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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Indiana Municipality Approves Plans for Cutting-Edge Cellulosic Ethanol Production Plant
Merrillville, Ind. – Indiana Ethanol Power LLC (IEP) will begin contract negotiations with the Lake County Solid Waste Management District (LCSWMD) to build the first facility in the United States to convert commercial municipal solid waste to ethanol using the patented GeneSyst process.
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The 1,500 ton per day facility, utilizing the GeneSyst process invented by James Titmas, is expected to produce 20 million gallons of fuel-grade ethanol and other products each year.

John Clark, Director, Indiana Office of Energy & Defense Development, added, “This type of cutting-edge technology will be the first of its kind in the United States, making Lake County a leader in waste management technology.”

Lake County Second District Commissioner Gerry J. Scheub said at a recent board meeting, “This project is especially exciting to us because it is a fully funded private investment, provides high-paying jobs for the local economy, and has a direct positive and profound impact on our environment.”

IEP will work closely with local communities and environmental interest groups to select the facility site within Lake County. Approximately 120 to 130 employees will be hired to operate the facility.

Construction could begin in 2008 and should be completed within two years. “Pre-construction activities are moving forward for the first phase of the $100 million project,” Zig Resiak of IEP says. “We are firmly committed to utilizing the local workforce in building the state-of-the art-facility in Lake County.”
 

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Sounds great. Turning waste into fuel is the best way to make power if you ask me.
I could not agree more. Even switchgrass and jatropha need irrigation, and the world is running out of water as fast if not faster than it is running out of potable water.
 

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I could not agree more. Even switchgrass and jatropha need irrigation, and the world is running out of water as fast if not faster than it is running out of potable water.
Eventually we'll reach the point where lots of energy is needed to extract usable water from the ocean. Obviously, something that's not water intensive will be needed for that.
 

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Are you sure about that?

Yes, botanist and gardener here....switchgrass needs 2-3 FEET of water per acre per growing season for ample production, and jatropha growers have learned quickly that the no-irrigation angle was often hyped....many species want a great deal of water to grow at anything other than a snail's pace though they can TOLERATE extreme drought very well. But they need to thrive and grow quickly to be a viable source of fuel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yes, botanist and gardener here....switchgrass needs 2-3 FEET of water per acre per growing season for ample production,
Jackson, Mississippi:


The entire Northwest coast easily will get that much water in a season. Everywhere from Brownsville, Texas, to Memphis to the Carolina coasts will get that much in a season. Most of Florida will, and southern Kentucky will.
 

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Great to hear!!! and in my old stomping grounds too...was just in that area this weekend, driving to Michigan City and New Buffalo...all the people jammed into the casinos had me thinking what recession? j/k
 

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Jackson, Mississippi:


The entire Northwest coast easily will get that much water in a season. Everywhere from Brownsville, Texas, to Memphis to the Carolina coasts will get that much in a season. Most of Florida will, and southern Kentucky will.
Florida and much of the SE is in year 3 of severe drought, so in areas like that irrigation would be needed. I grow switchgrass in a pot for a year now and am amazed as its thirst, generally needing to keep standing water in the drainage tray. But as long as the Pacific NW stays good and wet, plus other regions, I bet it would do well. Sites promoting the crop emphasize the need for irrigation if rainfall below those levels. Makes more sense to me to use water for food crops and plant waste for cellulosic ethanol and the nation's aquifers in general are in duress, something I learned first hand (vs. a color chart) my 15 years in Colorado. Here in Florida, Lake Okeechobee has hit record lows and sadly, salt water intrusion into wells is getting common, even in some ways from the coast. With passionate gardening friends around the US I gather that drought is almost becoming a "norm" in so many areas that were once lush, like Tennessee and Virginia.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Florida and much of the SE is in year 3 of severe drought, so in areas like that irrigation would be needed. I grow switchgrass in a pot for a year now and am amazed as its thirst, generally needing to keep standing water in the drainage tray. But as long as the Pacific NW stays good and wet, plus other regions, I bet it would do well. Sites promoting the crop emphasize the need for irrigation if rainfall below those levels. Makes more sense to me to use water for food crops and plant waste for cellulosic ethanol and the nation's aquifers in general are in duress, something I learned first hand (vs. a color chart) my 15 years in Colorado. Here in Florida, Lake Okeechobee has hit record lows and sadly, salt water intrusion into wells is getting common, even in some ways from the coast. With passionate gardening friends around the US I gather that drought is almost becoming a "norm" in so many areas that were once lush, like Tennessee and Virginia.
I certainly agree with you that it would be idiotic to become dependent on a plant that requires intensive irrigation. But, of course, the great thing about cellulosic ethanol is that bacteria and enzymes can be specialized to meet the requirements of local sources of biomass. Switchgrass will work in the Northwest and deep South. In Indiana, they are building a facility to use municipal waste. Coskata is using wood waste in Pensylvania. There is not -- and does not need to be -- a single answer.

Also, biodiesel from algae is particularly attractive because algae can live on salt water.
 
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