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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

Does a snow plowing vehicle really need low range? Is it preferred? I've noticed a few vehicles other than 3/4 ton pickups with plows including a late '90s Ford Explorer w/ the 302 and AWD along with a late model Chevy Express van with RWD. Both were lighter duty plows, however.
 

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4 lo is preferred id assume (for those just in case scenarios)- more torque, gearing is different, best for slow speed crawling. depending how much you actually plow though, i dont think its exactly necessary though.

usually you only use 4lo is you desperately need it- ive never needed it.
 

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It depends, I plow in 4hi most of the time. Parking lots, driveways etc. Less torque is better in most cases, it makes the tires not break loose as easily.

I use 4lo on cabin roads or on the ice under heavy loads to keep the tranny cooler.
 

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It depends, I plow in 4hi most of the time. Parking lots, driveways etc. Less torque is better in most cases, it makes the tires not break loose as easily.

I use 4lo on cabin roads or on the ice under heavy loads to keepp the tranny cooler.

Same here...

I've even used 2WD on light stuff...
 

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Not absolutely needed, but useful.

In 4hi, I find that I often ram into the hardened snowpile a bit hard in first gear... (not good for the truck). 4lo is just perfect.

How a RWD Chevy Express van can plow is completely beyond me though. Maybe the guy has a land that goes downhill and plows his driveway from the top down? That's the only scenario I can see where it would work :D

PS -- doh: I've fixed both my doors now (after welding that framerail patch I told you about in the other thread) and they open/close fine... I've rammed hard snowpiles several times and the frame/cab haven't shown any trace of permanent flexing/moving/tearing so far.
 

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PS -- doh: I've fixed both my doors now (after welding that framerail patch I told you about in the other thread) and they open/close fine... I've rammed hard snowpiles several times and the frame/cab haven't shown any trace of permanent flexing/moving/tearing so far.
Cool, a tech I work with now, who does some comercial plowing like me. Drove over the front clip of his Ford after the frame broke.

Glad to hear you got it fixed, I have never cracked a frame plowing with a Chebby, but I have taken out a tranny, and spit alot of the tranny fluid out of the dip stick tube, smelling burnt.

My current truck has the most miles of any I have plowed with 215k kms, so I am being extra careful.

P.S. Usually in the hard going, if you get stuck in 4lo, you can get out by switching to 4hi and easing the throttle so the tires don't spin
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
ugh my bad! The Express van was All Wheel Drive, not RWD:eek:

But thanks, now I know. I might have to make another thread but is it bad to have dual rear wheels on a plow truck?
 

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ugh my bad! The Express van was All Wheel Drive, not RWD:eek:

But thanks, now I know. I might have to make another thread but is it bad to have dual rear wheels on a plow truck?
Dual rear wheel pick up or cab and chassis? With a pick up you have to rember those breakable fenders behind you when plowing up against something, even the snow bank.

Are you going to run a sander in the back? The extra capacity axle would help

You will need atleast a 9' plow on a dually for the windrow to pass the rear tires.
 
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