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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here’s Why Honda’s Ambitious EV Plans Could Be a Challenge
April 29, 2021
Jay Ramey

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  • Honda plans to field two large EVs for the 2024 model year, using GM’s Ultium powertrain.
  • The automaker plans for 40% of its North American offerings to be electric or hydrogen by 2030, with plans to field its own platforms after 2025.
  • Honda’s hydrogen plans hinge on the expansion of hydrogen infrastructure, and could become less appealing as EV adoption progresses.
Honda may have been a hybrid pioneer along with Toyota, fielding the slippery Insight hatch in 1999, but just like Toyota it has waited on the sidelines to jump into the EV game, only throwing its hat in the ring relatively recently. And it hasn't made plans to offer its first truly mass-market EV, on sale in Europe right now, in North America.

Honda did offer an EV in the US for a brief moment, but odds are you've never seen it on the street. Honda began selling the Clarity Electric in Oregon and California starting in 2017, but withdrew it after it was panned for an 89-mile range. The hydrogen fuel-cell version of the Clarity, meanwhile, has been offered in southern California, but is perhaps an even narrower and costlier experiment at a time when the Tesla Model 3 is recording tens of thousands of sales worldwide each month.

It's fair to say that Honda's zero-emissions offerings to date have fallen a little flat. And it's also worth noting that when it comes to hybrids, the Honda Insight wallowed in the Toyota model's shadow for much of existence. An awkward first-gen Insight outing was followed by a Prius-shaped second-gen model that left after a few years (2010-'14) of lackluster sales. The Insight only came back to the market relatively recently, in 2019, this time as a Civic-style sedan.

Honda may get points for being an early player in the hybrid game, but points don't guarantee future success in different endeavors.

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I saw this, I assume people will be interested to know Honda's long range EV plans as we've had many discussions regarding their use of GM's Ultium.
 

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I saw this, I assume people will be interested to know Honda's long range EV plans as we've had many discussions regarding their use of GM's Ultium.
Gotta wonder what the Honda faithful will think of them using GM components.
That maybe GM isn't so bad after all??
 

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I think so. Honda and General Motors have collaborated with each other for over 25 years.
Yeah, but usually it was the Honda engine in GM car that people wanted.
This is the other way around.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yeah, but usually it was the Honda engine in GM car that people wanted.
This is the other way around.
Interesting how BEV will change the dynamics of the auto world. The ICE engine/drive train was a real way to differentiate your brand "BMW smooth" or "Honda's silky smooth shifting" are comments I see a lot. I assume all electrics will mostly feel the same (I could be wrong) - all effortless, quiet acceleration. Now it will be down to who has the lightest weight batteries/greatest power density & discharge rates to differentiate (using only "joy of driving" metrics - eMPG's don't count here)- and even that will probably be just a tenth of a second that most wont care about.
 

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Interesting how BEV will change the dynamics of the auto world. The ICE engine/drive train was a real way to differentiate your brand "BMW smooth" or "Honda's silky smooth shifting" are comments I see a lot. I assume all electrics will mostly feel the same (I could be wrong) - all effortless, quiet acceleration. Now it will be down to who has the lightest weight batteries/greatest power density & discharge rates to differentiate (using only "joy of driving" metrics - eMPG's don't count here)- and even that will probably be just a tenth of a second that most wont care about.
+1
GM is definitely in a favorable position to be a leader in the "new" electric vehicle era, especially since it has more experience developing EV technology than any other global automotive OEM.

Honda did well to collaborate with GM. :)
 
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