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Discussion Starter · #101 ·
Just to add...that is exactly NOT the way I believe Ford would position a modern "SVO".
 

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I don't know that I think the 4 cylinder era was any darker than the modern six cylinder era prior to the 3.7L. I think a turbo four would easily have as much credibility as the V-6 does at a minimum and likely more so long as performance is decent. If Ford was going to try and make a V-6 work in the Mustang then I think co-opting the SHO moniker for that purpose made sense, at least in a 'performance package' variant.
 

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A modern day SVO should use the 3.5L EcoBoost. The 240 hp 2.0L Ecoboost would be adequate for the base Mustang, although even a 2.5L NA would be fine for Mustangs for the secretary type.
 

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Anybody know the price to buy a turbo 2.0 4, an ecoboost v6 and the 420 hp v8?

I bet the cost is very close so I'd be hoping for a v8 powered gt.....

The turbo stuffs cool but I really prefer v8 packaging and power...

Keep us updated on further news on this stunning new Evos based product with IRS ...

I would be curious of the cost of crate versions of these three power plants....

300 hp turbo 4 (maybe)
365 hp to maybe 420 hp turbo v6
420 to 475 hp v8......

May?3 well get lucky and see a dual clutch automatic manual thing a mig
 

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Strictly from an engine development and production perspective the turbo four and V8 are probably a wash, the turbo six is definitely more a more expensive proposition. Looking at the total package, a turbo four pony is likely cheaper to build than the V8 because of other areas where a V8 would require an upgrade that the four won't, the turbo six is probably the most expensive of them all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #106 ·
Strictly from an engine development and production perspective the turbo four and V8 are probably a wash, the turbo six is definitely more a more expensive proposition. Looking at the total package, a turbo four pony is likely cheaper to build than the V8 because of other areas where a V8 would require an upgrade that the four won't, the turbo six is probably the most expensive of them all.
I agree with that. The ancillary component costs of a V8 add to the package price more than the actual engines.
 

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The fatal flaw with the SVO was, that although it handled great, looked great, and provided acceptable power, it was tough to accept it's substantial additional cost over a GT or LX, and not get a five point oh.
The 5.0 flat out destroyed the SVO in straight line acceleration, which is what most Mustang buyers at the time cared about.

In the early nineties, the big thing was swapping 5.0s into 'sploded SVOs. Made a nice package. Ford should have done that and left the twiddly-bit hair-dryered Lima for the Merkurs.
 

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More info (rumors)
Last week we reported that Ford might be dropping the Shelby GT500 in favor of the SVT Cobra for the next generation Mustang, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that the Shelby name will be disappearing from the Ford lineup. According to our sources inside Ford, the company will introduce a Shelby GT350 model for 2016, a year after the next generation Mustang is launched for 2015. The big news is that the car will be an official Ford factory model, similar to the current Shelby GT500, and unlike the current GT350 model that is only a post-title package available directly from Shelby. Details about the 2016 Shelby GT350 are understandably scarce at the moment, but we hear it will be more of a stripped-down performance car just like in 1965, and expect it to be more affordable than the current model, which starts at just over $58,000.
More info at Mustangsdaily
 

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Discussion Starter · #109 ·
More info (rumors)
Last week we reported that Ford might be dropping the Shelby GT500 in favor of the SVT Cobra for the next generation Mustang, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that the Shelby name will be disappearing from the Ford lineup. According to our sources inside Ford, the company will introduce a Shelby GT350 model for 2016, a year after the next generation Mustang is launched for 2015. The big news is that the car will be an official Ford factory model, similar to the current Shelby GT500, and unlike the current GT350 model that is only a post-title package available directly from Shelby. Details about the 2016 Shelby GT350 are understandably scarce at the moment, but we hear it will be more of a stripped-down performance car just like in 1965, and expect it to be more affordable than the current model, which starts at just over $58,000.
More info at Mustangsdaily
Maybe the GT350 will be Ford's answer to the Z/28 - at least spiritually.
 

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Discussion Starter · #110 ·
The 5.0 flat out destroyed the SVO in straight line acceleration, which is what most Mustang buyers at the time cared about.

In the early nineties, the big thing was swapping 5.0s into 'sploded SVOs. Made a nice package. Ford should have done that and left the twiddly-bit hair-dryered Lima for the Merkurs.
The SVO's looks, better handling and fancier trimmed interior with a 5.0 would have made for one badass Mustang. Of course, the SVO's hood would have to been made to work with the 5.0. :D
 

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After doing some calculations, they should be able to produce a streetable 550 horsepower at about 7500 RPM with a high compression DI 5.2L Coyote, and with Ford's cam-torque-actuated (CTA) Twin Independent-Variable Cam Timing (Ti-VCT) still manage to get decent fuel economy at normal engine speeds. It takes about 7000 RPM to produce 100 hp/L using today's "readily available" engine technology. Ferrari manages to do this with only 6000 RPM, which is quite phenomenal engineering for a street motor. Nevertheless, matching the gearing provided by the M-82 in the Boss/GT with such an engine, fuel economy should be fairly decent for a specialty vehicle--no worse than the current GT500 for sure. A 5.2L would also have a square bore (rod-to-stroke ratio) with a 92.7mm stroke, which yields similar piston speeds @ 8400 RPM to those of the 106mm stroked 5.8L at 7100 RPM. Therefore, this would be an ideal road race/street motor that would be less expensive in the long run than the cost of a blower motor with less warranty liability. As much as I would like to see a NA 5.8L Boss, I do believe this will be the option Ford uses in the next SVT car. This would give Ford bragging rights and serious street cred not only in the U.S. but also worldwide. :clap:
If they can make a 5.2 with that kind of output I'd be suprised. There's less to go wrong with an NA engine so development costs won't be too bad.


Anybody know the price to buy a turbo 2.0 4, an ecoboost v6 and the 420 hp v8?
The 5.0 crate retails for $9k. The ecoboost V6 is more, but I'm pretty sure thats the "idiot" price (the price the dealer charges you if you blow your motor) .
 

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If they can make a 5.2 with that kind of output I'd be suprised. There's less to go wrong with an NA engine so development costs won't be too bad.
I would be too - not because I don't think Ford has the intellectual property to do it, but because they probably don't see the business case. I disagree with this premise and hope their marketing department will push the bean counters in that direction and challenge their engineers. I think a high RPM, high output, naturally aspirated, small displacement motor using "some" of today's best technology would be far more desirable than the mundane supercharged motors Ford has relied on over the past decade. It's time for Ford to really push the engineering envelope going global (look how well received the Boss editions were). Power adders are power cheaters in the minds of most enthusiasts abroad and besides, it would be a more track friendly, durable engine. I think you can agree with me on this.

Look at BMW for example; as you know, they've had a 4.0L (S65) producing upwards of 104 hp/L on the market since before 2007 (sans DI). Incorporate DI and we are looking at a specific output of more than 107 hp/L, which would give a 5.2L Coyote 555 hp. Not too shabby! I believe Ford could do this in the new Cobra...or at least come very close.
 

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I would be too - not because I don't think Ford has the intellectual property to do it, but because they probably don't see the business case. I disagree with this premise and hope their marketing department will push the bean counters in that direction and challenge their engineers. I think a high RPM, high output, naturally aspirated, small displacement motor using "some" of today's best technology would be far more desirable than the mundane supercharged motors Ford has relied on over the past decade. It's time for Ford to really push the engineering envelope going global (look how well received the Boss editions were). Power adders are power cheaters in the minds of most enthusiasts abroad and besides, it would be a more track friendly, durable engine. I think you can agree with me on this.

Look at BMW for example; as you know, they've had a 4.0L (S65) producing upwards of 104 hp/L on the market since before 2007 (sans DI). Incorporate DI and we are looking at a specific output of more than 107 hp/L, which would give a 5.2L Coyote 555 hp. Not too shabby! I believe Ford could do this in the new Cobra...or at least come very close.
Over 100 hp/l, high rpm, high durability etc and all that in N.A form. I would like to see that coming from Ford.
 

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I would be too - not because I don't think Ford has the intellectual property to do it, but because they probably don't see the business case. I disagree with this premise and hope their marketing department will push the bean counters in that direction and challenge their engineers. I think a high RPM, high output, naturally aspirated, small displacement motor using "some" of today's best technology would be far more desirable than the mundane supercharged motors Ford has relied on over the past decade. It's time for Ford to really push the engineering envelope going global (look how well received the Boss editions were). Power adders are power cheaters in the minds of most enthusiasts abroad and besides, it would be a more track friendly, durable engine. I think you can agree with me on this.

Look at BMW for example; as you know, they've had a 4.0L (S65) producing upwards of 104 hp/L on the market since before 2007 (sans DI). Incorporate DI and we are looking at a specific output of more than 107 hp/L, which would give a 5.2L Coyote 555 hp. Not too shabby! I believe Ford could do this in the new Cobra...or at least come very close.
the GT350 does indeed have a 5.2 ("voodoo"), and it will have over 500hp.
revs/power were brought down to sustain longevity so yeh they can make heaps of power.

GT will have less than 450hp.
 

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the GT350 does indeed have a 5.2 ("voodoo"), and it will have over 500hp.
revs/power were brought down to sustain longevity so yeh they can make heaps of power.

GT will have less than 450hp.
Well, I don't know where you got your info from but it sounds reasonable. I've seen speculations/claims as high as 475 hp for the new GT but bet it will have closer to 450, as we know the next Camaro V8 will have at least that. And I'm sure Ford doesn't want to take a back seat again to Chevy. They could easily produce 450 hp by just incorporating the Boss 302 enhancements onto the standard Coyote with a slightly leaner tune and then reliability/longevity would be intact - all this without DI and still get the mileage they need in a car that is at least 200 lb lighter. Why use the added expense and problematic issues that go along with DI if unnecessary? So, this very well might be the direction they go....


As far as the upcoming specialty Mustang, who knows? The 5.2 is a claim by those who've had credible predictions in the past (TTAC) and confirmed by long standing credible members in forums who have family/close friends working at Ford. It also makes more sense than going with the 5.8 in NA form as the piston speeds are just too high. I do expect them to produce at least 100 hp/L for marketing reasons and I know it is feasible for them to do it; it's just a matter of how much liability Ford wants to accept with a higher RPM motor. I bet 525 will be the number. Seems reasonable. All one has to do is look closely at what BMW has accomplished with the S65B44 to see where they could go without DI and that would lead us to 525 hp. :yup:
 

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I submit to you that there are a whole slew of consumers who are not interested in that capability nor happily willing to pay for it.
Again, I agree 100%! These cars are not Corvettes and Vipers, they and not solely performance cars. There is, and needs to be, a much broader market for them to succeed, and not all of that market want their head pinned to the head rest off the line!
 

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I have no idea what the final hp numbers will be ......yet I'm sure the v8 gt will kick some serious @ss!

I am hopeful it carries a good portion of the Evos based showcar we ve seen....now that's what's important...

The current mustangs cool looking yet its been around in various forms for too long to fully captivate many buyers...

I believe neck snapping acceleration, great handling and braking will be part of the performance package...


Secretary versions of this mustang are what creates the volume to keep the high performance versions value priced...

Hopefully the SVO turbo 4 or turbo v6 will be cool too.....

Still rather have a v8 though...

Getting closer to the time for release and its exciting
 

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Well, I don't know where you got your info from but it sounds reasonable. I've seen speculations/claims as high as 475 hp for the new GT but bet it will have closer to 450, as we know the next Camaro V8 will have at least that. And I'm sure Ford doesn't want to take a back seat again to Chevy. They could easily produce 450 hp by just incorporating the Boss 302 enhancements onto the standard Coyote with a slightly leaner tune and then reliability/longevity would be intact - all this without DI and still get the mileage they need in a car that is at least 200 lb lighter. Why use the added expense and problematic issues that go along with DI if unnecessary? So, this very well might be the direction they go....


As far as the upcoming specialty Mustang, who knows? The 5.2 is a claim by those who've had credible predictions in the past (TTAC) and confirmed by long standing credible members in forums who have family/close friends working at Ford. It also makes more sense than going with the 5.8 in NA form as the piston speeds are just too high. I do expect them to produce at least 100 hp/L for marketing reasons and I know it is feasible for them to do it; it's just a matter of how much liability Ford wants to accept with a higher RPM motor. I bet 525 will be the number. Seems reasonable. All one has to do is look closely at what BMW has accomplished with the S65B44 to see where they could go without DI and that would lead us to 525 hp. :yup:
info is from those working on them, they're only looking at mild changes at the moment. not sure if they need to match lt1's power if s550 will be much lighter.
 

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Any word on whether any V-6 Ecoboost engines will find themselves under the hood of the next-generation Mustang? While you can't make them sound like a V-8, the low- and mid-RPM punch they provide is definitely muscle car-worthy, in my opinion.
 
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