GM Inside News Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Korean automaker Hyundai Motor America, which struggled with its quality reputation only a few years ago, has leapfrogged Detroit's automakers and is now ranked just below perennial leader Toyota in a closely watched survey of new-vehicle quality.

Hyundai tiedHonda Motor Co. for second place, and it surpassed European rivals in the J.D. Power and Associates Initial Quality Survey,released Wednesday.

Toyota Motor Sales, which includes the top-rated Lexus brand took first place in the company-wide initial quality. However, the Hyundai brand outperformed the Toyota brand. Detroit's automakers, though improved from last year, all ranked below the industry average.

J.D. Power surveyed more than 51,000 people three months after they bought or leased a new vehicle, asking about more than 100 potential problems.

Hyundai, which used to rank near the bottom of the study, made a vast improvement from a year ago, going from 143 problems reported per 100 vehicles to 102. The company attributes the improvement to a years-long commitment to advancing its quality.

In the 1999 model year, the company began putting a 10-year, 100,000-mile warranty on its vehicles as an assurance that it had changed.

Toyota had 101 reported problems, compared to 115 in 2003.

Hyundai said it knew it had made dramatic quality strides in recent years, but it had no idea that it had come this far.

"We are all over the moon with happiness," said Chris Hosford, a spokesman for Hyundai. "We knew this was coming," but "very few of us knew that we would make this big of an improvement."

Hyundai soured Americans during the 1980s largely because of its poor-quality cars. But the warranty, along with better styling, has helped the automaker gain market share.

"They're doing a better job of understanding the U.S. consumer," said Brian Walters, J.D. Power's senior director of vehicle research. They know "what they like and what they don't like."

General Motors Corp., the highest-ranked domestic automaker, improved its quality score by 10 percent to 120 complaints per 100 vehicles. But it still came in just behind the industry average of 119 problems.

Gary Cowger, president of GM North America, said the automaker performed well given that it launched 13 new products last year.

Full Story HERE
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,258 Posts
Er... I would personally have to disagree with this from the experience I've had with Hyundai vehicles. The build quality is not even close to that of anything GM or Ford currently puts out. I know these figures don't lie, but I find this hard to believe. I don't think long-term quality stands up, though. When a vehicle can last for 5-10 years and not develop any bizzare squeeks or rattles, then build quality is acceptable. When it can also not have any major mechanical or electrical failures in that time, that's also acceptable. When it can do that after 15 years of hard service, then we'll talk about quality. Most vehicles built today would probably do well after 4-5 years, but beyond that, problems are likely to creep up. We just don't know yet how the new crop of higher-quality GM, Ford, or even Hyundai vehicles will do in the long run.

As an example, my 1989 Audi 100 has no squeeks or rattles and runs as strong as new despite being nearly 16 years old and having over 181,000 miles on it. In fact I just took it on a trip to Canada, driving a thousand miles each way. The car performed beautifully for the trip, and my only complaint was that my cruise control isn't hooked up correctly (something I've just not had the time or money to fix), so I had a tendency to speed on the highway quite a bit, often doing 90-100mph sprints. Heck, I even spent an hour doing 100mph on NB-15 (nearly double the posted limit), as it's one of the most boring and desolate stretches of road there is, and although my fuel economy plummeted to 16mpg because of that, the car was just happy as can be at that speed. On average though, doing 80mph, I got just under 27mpg.

Now, how many cars built today will be able to perform so beautifully after 15 years of hard driving and 180,000 miles? Hyundai may have a 10/100 warranty, but most owners don't keep their cars that long, and the warranty is non-transferable. I'd trust a new Explorer or Blazer to give me 10 years or 100,000 miles of solid service more than I'd trust a Hyundai.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,621 Posts
Originally posted by awalbert88@Apr 30 2004, 05:22 AM
I'd trust a new Explorer or Blazer to give me 10 years or 100,000 miles of solid service more than I'd trust a Hyundai.
i feel this kinda thinking is similar to those import fans that have decided domestic cars are garbage no matter what the scores show. your experience points to a quality audi, not a poor quality hyundai. a well-built new car has better odds at becoming a rattle-free used car. if one doesn't put any stock in JD power rankings then fine, but then they can't take any consolation from GM's improved scores.

i don't particularly like hyundai, but i'm impressed by it. my sis is going to buy a new hyundai very soon... and i'm confident encouraging her. any research we've done has shown that, while they depreciate quickly, they're undervalued for the most part and remain trouble-free for a long time. the pony is long gone!

also, i've not know many cavalier owners who didn't have a fair bit of trouble between the end of their 3/60 warranty and where a 10/100 (aka hyundai) warranty would end.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,714 Posts
Just so you know...this survey was the IQS....Initial Quality Survey. This study only measures owners experiences in the first 90 days of ownership.

From my experience with Hyundais recently (and I have driven all of the current models), they are every bit as competitive as the domestics...in initial quality. I'm not defending long-term quality because most of the cars I drive have less than 10,000 miles on them. But out-of-the-box, Hyundai products are excellent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,085 Posts
Don't forget the 10/100 Hyundai warranty is POWERTRAIN, not the car as a whole. Lots of other stuff can go wrong. I'm not sure what the other warranties on the car Hyundai provides...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,258 Posts
Originally posted by paul8488@Apr 30 2004, 07:28 AM
i feel this kinda thinking is similar to those import fans that have decided domestic cars are garbage no matter what the scores show. your experience points to a quality audi, not a poor quality hyundai. a well-built new car has better odds at becoming a rattle-free used car. if one doesn't put any stock in JD power rankings then fine, but then they can't take any consolation from GM's improved scores.

i don't particularly like hyundai, but i'm impressed by it. my sis is going to buy a new hyundai very soon... and i'm confident encouraging her. any research we've done has shown that, while they depreciate quickly, they're undervalued for the most part and remain trouble-free for a long time. the pony is long gone!

also, i've not know many cavalier owners who didn't have a fair bit of trouble between the end of their 3/60 warranty and where a 10/100 (aka hyundai) warranty would end.
My experience with even slightly used Hyundai's is that the build quality deteriorates. The one I drove (a Sonata) also felt like.. well, like I was totally disconnected from the road. A very unpleasant driving experience. IQS is important, sure, but it's not the end-all be-all of quality, either. My concern is long-term quality much more than initial quality, but I also care a lot about how the car feels to drive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,013 Posts
This is pretty amazing. Hyundai seems to be getting better every year! Plus, the new Sonata looks to be promising.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top