to sharpening up perspective if you are a beginner. Get a ton of ellipse templates, and buy or make ships curves ($$$$$$$$) to make your linework sharp and deliberate looking. NEVER, EVER use a dull pencil. It'll look like crap. I blow through electric pencil sharpeners like no one's business so get a good one, you won't regret it. Sometimes I only use a cheapo Bic or Pilot Razor Point II pen and get cool results. Get a gum eraser (pull it apart and shape it like clay) and Magic Rub white erasers.

Shading:
Chartpak AD markers are expensive but are the only real choice. Pantone makes cool ones that offer 3 tips but they are super expensive and don't fill or blend well. Prismacolor markers are total garbage. However, they have the best colored pencils and Pastels (for gradiations). Another good thing to have is Sharpie markers.

Highlights (AKA Pigeon Poop):
Get separate boxes of white Prismacolor colored pencils and use white gouache paint for intense light spots.

Best word of advice I can give: Buy "How to Draw Cars Like a Pro" by Thom Taylor. He goes over everything!

Don't be affraid to make messes. That's how you learn what works and what doesn't. Draw some black linework, make a million copies and practice 'til your arm pretty much falls off. Study other drawings in mags or on this forum and try to copy styles. Draw, Draw, Draw. It takes literally years. Be patient.

Good luck!
 

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Dabanj6 said:
Torred is 100% correct about making sure the actual drawing is correct before messing with color. You've got to nail the perspective FIRST!

But to answer your question:

Linework:
I use 14x17 Beinfang Graphix 360 Marker paper (semi-translucent) for most of my renderings. Overlays are the secret to sharpening up perspective if you are a beginner. Get a ton of ellipse templates, and buy or make ships curves ($$$$$$$$) to make your linework sharp and deliberate looking. NEVER, EVER use a dull pencil. It'll look like crap. I blow through electric pencil sharpeners like no one's business so get a good one, you won't regret it. Sometimes I only use a cheapo Bic or Pilot Razor Point II pen and get cool results. Get a gum eraser (pull it apart and shape it like clay) and Magic Rub white erasers.

Shading:
Chartpak AD markers are expensive but are the only real choice. Pantone makes cool ones that offer 3 tips but they are super expensive and don't fill or blend well. Prismacolor markers are total garbage. However, they have the best colored pencils and Pastels (for gradiations). Another good thing to have is Sharpie markers.

Highlights (AKA Pigeon Poop):
Get separate boxes of white Prismacolor colored pencils and use white gouache paint for intense light spots.

Best word of advice I can give: Buy "How to Draw Cars Like a Pro" by Thom Taylor. He goes over everything!

Don't be affraid to make messes. That's how you learn what works and what doesn't. Draw some black linework, make a million copies and practice 'til your arm pretty much falls off. Study other drawings in mags or on this forum and try to copy styles. Draw, Draw, Draw. It takes literally years. Be patient.

Good luck!
whats wrong with prisma markers? :eek:
 
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Boy...you guys got the tech stuff down huh?..coool.
There is no subsitute for parctice, and don't be afraid to throw s*&t away, you can always do it better again, once you get a clearer concept in your mind.

VISUALIZATION is the key. See it in your mind clearly, and work it on paper 'til you see it there too ! Whatever you use as media, THAT is the key to it ALL.

Just do not quit, no matter what at all...even snide comments !!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
well, I think I am getting ok with my line work, wtill think I need a little work, here's an example;



then here is a more detailed motorcycle I worked on



I see some really nice rendering on some boards done with sketchbook pro or something, and wonder if the only way to get to that type of look is through expensive software?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
aLID said:
whats wrong with prisma markers? :eek:
I hope nothingsince I have a few hundred dollars worth of them,

Got them when I was makin money......ahhh those were the days......
 

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Originally posted by aLid
whats wrong with prisma markers?
They absolutley SUCK! My college instructors told us to buy them at like $35 for a set of 10. They wear out as fast as those crappy kids markers you buy in Staples for $1.50 for 25. They don't blend well, they don't fill an area well and the tiny tip rarely gets ink in it. I bought them once, and bought Chartpaks after that.

The industrial design firm I work in now has an entire closet of Chartpaks since the others just never did the job. Although, we do all our linework in Alias and render concepts in Photoshop now. The car renderings I've done recently are mostly rendered in Photoshop now. It's cheaper, cleaner, you have an electronic file to email quickly and there's always the UNDO button!

Occasionally, I have a client that requests the old school, sketchy rendering and I really enjoy doing it, until I screw up and have to do the whole thing over again. I really love taking a violet blue prisma color pencil and doing loose sketches with some scraped pastels and gouache.

Try a bunch of stuff, and stick with whatever you feel comfortable with. Just have fun and make a mess!:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Dabanj6 said:
They absolutley SUCK! My college instructors told us to buy them at like $35 for a set of 10. They wear out as fast as those crappy kids markers you buy in Staples for $1.50 for 25. They don't blend well, they don't fill an area well and the tiny tip rarely gets ink in it. I bought them once, and bought Chartpaks after that.
anyone wanna buy a bunch of prismacolor markers??? :D
 
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Cdesign said:
well, I think I am getting ok with my line work, still think I need a little work, here's an example;



I see some really nice rendering on some boards done with sketchbook pro or something, and wonder if the only way to get to that type of look is through expensive software?
...the truck really works good, the moto...you tried to hard. You can do it without $$$software, just pick out the defining lines and leave out the sketchy ones (shading), you'll have a crisp line drawing for digital rendering then, and it will work (see that firebird drawing )...right ?

this drawing is "overworked" in shading, but if you place tracing paper over it
and "erase" all the crap, it will leave a line drawing that is useable for imaging.
... if if a drawing is not your best at first, if it "cops the feel" use it to work off of to geta better picture. (this drawing is a good example of what some of us have done to visualize a design at first, rough sketchy lines that work and work the paper until it almost rips !!!..lol.) that's what your moto did, slow it down clean it up, but don't worry we all do it...even if some of us refuse to admit it !!!!
I still use older drawings like this to get ideas from, I keep a book of them, good and bad (if it has a redeeming quality) this one had some elements I did want to use again, so I redid it in PS. You'll see later it worked too !....by cleaning up the shading (erase & whitecolor) you can eleiminate the "stuff" you do not need anymore...


....so you can use a crap drawing (if it has the right feel ) if you clean it up. Then it can be re-color shaded with digital paint & textures to bring back the intended surfaces and make it look realistic, ...hope all that helps you get a bit of a handle on how you could do your own thing too !...good luck & have fun !
 

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C-
The truck you did is a pretty good start. I like the variations in line weight to describe the body. I know what you were trying to do with the "missing tire" look, but they need more definition.

When sketching, start off extremely light and don't hold the tip of the pencil like you're doing detail work. What you want to do is be really loose, draw with quick light passes using your ENTIRE arm or at least up to the elbow. Don't worry if 2 intersecting lines extend beyond their intersection. It makes for cool effects sometimes.

Don't expect to be great or even good for quite a while. It's one of those things that just takes time. Once you figure out how to draw and marker render, then you can go on to something like photoshop. You have to know the basics first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Dabanj6 said:
C-
The truck you did is a pretty good start. I like the variations in line weight to describe the body. I know what you were trying to do with the "missing tire" look, but they need more definition.

When sketching, start off extremely light and don't hold the tip of the pencil like you're doing detail work. What you want to do is be really loose, draw with quick light passes using your ENTIRE arm or at least up to the elbow. Don't worry if 2 intersecting lines extend beyond their intersection. It makes for cool effects sometimes.

Don't expect to be great or even good for quite a while. It's one of those things that just takes time. Once you figure out how to draw and marker render, then you can go on to something like photoshop. You have to know the basics first.
yeah, I left the wheels & tires out and was planning to add them in photoshop, then I realized I suck at photoshop.

I can be fine with line drawing for now. I have a couple of decent renderings about here is an older one.....



I am getting ok at marker rendering I am just a little more concerned with Line work right now anyway.
 

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Dabanj6 said:
Torred is 100% correct about making sure the actual drawing is correct before messing with color. You've got to nail the perspective FIRST!

But to answer your question:

Linework:
I use 14x17 Beinfang Graphix 360 Marker paper (semi-translucent) for most of my renderings. Overlays are the secret to sharpening up perspective if you are a beginner. Get a ton of ellipse templates, and buy or make ships curves ($$$$$$$$) to make your linework sharp and deliberate looking. NEVER, EVER use a dull pencil. It'll look like crap. I blow through electric pencil sharpeners like no one's business so get a good one, you won't regret it. Sometimes I only use a cheapo Bic or Pilot Razor Point II pen and get cool results. Get a gum eraser (pull it apart and shape it like clay) and Magic Rub white erasers.

Shading:
Chartpak AD markers are expensive but are the only real choice. Pantone makes cool ones that offer 3 tips but they are super expensive and don't fill or blend well. Prismacolor markers are total garbage. However, they have the best colored pencils and Pastels (for gradiations). Another good thing to have is Sharpie markers.

Highlights (AKA Pigeon Poop):
Get separate boxes of white Prismacolor colored pencils and use white gouache paint for intense light spots.

Best word of advice I can give: Buy "How to Draw Cars Like a Pro" by Thom Taylor. He goes over everything!

Don't be affraid to make messes. That's how you learn what works and what doesn't. Draw some black linework, make a million copies and practice 'til your arm pretty much falls off. Study other drawings in mags or on this forum and try to copy styles. Draw, Draw, Draw. It takes literally years. Be patient.

Good luck!
Are you at a consultancy or in a corporation and is it all product design or something else?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Hudson said:
Just a question...but what's with the huge rear drive sprocket?

built into the outer rim, as is the disc for the brakes. Front drive gear is larger to adjust for it. Purely for design.
 
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