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So do we get a carwash with every laptop

New computer store first to feature Linux gear
Opening hailed as historic event


Windows rival grows in popularity


TYLER HAMILTON
TECHNOLOGY REPORTER

Toronto will become home this weekend to what's being touted as the first retail computer store devoted exclusively to Linux-based products.

Sub500.com, located at 2930 Dufferin St. near Lawrence Ave., will sell PCs and laptop computers based on the increasingly popular and relatively inexpensive open-source operating system, which has emerged as a serious alternative to Microsoft Corp.'s Windows.

Linux has already grabbed a significant share of the corporate server market and a growing number of Linux software providers, Red Hat, Mandrake, Xandros and Lindows among them, are beginning to promote the operating system for business and home use.

Marc and David Silverman, 32 and 37, respectively, have been selling Linux products over the Web for 18 months. The brothers also operate a car wash on Dufferin St. and figured they could use surplus office space at that location to open a Linux store.

Marc Silverman said many people are tired of having "Microsoft shoved down their throats" and a store dedicated to Linux gives the average computer user a chance to test computers and applications based on the operating system before making a purchase.

The store will have Linux experts to answer questions and a service centre that can handle repairs and upgrades.

The brothers will initially sell laptops and personal computers based on Lindow Inc.'s Linspire, a user-friendly Windows-like version of Linux.

PCs will cost from $299 to $979, while laptops will sell for as low as $1,111.

Linspire add-on software packages containing personal finance, word processing, spreadsheets and photo-editing applications, as well as games, will sell for less than $50.

Marc Silverman said Linspire offers "a good way for the average guy to get out of Windows," though the brothers plan to add other versions of Linux in the coming months.

"We're going to carry the whole line-up."

Michael Robinson, chief executive officer of Lindows, went so far as to call the upcoming opening of the new store a "historical event for the Linux industry." That's because most current Linux users must download and install the operating system and related applications themselves, as there are few retailers who sell and service pre-loaded Linux computers.

Marc Silverman said the store is an experimental "one-off" at the moment.

"But if things work well we would definitely expand."

Montreal would likely be the next target city, he added.
 

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Hot damn, its about time. I tried linux once but couldn't get it to run on the net to well...Hopefully this will be a WELCOME alternative to the crap Bill is giving us.
 

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Originally posted by Nocturn_Bird@Jul 5 2004, 11:03 PM
Hot damn, its about time. I tried linux once but couldn't get it to run on the net to well...Hopefully this will be a WELCOME alternative to the crap Bill is giving us.
I've been using nothing but Linux for the last 3 years or so. If you want a prebuilt system that can work for you, try getting one of Rex's machines. :)
 

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There are ways of running certain Windows applications through Linux, but to be honest, not really, and not easily.

However most Windows programs have a Linux equivalent. There is Star Office which is exactly like MS-Office, and has complete file compatibility. There are thousands of Linux applications, many of them are FREE.

As far as AutoCad, I'm not sure if there's a Linux program that is as powerful (there might be).


Our machines are totally Windows compatible. You could either erase Linux altogether and run Windows, or you could make the system dual-boot, so that you get the best of both systems.
 

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Originally posted by airbalancer@Jul 8 2004, 07:01 PM
Can you run window program on linux, eg autocadd,word
If you purchase Crossover Office, you can use MS Office applications, IE (I don't know why you would want too... :eek: ), and various other programs under linux. However, StarOffice ($70) or OpenOffice.org (free version of StarOffice) have 95% of the features of MS Office and both are compatible with MS Office files.

As far as AutoCAD, I don't know if it will work under WINE/Crossover Office. There is Linux equivilant, however that last time I saw info on it, it wasn't really ready. Unfortunately, I don't remember the name of it. If you use VMWare (or a similar product), it should work.
 

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I think you will find the Unix/Linux world is going windows (not Microsoft Windows) and they are facing the same hurdles as Microsoft. Also, Unix/Linux is less and LESS FREE.

Microsoft has made some tools to be interoperable with Unix/Linux yet Unix/Linux do very little to share that responsibility.

Just my 2 cents. ;)
 

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I don't think that it's a matter that Linux is or isn't free.
I think the important thing is to give an alternate CHOICE.
The fact that some versions are free or are significantly less expensive than Micro$oft, makes that an added bonus.
 

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Originally posted by actionjack@Jul 13 2004, 06:02 PM
I think you will find the Unix/Linux world is going windows (not Microsoft Windows) and they are facing the same hurdles as Microsoft.  Also, Unix/Linux is less and LESS FREE.

Microsoft has made some tools to be interoperable with Unix/Linux yet Unix/Linux do very little to share that responsibility.

Just my 2 cents. ;)
Unix is not free. Companies like IBM and Sun made their living by selling Unix.

The Linux kernel (the core of any OS) is free, so are many programs for it as well as the GUI (which is seperate then the kernel). Just because a company like SUSE or RedHat sells Linux, doesn't mean it's not free. You can easily download the kernel and all supporting programs for free and install it yourself. SUSE, RedHat and other companies do all of this for you. They're charging for their expertise in this area. Also, they make their most money off of support, not selling products. Another thing is most businesses don't want to use free products if they can't buy support contracts. They'll happily spend money to know that if there's a problem, they can get on the phone right away and talk to somebody immediately AND have a solution in a reasonable amount of time. Home users don't need these support contracts, nor do most of them need immediate help.

As far as interoperability, Linux has better interoperability with Windows then the other way around. Since when could you read/write a Linux partition from Windows (right out of the box)? Perhaps the Unix tools allow this, but I've never used them. You can do so from Linux. I've networked Linux and Windows machines using Microsofts' networking technology. Just install Samba on Linux, and configure the settings. I've just recently setup a Primary Domain Controler using Linux to act as the main server in a windows only network.

The only reason MS offers Unix tools is to try to help companies move away from Unix. Linux wasn't even in their radar when they did this. The original networking code for Windows was taken from BSD code (an all free version of Unix. The same code that now is the core of Apple's OS X).

Linux is about choice. Linux has had a GUI (a windowing enviroment) for quite some time now. Many corporations/governments are switching to Linux. Many companies are porting their products to Linux. Gaming companies are slowly deciding to make their games work on Linux as well. It won't all happen overnight, but it is happening.

Because we all have this choice with Linux, the users won't be as affected when there's an exploit flying around. Not everyone will be using the same web browser, or the same distro (SUSE, RedHat, Mandrake, etc), or the same email program. With Windows, everyone has IE and Outlook/Outlook Express. Everyone is affected by the same exploits. The diversity/choice of Linux makes it so that if there is an exploit, only a small portion of users will be infected/affected, which will make the total damage much smaller.

I just realized that I'm rambling, so I'll shut up now.
 

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'Skie' I am not real expert with the Linux/Unix but I have seen where the Microsoft 2000 in conjunction with Sun systems with Active Directory fails to bring all the tools available from Microsoft for various reasons and many times having to do with security since Active Directory is built on LDAP.

Microsoft has also created tools to help synch these systems which would only help to make a more diverse network. Linux/Unix as far as I know have not taken any of those steps. But maybe you know?
 

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Samba 3.0 has working support for Active Directory. I'm not familiar with Sun systems so I can't comment on that, nor am I familiar with the Unix tools from MS. The Windows SMB protocol (what drives the Windows networking and is underneath Active Directory) isn't very secure. I'm by no means an expert either. One of the biggest roadblocks in Linux offering supporting services is that MS will not release any specs or code or what have you. This forces the Linux guys to reverse engineer everything. Samba is alive because several people took the time to reverse engineer SMB. Active Directory support wasn't available until late last year (or was it early this year?). Because MS isn't willing to help, certain support will take longer to implement then if MS was willing to help.

I just realized we're really getting off topic here. If you want to continue this, go ahead and start a thread in the Lounge and I'll be more then happy to discuss this stuff with you. :)
 
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