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I really wish GM had done what Hyundai did in response to fires of Ioniq and Kona vehicles (which use similar LG batteries to the Bolt) and replaced the batteries. This whole effort to band-aid with software limits to charging clearly isn't fixing the real problem.
 

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It probably is. A century later, gas-engine cars still have occasional fire issues.
Majority on car fires, I've seen with ICE are battery related.......... "Short to ground"

At 12 volts it takes a perfect combination of "bad luck" to have an issue, at 240 volts, it only takes "bad luck" (of any kind) to have a "situation".
 

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Majority on car fires, I've seen with ICE are battery related.......... "Short to ground"

At 12 volts it takes a perfect combination of "bad luck" to have an issue, at 240 volts, it only takes "bad luck" (of any kind) to have a "situation".
BMW (among others) begs to differ.
 

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Majority on car fires, I've seen with ICE are battery related.......... "Short to ground"

At 12 volts it takes a perfect combination of "bad luck" to have an issue, at 240 volts, it only takes "bad luck" (of any kind) to have a "situation".
I was visiting my parents some time back. They had a 1971 deuce and a quarter, 455, pretty nice car. I heard a starter start to crank out in the carport. I zipped out there, the 225 was trying to start itself. I didn't know it was unhappy and wanted to run away from home. I called the faahr department then popped the hood and yanked a battery cable off. Problem solved. IIRC it was starting to get a little smoky under there.

Got lektrikical fluid, shorts can happen.
 

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BMW (among others) begs to differ.
You occasionally would have a fuel or oil leak related fire, but most oil-leak fires, is a case where the owner has ignored something for a good long while. The electric ones aren't due to owner neglect, everything is perfectly fine until a "hot" wire (pre fuse or fuseable link) goes short to ground.

There was a specific design-flaw at BMW:

In 2018, following a spate of fires around the world, BMW issued a recall of most of its UK diesel models built between 2011 and 2017 – although the exact dates vary according to the model. Fluids were leaking from the engine’s exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler and in rare circumstances it was found they could ignite.

Following 30 engine fires in 2018 alone, the South Korean government threatened to ban about 20,000 unchecked BMWs from using its roads. Most of the fires there were in 5 Series 2.0 litre diesel models – the same engine as in Lakshmaiah’s car.

In the UK, BMW initially recalled 268,000 diesel cars, and last month added 27,000 to the recall. The problem only affects diesel models.
 
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You occasionally would have a fuel or oil leak related fire, but most oil-leak fires, is a case where the owner has ignored something for a good long while. The electric ones aren't due to owner neglect, everything is perfectly fine until a "hot" wire (pre fuse or fuseable link) goes short to ground.

There was a specific design-flaw at BMW:

In 2018, following a spate of fires around the world, BMW issued a recall of most of its UK diesel models built between 2011 and 2017 – although the exact dates vary according to the model. Fluids were leaking from the engine’s exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler and in rare circumstances it was found they could ignite.

Following 30 engine fires in 2018 alone, the South Korean government threatened to ban about 20,000 unchecked BMWs from using its roads. Most of the fires there were in 5 Series 2.0 litre diesel models – the same engine as in Lakshmaiah’s car.

In the UK, BMW initially recalled 268,000 diesel cars, and last month added 27,000 to the recall. The problem only affects diesel models.
My point with the BMW example is that it doesn't take a "perfect combination of bad luck" (as you said) for an ICE fire. All engineered products have design weaknesses and failure modes and those show up in all products with some non-zero probability.

There's clearly a design flaw with the LG batteries as well. Bolts and Hyundai Ioniq/Konas (prior to replacing the batteries) have been much more prone to fires than any other modern EV.
 
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