GM Inside News Forum banner
1 - 20 of 271 Posts

·
Editor
Joined
·
26,951 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
GMI Exclusive: GM Twin-Turbo V6 Coming
GMI uncovers GM's first high tech, blown V6.
www.gminsidenews.com
March 22, 2010
By: Nick Saporito


Ford Motor Company’s recent introduction of their twin-turbo 3.5L V6 has brought the industry limelight to high tech, forced induction V6 powertrains. Rumors of General Motors joining in on the turbocharged V6 arena have been around for several years now, however GMI has confirmed that The General really will be joining Ford in the high tech turbo bandwagon.

According to GM engineering sources, GM is currently working on a twin-turbo 3.0L V6. Development on the new engine is so far along that it has a RPO code of “LF3.” The naturally aspirated 3.0L debuted in several 2010 products with direct injection and has the code “LF1.”

GMI was not able to obtain projected power ratings on the new engine, however output is very application specific under new SAE testing rules. Sources did say to expect the engine to rival Ford’s EcoBoost 3.5L.

The engine’s introduction is expected in late 2011 or early 2012 in the Cadillac XTS. Sources also state that GM is looking to use the engine in the Cadillac ATS and possibly even the next Chevrolet Camaro. Cadillac has historically always debuted new variants of the High-Feature V6 lineup, so it comes as no surprise that the XTS is the likely to pioneer the 3.0L twin-turbo.

Most rumors surrounding the potential of a turbocharged V6 out of GM have centered on the company’s 3.6L V6. A couple of years ago GMI was told that GM had twin-turbo 3.6L V6’s in development that were generating as much as 435 horsepower. Information regarding the potential of a blown 3.6L silenced for years until GM showed a 3.6L twin-turbo V6-powered Camaro show car at the 2009 SEMA show. The Camaro show car was generating 425 horsepower.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
434 Posts
Why? The 3.0L will likely be able to handle more boost than a 3.6L as well has a higher compression ratio due to the bore.
Right...and it helps explain the existence of the 3.0...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,299 Posts
Why? The 3.0L will likely be able to handle more boost than a 3.6L as well has a higher compression ratio due to the bore.
Exactly! This is a perfect canditate for turbocharging. Hopefully the MPG numbers will be good also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,263 Posts
I hope a version of this engine becomes available in a chevy cruze coupe SS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
Why? The 3.0L will likely be able to handle more boost than a 3.6L as well has a higher compression ratio due to the bore.
Which has a higher compression ratio, the 3.0 or 3.6? It is my understanding that you want lower compression for forced induction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,267 Posts
Glad that GM is doing what it takes to compete, but they're turbocharging the wrong engine.
Maybe because the 3.0 can take boost better, and it's far easier to sell a 3.0L overseas vs a 3.6L? This is (or at least I'm presuming) a global engine after all. Hopefully the engine ends up being more powerful, and more efficient than the 3.6 is. Any word if that is the goal?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,278 Posts
At only 3 liters, I could see this fitting in a Regal GS to replace the aging 2.8 Turbo as an option above the LNF. It's not that much additional weight, so the handing wouldn't be negatively impacted much if any at all. When's the Regal brochure going to be posted today? ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,267 Posts
Why? The 3.0L will likely be able to handle more boost than a 3.6L as well has a higher compression ratio due to the bore.
Um... unless the application is using some trick fuel map or using certian fuels, having a high CR isn't exactly good for boost. DI does help the situation a little.

Come to think of it E85 compatibility should be easily implemented for this application.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,578 Posts
Some countries place a heavy tax on larger engines, which justifies production of smaller supercharged engines to give the horsepower in a smaller package. We don't place much of a penalty on larger engines, and with lower fuel costs, larger engines are a good choice here.
I would think if the 2.8 develops 300 horsepower, then 325 horsepower is well within expectations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,197 Posts
hopefully it will be used in the camaro. i love that GM is finally starting to build performance V6 and 4cyl engines.

I hope they start using the DI 4 in the malibu, it would really put that car in a more competitive place over the camry which is really starting to seem dated out there among the honda, malibu and hyundai.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,064 Posts
Um... unless the application is using some trick fuel map or using certian fuels, having a high CR isn't exactly good for boost. DI does help the situation a little.

Come to think of it E85 compatibility should be easily implemented for this application.
The LNF's CR is 9.2:1, which is high for a turbocharged motor (K04 turbo). E85 would be great in this application. I'd imagine the LF1's CR would be above 10:1.
 
1 - 20 of 271 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top