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With diesel being a bit to a lot more expensive than gas in the US, how affordable or feasible would it be to drive a diesel vehicle as your daily commute compared to gas? Is it worth it?
 

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I think you would still have an advantage over gasoline, but it would be a much smaller one that it used to be when diesel was less expensive than gasoline, like it should be and like it is in every other part of the world. All you need to find out is how much more fuel efficient diesel is in an average percentage and how much more expensive it tends to be. I dont' know either of those figures right now.
 

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Part of the problem is that most of the oil refineries are tooled to be more efficient and output more regular gas thean gasoline, unlike in other areas. If new refineries (if those are ever made to be overall just more efficient) are tooled to output more desiel the price will go down. Also one of the problems with desiels is still the perception that the are smelly, noisy and pollute a lot more than gas, which on the whole is not true.

If the Astra was sold over here with a desiel, lets just say thats what I would be driving. If the next gen comes over with one I would be very tempted to switch over to that.
 

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Also one of the problems with desiels is still the perception that the are smelly, noisy and pollute a lot more than gas, which on the whole is not true.
True, they're no longer noisy or smelly, but with the new emissions laws that made them such, they're even more expensive initially. Add the higher fuel price and it would be tough to ever break even. I'm also afraid producing more diesel from an apparently finite amount of oil would only raise prices of both gasoline and diesel.
 

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Keep in mind too that the diesel engine option on any vehicle is quite expensive
 

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Wait for biodiesel to be made in significant quantities. That should cause the price of diesel to drop.
I hope you're right, but suspect otherwise. Ethanol hasn't made much of a positive impact on the gasoline market, but done right, maybe biodiesel will do better. Time will tell.
 

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You have opened up a Pandora's Box, with that question about diesel. A week ago I spoke to a long term friend that was a supervisor in the Oil Business, and I asked him why diesel was so expensive. I will preface the question with a statement, he is currently attempting to obtain his Commercial Pilot's license.

His answer to me was: "It doesn't make sense at all. Diesel is the first and most plentiful product to come from crude refining. There's no reason it isn't selling for .25 a gallon, except the greed of speculating companies." He further stated to me diesel is not in short supply, that was why diesel was selected at the very beginning for strategic/commercial fuel.

To the topic: If diesel were reasonably priced, and readily available, I would own a diesel automobile. Historically diesel vehicles last longer 300k is not unusual. They offer greater economy, and generate very high torque. These are all win, wins to my thinking.

What do you think?
 

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It depends, will the environmental nazis continue to insist on impossibly clean diesel fuels and next to zero emissions?

Too many restraints on the technology right now.
 

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Everyone on this site realizes the driving benefits that diesels have but the price of diesel is what will determine if it becomes more or less feasible. There are actually many reasons why diesel is much more expensive than regular fuel in the U.S. and those reasons point to the fact that the gap will only widen in the future over the course of a typical year.
 

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The solution is obvious - slightly lessen the emissions requirements, and do not allow California and other states to set their own emissions limits. New vehicles are not the problems. If the government really wants to cut emissions, they have to address all of the clunkers operated by the "poor."
 
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It is, but one of the major reasons why more is not refined in the US is structural.

And one of the major reasons why diesel is used more in Europe is because public policy in Europe dictates so.

Diesel could be used more in the US, but I think US public policy will need to guide it, that is unless the "market" (auto companies/refiners) work together to drive it that way.
 

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I have a friend that works at a refinery...he tells me it is a lot cheaper to make diesel than it is to make gas...the company can charge more for it though because the country runs on it. Diesel electric locomotives, semis, farm equipment, etc.
I drive a 2006 diesel jetta and my average (60% highway, 40% city driving) is 46-47 mpg. I drive an hour, just over 50 miles, one way to work a day.
By purchasing my jetta and not driving my sonoma on a daily basis anymore, i'm saving over $120 a week in fuel. Not saying I couldn't save money by buying an XFE cobalt, but im very satisfied with my car and just wish that the oil companies would stop sticking it to everyone.
 

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Everyone on this site realizes the driving benefits that diesels have but the price of diesel is what will determine if it becomes more or less feasible. There are actually many reasons why diesel is much more expensive than regular fuel in the U.S. and those reasons point to the fact that the gap will only widen in the future over the course of a typical year.
One of the main reasons for higher diesel prices in the US ... it can be EXPORTED for MUCH HIGHER PROFIT to the Euro and Asian markets.

IF gasoline demand were reduced about 30%, then some US refining capacity could be converted to the "cracking" process to double diesel and JP-8 yields (from roughly 20% up to 40/50%) at the expense of gasoline yield (currently roughly 50%)!

This could narrow the domestic price spread between diesel and gasoline. However, the influence of radically higher prices for diesel in foreign markets may not be completely eliminated ... at least ... not before WE achieve petroleum self-sufficiency and become a "net exporter".

Now, let's consider

Astra, MY2008 5 Door Hatchback 1.7CDTi 16v 100PS 5 Door Hatchback with 15" wheel: 36.7/44.1; 47/56.5; 56/67.3 mpg(US/Imperial) city; average; highway.
http://www.vcacarfueldata.org.uk/search/vehicleDetails.asp?id=20267

Saturn Astra 4DR Hatchback 4 cyl, 1.8 L, Manual 5-spd, gasoline: 24; 27: 32 mpg(US) city; average; highway.
http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/2008car1tablef.jsp?id=25169

The difference in rate of fuel consumption of almost 2 gallons per 100 miles advantage for the diesel Astra versus its' gasoline counterpart is significant economically, environmentally, for oil imports, AND ... more importantly ... NATIONAL SECURITY!

Also, when considered against the typical D3 offerings, the savings approach (possibly exceed) 3 gallons per 100 miles.

I'll let you figure out your personal "pay backs". But, keep in mind that a notably smaller displacement turbo diesel with lower fuel consumption rate is usually required to match the torque of a given gasoline engine.

Just my observations and opinion ...

*** SAVE the US ... ONE GALLON ... at a TIME! ***​
 

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Remember about a year ago diesel raised above gasoline because the sulfer content was lowered by federal mandate so additional refining was needed. But that still shouldn't be a reason that it is above $2.50 a gallon.

That said, even with it a little more then gas is now, I would have bought a diesel truck or car were it available in the choices that I own now, $2500 more or not.
 

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Remember about a year ago diesel raised above gasoline because the sulfer content was lowered by federal mandate so additional refining was needed. But that still shouldn't be a reason that it is above $2.50 a gallon.

That said, even with it a little more then gas is now, I would have bought a diesel truck or car were it available in the choices that I own now, $2500 more or not.
IMO there was a major refinining cost increase for diesel to go to ULSD (50 ppm S max) when it was more like 1000 ppm

Allowing more sulfur is not an option. The automakers must meet certain emissions standards and this must be on the availible fuel, and to put high-sulfer fuel in a car designed for the low sulfur will cause significant damage to the car, a false economy.



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From one of the blogs that I read it won't be too long before coal will be converted to fuel to be used in a diesel vehicle. We have lots of coal and that should drop the price of fuel for diesel engines and cut the demand for oil too. This same blog says that the future is in diesel engines. Is it true? Only time will tell I suppose.
 
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When I read your headline, I thought you were referring to diesel in the US as a whole.

I do believe diesel can be utilized more here in the US. But like the oil execs said during the hearing before Congress, it may take public policy changes to make this happen. One Congressman asked why diesel is used more in Europe, the oil execs replied it is because of public policy in Europe.

I would honestly love to see a diesel option for the Malibu, Acadia, Enclave and Outlook, to name a few.
 
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