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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
GM 1996 Suburban - rotor separation into two pieces (hub and disc). How is it possible to detect let alone measure rotor corrosion in a composite where the hat joins the disc? Are there any accepted guidelines on detecting/measuring when replacing the pads?
 

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If it is in 2 pieces what are you measuring for?It now goes into the garbage can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If it is in 2 pieces what are you measuring for?It now goes into the garbage can.
Along with the rest of the car, the front of which is in pieces after the rotor split and caused me to rear-end a semi in Virginia. Maybe it's just idle curiousity or maybe it's because I was permanently disabled as a result of that crash.
 

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Along with the rest of the car, the front of which is in pieces after the rotor split and caused me to rear-end a semi in Virginia. Maybe it's just idle curiousity or maybe it's because I was permanently disabled as a result of that crash.
Ouch.

That is a freakish failure though... I'd think a flaw in the disc metallurgy itself... how did it break apart? (ie is it smooth and just a weld or is it a one piece cast piece that cracked?)

Anyway what I mean is it is basically impossible for the rotor to corrode to a point where the hat breaks off. This is THICK steel/cast-iron. Sure if you left the thing in the bottom of the ocean for 50 years...



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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ouch.

That is a freakish failure though... I'd think a flaw in the disc metallurgy itself... how did it break apart? (ie is it smooth and just a weld or is it a one piece cast piece that cracked?)

Anyway what I mean is it is basically impossible for the rotor to corrode to a point where the hat breaks off. This is THICK steel/cast-iron. Sure if you left the thing in the bottom of the ocean for 50 years...
Nope, GM factory rotors on the larger SUVs and K1500 trucks series (going back to 1988) were composites. 88-92 had a recall in the northeast because of the corrosion problem. Thin steel hat joined to a cast iron disc. You could spin the hub without moving the disc - total separation in the area where I guess you would call the heat dam. It happened when I was braking. I heard the ABS go off momentarily then nada. Sailed right into the back of the truck on the highway. No skid marks and no swerving. Just no brakes.
 
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