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Would you prefer Holden to break away from GM?

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Here are two questions.

Would you rather Holden break away and become independent of GM?

If you do, would you rather Holden do it sooner or later?
 

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Much as I would like to see Holden achieve on its pat malone, there is much to be gained from our current arrangement, not least of which is exports. At the moment (although we own a large portion of Daewoo), Holden is ostensibly the Commodore Company.

Perhaps with the launch of the new Daewoo range, we could cut and run, but their is much that would need to be done.

Should probably refine that to: GM offers more than the sum of its NA parts, though there isn't much within GMNA that I would particualrly want to import.:D
 

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Holden is the only part of the company still loves to build cars with power. The are the old Pontiac of the 60's, and for that I love them.
Couldn't have said it better myself......

What I like equally as much as the muscular Holdens is the WM Statesman and the vehicles spawned from it (China's Buick Park Avenue for example)......an iron fist in a velvet glove if ever I saw it (or would that be the HSV Senator?) ;)
 

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I say no.
A nice dream but Holden would just be gobbled up by someone else, it is very hard for a car company of the size of Holden to survive as an independant. I'd smell an asset strip coming up - proving ground in Victoria, engine plant in Victoria, 40+ % of Daewoo, Assembly plant in Thailand - then assemble Toyotas or Modern Gentlemen in South OZ.
No thanks.
 

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Holden is a subsidiary of General Motors, its sole intent and purpose is to make money for GM. Subaru, Suzuki or even Isuzu might have considered going "on their own". For Holden, the question is pretty pointless.
 

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No - it is not sustainable on it's own. While it pays it's way, it needs GM to bankroll developments such as the VE.
 

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No - it is not sustainable on it's own. While it pays it's way, it needs GM to bankroll developments such as the VE.
It wouldn't survive current pressures that are being experienced throughout the automotive industry world-wide.

However if you asked wheteher it should be more autonomous (or 'daring') within the GM global family, then I'd support that.

It has been able to design and build some great cars in it short history (60 years as a whole car manufacturer in Australia) and it has a world class product now (VE).

Mike
 

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Actually, the VE was borne out of closer integration of Holden into global GM - previously, Holden built fine automobiles with a shoestring budget, so they basically did a wonderful job of rehashing a mix of their own old components with some newer ones borrowed from sister GM divisions (and, to be fair, some new stuff). That said, an all-new car - and platform - of world-class specifications required significant investment from GM and inclusion of GM's global network to close the business case.
 

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Whilst I certainly agree with your assessment of the Zeta effort, I have recently wondered if it couldn't have had a few more niceties if GM had have gotten on board earlier. I'm sure that there was always a future NA model I tend to think that the G8 was a knee jerk reaction to driving the car. Had they (GMNA) been more convinced earlier, then perhaps some of the VEs weaknesses (for example NVH and 4 speed auto) could have been bought out through greater investment.
 
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