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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
08-06-04-033B

"If a suspicious hard part failure is observed in the engine, transmission, transfer case or driveline, perform the calibration verification described to determine if a non-GM issued engine calibration is installed. Non GM issued engine calibrations subject driveline components to stresses different than the calibrations which these components were validated to. Repairs to the engine, transmission, transfer case and/or other driveline components where a non-GM engine calibration has been verified are not covered under the terms of the New Vehicle Warranty".

The bulletin goes on telling the dealer to use the Tech 2 to compare the Calibration ID numbers and the Calibration Verification numbers. If the numbers do not match the dealer is to take a digital picture of the Tech 2 screen and send it to GM in an email.

Until the aftermarket finds a way around this you will basically find your warranty voided in case of a powertrain failure having used a programmer. You can reload the factory settings to the pcm, but you can't erase the fact that you downloaded another program in there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's spelled out pretty clearly in the owner's warranty manual.

I'm sure GM legal approved it.

We've got 4x4 Duramax's around here leaving Mustang GT's in the dust from stoplight to stoplight.
 

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If you if shut off the torque management maybe. But to deny it out of hand could get GM into hot water with SEMA.

http://www.sema.org/Main/SemaOrgHome.aspx?ID=50100

1.The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act (15 U.S.C. 2302(C))

This federal law regulates warranties for the protection of consumers. The essence of the law concerning aftermarket auto parts is that a vehicle manufacturer may not condition a written or implied warranty on the consumers using parts or services which are identified by brand, trade, or corporate name (such as the vehicle maker's brand) unless the parts or service are provided free of charge. The law means that the use of an aftermarket part alone is not cause for denying the warranty. However, the law's protection does not extend to aftermarket parts in situations where such parts actually caused the damage being claimed under the warranty. Further, consumers are advised to be aware of any specific terms or conditions stated in the warranty which may result in its being voided. The law states in relevant part:

No warrantor of a consumer product may condition his written or implied warranty of such product on the consumers using, in connection with such product, any article or service (other than article or service provided without charge under the terms of the warranty) which is identified by brand, trade or corporate name... (15 U.S.C. 2302(C)).


Below is a SEMA link on how to deal with Warranty issues:

http://www.sema.org/main/semaorghome.aspx?ID=50096
 

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The sentence immediately following your highlighted one seems to indicate that GM would be within their rights to deny warranty service.
 

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Anybody wasting money on a handheld programmer isn't very bright anyways. Get a custom tuned PCM module, keep the stock module, and replace it when parts break.

Until GM makes stronger components, I have no sympathy.
 

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That's what I was thinking too, RamJet502. Rather than reprogram anything, swapping would seem relatively smart. If the chip in the vehicle at the service department hasn't been reprogrammed with a custom tune, how will they ever know?
 

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That's what I was thinking too, RamJet502. Rather than reprogram anything, swapping would seem relatively smart. If the chip in the vehicle at the service department hasn't been reprogrammed with a custom tune, how will they ever know?
They would never know and a stock replacement pcm module is relatively inexpensive.
 

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Wrong...
Ar MrC posted...http://www.gminsidenews.com/forums/1537698-post1.html

Namely paragraph 3:
The bulletin goes on telling the dealer to use the Tech 2 to compare the Calibration ID numbers and the Calibration Verification numbers. If the numbers do not match the dealer is to take a digital picture of the Tech 2 screen and send it to GM in an email.

A scan with the Tech 2 would identify it as such...

Nice try...


A MODIFICATION voids the warranty...
so tune the stock replacement you bought on ebay, keep the original stock, and there you go.
 

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A scan with the Tech 2 would identify it as such...

Nice try...
Ignorance is bliss.

http://www.blackbearperformance.com/faqs.html

What if I take my truck in for service, should I remove the tune? How is this done?

In most cases, nothing at all will happen. The dealer is unable to disassemble the tune that is on the PCM and read it to determine what, if anything, has been changed by looking at it with a scan tool. Generally, the worst case scenario would be that they have an update for the software on the PCM and will flash over the tune you have. To combat that, you have the option of keeping your stock PCM when I send out a new one for just the cost of a PCM core charge. Then, when it is time to go in for service, all you would need to do would be to swap out the tuned PCM for the stock one.
 

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Anybody wasting money on a handheld programmer isn't very bright anyways. Get a custom tuned PCM module, keep the stock module, and replace it when parts break.

Until GM makes stronger components, I have no sympathy
.

So your saying that GM should beef up all its components so in the future, if the owners decides to add HP nothing will break? Yeah, lets add even more price to a vehicles. That is retarded dude.

The vehicles can handle the power they come with from the factory. If you add more power and something breaks, its your problem, not the company's. Its people like you who I have no sympathy for.
 

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Be all this as it may...having the superchips ad at the bottom of this particular thread is very ironic...
 

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08-06-04-033B

"If a suspicious hard part failure is observed in the engine, transmission, transfer case or driveline, perform the calibration verification described to determine if a non-GM issued engine calibration is installed. Non GM issued engine calibrations subject driveline components to stresses different than the calibrations which these components were validated to. Repairs to the engine, transmission, transfer case and/or other driveline components where a non-GM engine calibration has been verified are not covered under the terms of the New Vehicle Warranty".

The bulletin goes on telling the dealer to use the Tech 2 to compare the Calibration ID numbers and the Calibration Verification numbers. If the numbers do not match the dealer is to take a digital picture of the Tech 2 screen and send it to GM in an email.

Until the aftermarket finds a way around this you will basically find your warranty voided in case of a powertrain failure having used a programmer. You can reload the factory settings to the pcm, but you can't erase the fact that you downloaded another program in there.
I know of a company(Vector) that has and does this already on PCMs. So they already have found a way around it. They call them stealth tunes. They keep the calibration numbers the same and everything. Even use a Tech II to see if they can find any difference between the stock, and tuned PCM's.
 

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I don't see anything new here. Every company is the same way. I don't understand why anyone would think they could change engine/transmission functions away from the factory setting and think they will be covered if something happens. In most cases nothing will happen but a lot of people add hp by bumping up the timing which then requires premium fuel. If you switch to cheap gas and then blow it up it's your own fault because you have changed the engine parameters and didn't allow for as big of a safety margin as the factory tune. Common sense really.

The only issue would be if you bought a used car and didn't know it had a previous tune and you end up having a problem that won't be covered by the warranty because of it.
 

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The vehicles can handle the power they come with from the factory. If you add more power and something breaks, its your problem, not the company's.
I'm not talking about adding a supercharger or cam and expecting that your warranty will still be intact, I'm talking about modifying the air intake and exhaust system to be less restrictive and custom tuning so that full power potential is achieved. Small modifications such as these shouldn't cause early transmission death, but it is common and unacceptable in my opinion.
 

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But can GM GUARANTEE that every authorised ECU update is correctly installed, especially when done by dealers with differing levels of competence - once engine mapping came in, no Vauxhall of mine lasted very long before needing an ECU update to fix an issue!
 
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