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The only, and I mean only thing, RR had over Cadillac in the '50s & '60s was a higher price.
Product-wise, RR wasn't in the same strata as Cadillac, it wasn't a competitive product by any criteria.

A friend owns a '54 Bentley; it's an awful car.
I realise this is a GM dribble site and all, but absurdly grandiose claims like this can’t be let slip through to the keeper.

Eg: 1965 Rolls Silver Shadow featured:

Monocoque construction
All-aluminium V8
4-wheel hydropneumatic suspension with IRS
4-wheel disc brakes

No contemporary Cadillac offered any of the above qualities, not even lowly front discs!

Rolls famously featured hand built assembly.
Whereas GM’s finest were little more than formulaic, tarted up, mass produced Buick/Olds/Chev etc.

Hence in which specific criteria except chrome and glitz was the new Shadow uncompetitive against its corresponding 1965 Cadillac, as per your claim?
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Both bmwboy2007 and 09W do well to start to enumerate Cadillac's/GM's many major and minor engineering advances. I would also submit GM Design's influence during those same times held perhaps equal sway.

But notice the time of those advancements: largely mid-20th century. Those advancements were coincident with the perceived success and brand cache of GM and its separate brands.

09W mentions Oldsmobile, and I cannot help but think of its front wheel drive innovations having been encapsulated in the {gorgeous!] 1966 Toronado. It really was a no-brainer in my mind to buy back then: a luxurious coupe that stood out not just for its contemporaneously advanced powertrain, but because it was wrapped in a show-stopping exterior design! Again, gorgeous!

There's a message there for today's GM and Ultium. Marry advanced engineering and exceptional design, and you will restore GM's former glory, assuming those two are uncompromisingly married consistently up and down all of GM's brands. Hummer, Silverado EV, and Lyriq are a good start, with a few minor compromises. But to think Cadillac presently stands on even similar ground to today's Mercedes, BMW and Audi globally comes across as a bit naive (I temper that criticism, because I quite like many of the people on this site who suggest that even in passing).
Some time in the past year I had posted an article about GM's stock price back in their heyday. They more or less said that GM was the Tesla & Apple combined of today. They said it's hard to take a valuation from back then and put it into today's $$, but if I recall correctly they thought it would be more than Apple and Tesla combined. GM was the exciting stock with all of their innovation and market leadership. I think it is few and far between where a legacy company can recapture that level of excitement from the market without it turning out to be smoke and mirrors (GE).

But, doesn't take away from your point that GM needs to innovate to get at least some of that respect back. I think taking a proactive approach with Ultium, self driving and some less exciting stuff like BrightDrop is a big step in getting some magic back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
There's an issue on this point.

Auto design is in it's 98th percentile of advancement. There could never be another iconic '66 Toronado again because the envelope of design possibilities and allowances has contracted so so much. It was free reign in '66, that even pre-dated the Fed vehicle codebook. Those stunning front fender blades would be dropped by CAFE/aerodynamic concerns & pedestrian impact standards. We'll never see a breakout design in passenger vehicles to that level ever again. We're in a 20-yr stagnant pool of design water right now.
The entire automotive industry is now "mature". Tesla found a way to be seen in a mature industry, but there isn't a lot of low dangling fruit anymore to be seen above everyone else like there was 70+ years ago.
 

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Cadillac historically has presented top tier technology. Cadillac was first to offer V8 engines as standard in 1915. Cadillac was the first to offer a modern electrical system with self starters in 1912. In 1930 Cadillac was the first to offer a V16 engine that offered unsurpassed power and smoothness. In 1949 Cadillac offered a new lightweight OHV V8 engine that revolutionized the industry. Cadillac was the first in the industry to offer a fully automated thermostatically controlled integrated HVAC system in 1964. Cadillac was early in offering automatic transmissions, power steering, power brakes, electric windows and seats, Cadillac was the first in the industry to introduce Phillips head screws in 1937. In 2009 Cadillac was the first to offer all LED headlamps for the North American market on the Escalade. Cadillac has led with many other technology leading examples, as they have done for over a century.
Yes. Cadillac has historically been GM's technology leader. However, that hasn't been the case, for the most part, in recent years. We can't keep pointing to the past, expecting that Cadillac is doing the same in the present. They obviously haven't been at the forefront of much in the past 20-30 years.
Also, Lexus actually was the first to use the LEDs as low beam headlights in 2006. Audi was the first to use them in both low and high beam. Audi was the first to use LED in their DRLs in 2004. Escalade was one of the first with LED lights (though their design made it look bug-eyed), but it was not THE first.

There doesn't seem to be a culture of Cadillac to lead the way at GM. And if there is, it's not well marketed, which is also another issue.
I mean, don't you think the FIRST Ultium-based car should have been a Cadillac? I do...

Cadillac could take the same approach with this theoretical vehicle. Top grade interiors and customization with interior options would be the preferred approach, using magnesium switchgear and other premium materials. So far as the Benz SL, it wouldn't need to "take it on" so much as credibly co-exist as a viable atlernative. It need not be the absolute top performer on a tech sheet, so long as it's a credible real performer. The mid-engine layout provides the basis for that. Sure, it could also be electric, but GM is big enough to provide such an offering with a Blackwing V8 variant in what would would be an extremely low production halo car, further elevating the brand. This provides cover for those at GM that are neurotically obsessed with keeping Corvette the absolute top vehicle in performance.
Performance doesn't need to be "the top performer," but it does need to be credible. Interior and technology and style and perception should always be first and foremost. Cadillac would also need to be able to "sell" that premium image to the buyer. I mean, who exactly would buy a 2+2 GT? Would they buy a Cadillac GT?
 

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There's an issue on this point.

Auto design is in it's 98th percentile of advancement. There could never be another iconic '66 Toronado again because the envelope of design possibilities and allowances has contracted so so much. It was free reign in '66, that even pre-dated the Fed vehicle codebook. Those stunning front fender blades would be dropped by CAFE/aerodynamic concerns & pedestrian impact standards. We'll never see a breakout design in passenger vehicles to that level ever again. We're in a 20-yr stagnant pool of design water right now.
Do you really think so, 09W, though? To a point, I once again agree with you: "the envelope of design possibilities and allowances has contracted so so much...[due to] CAFE/aerodynamic concerns & pedestrian impact standards."

I acknowledge that I am in the clear minority on this site when I say I find the exterior design of the Lyriq rather fetching; I love the 928 feel I get as it is applied to a 2023 Cadillac BEV (recall, Lyriq lead exterior designer, Brian Smith, includes among his personal car collection a 1978 Porsche 928). I love it! Not everyone will, but the design to me is a way in which Cadillac (and GM) can positively differentiate itself from a lot of banal design these days.

Similar things can be said of the Hummer EV P/U and SUV. Nothing about the exterior design says anything but Hummer [in the best possible way]. Hummer exterior + Ultium + some trick features (e.g., Infinity Roof) = every single vehicle intended for production will be sold without profit-sucking incentives (despite parts-bin seats!). And Hummer will cast much in the way of positive light on the GMC brand as a result.

I believe regulations limit design possibilities in some ways, but building on a "skateboard" that houses the powertrain opens up amazing possibilities in other ways, perhaps more so for interior design. I suspect we're only seeing the tip of the iceberg...

This is how you start to recover from decades of self-inflicted reputational damage, GM.
 

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Some time in the past year I had posted an article about GM's stock price back in their heyday. They more or less said that GM was the Tesla & Apple combined of today. They said it's hard to take a valuation from back then and put it into today's $$, but if I recall correctly they thought it would be more than Apple and Tesla combined. GM was the exciting stock with all of their innovation and market leadership. I think it is few and far between where a legacy company can recapture that level of excitement from the market without it turning out to be smoke and mirrors (GE).

But, doesn't take away from your point that GM needs to innovate to get at least some of that respect back. I think taking a proactive approach with Ultium, self driving and some less exciting stuff like BrightDrop is a big step in getting some magic back.
What I suspect it will take for GM to once again prosper reputationally is certainly not easy. But that's the point. Remember in August, 1997 it was Microsoft's Bill Gates who stepped in to save nearly bankrupt Apple, today's market cap behemoth. And more recently, witness Microsoft's own rebirth under Satya Nadella.

We all could recount our favorite business stories in which a once storied company found itself on the ropes to only pull itself together and take the fight.

Today, the automobile industry to me finds itself at an important inflection point. GM could possibly do much more in its pivot to BEV's than simply tread water... if it is hungry enough.
 

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Rolls Royce is dead, long dead, just like Cadillac, these brands no longer have dedicated engineering teams, just dedicated technology integration teams. Sadly, this is no longer 1950’s
 

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I have a friend who owns and is the GM of the local Cadillac dealer. For some years (at least 5), GM has been showing dealers a mockup of a halo sports GT. I even saw a future products comparison sheet he had which had that car (and another one) in silhouette. And when the Corvette C8 was in development, does anyone remember the leaked photos of the key fob where there was a Chevy version AND a Cadillac version? A Cadillac GT car has been lurking for years now.

Of course, any car like this will have to deal with the history Cadillac has had in the last 35 years with cars like this. The Allante was a handsome vehicle and an interior that was pretty good for the day. It was saddled by three problems:

1. Uncompetitive engine. The HT4100/4500 engines just did not compete well against Mercedes OHC designs and Cadillac was still reeling from the original HT4100's reliability problems. A FWD shortened Eldorado chassis probably didn't help.

2. Leaky convertible top. This took far too long to redesign and get fixed.

3. Unprofitable business case. The "build it in two countries" approach was interesting marketing but terrible for cost control when Cadillac's market share was eroding fast from their height in the mid 70s.

By the time the '93 Allante debuted, it was too late.

Fast forward a decade and the XLR is introduced. Again, a GT car with lots of promise, but unable to crack competitive pressures due to poor design choices including:

1. A design that looked something like the Evoq show car from 1999 but lost something in the translation. Still, it didn't look like anything on the road, then or since.

2. Interior design that managed to have less room than the Corvette it was based on. The HVAC controls were literally the same unit as found in the $30,000 CTS, for more than twice the money. And somebody at Cadillac thought a cross branding with Bvlgari would impress customers, but most people could care less.

3. Performance. The Northstar V8 was fine and early kinks had been worked out, but the car was a little under-tired according to reviews and the car's demeanor didn't seem to know what it wanted to be. The XLR-V raised the stakes but it was too late to save initial impressions of the car.

4. The folding top. Cadillac farmed development out to a company who had done the folding tops of other European competitors. But somehow it came to market as a one piece roof which means that you had no cargo space when the top was down. When it debuted, rivals (using the same company for the roof) had a folding design that didn't take up nearly the space. So the best feature was uncompetitive from the start.

So now there has been a GT lurking out there for some time. Will we ever see it? Who knows. But there is an opportunity in the race to electrify the product line. GM has already been working on high performance versions of Ultium powered cars like the Hummer EV and upcoming Corvette hybrid.

But like with everything else, execution is everything. And Cadillac has not executed across all major selling points on most of their products for years. Escalade went to market pretty fully formed. But most others have come with flaws either interior, exterior or drivetrain that drag down the final product. Ironically one of the best interior executions in the last decade was the ELR and that car was hobbled by the unmodified Volt drivetrain in 2014 and the warmed over version in 2016.

The Lyriq needs to be pretty perfect out of the gate and that car already gets launched without the AWD version, which is inexplicable in the premium electric car wars. And whatever the Celestiq ends up being, that car needs to be really special. Like Eldorado Brougham special. Cadillac V16 special. No excuses.
 

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I have a friend who owns and is the GM of the local Cadillac dealer. For some years (at least 5), GM has been showing dealers a mockup of a halo sports GT. I even saw a future products comparison sheet he had which had that car (and another one) in silhouette. And when the Corvette C8 was in development, does anyone remember the leaked photos of the key fob where there was a Chevy version AND a Cadillac version? A Cadillac GT car has been lurking for years now.

Of course, any car like this will have to deal with the history Cadillac has had in the last 35 years with cars like this. The Allante was a handsome vehicle and an interior that was pretty good for the day. It was saddled by three problems:

1. Uncompetitive engine. The HT4100/4500 engines just did not compete well against Mercedes OHC designs and Cadillac was still reeling from the original HT4100's reliability problems. A FWD shortened Eldorado chassis probably didn't help.

2. Leaky convertible top. This took far too long to redesign and get fixed.

3. Unprofitable business case. The "build it in two countries" approach was interesting marketing but terrible for cost control when Cadillac's market share was eroding fast from their height in the mid 70s.

By the time the '93 Allante debuted, it was too late.

Fast forward a decade and the XLR is introduced. Again, a GT car with lots of promise, but unable to crack competitive pressures due to poor design choices including:

1. A design that looked something like the Evoq show car from 1999 but lost something in the translation. Still, it didn't look like anything on the road, then or since.

2. Interior design that managed to have less room than the Corvette it was based on. The HVAC controls were literally the same unit as found in the $30,000 CTS, for more than twice the money. And somebody at Cadillac thought a cross branding with Bvlgari would impress customers, but most people could care less.

3. Performance. The Northstar V8 was fine and early kinks had been worked out, but the car was a little under-tired according to reviews and the car's demeanor didn't seem to know what it wanted to be. The XLR-V raised the stakes but it was too late to save initial impressions of the car.

4. The folding top. Cadillac farmed development out to a company who had done the folding tops of other European competitors. But somehow it came to market as a one piece roof which means that you had no cargo space when the top was down. When it debuted, rivals (using the same company for the roof) had a folding design that didn't take up nearly the space. So the best feature was uncompetitive from the start.

So now there has been a GT lurking out there for some time. Will we ever see it? Who knows. But there is an opportunity in the race to electrify the product line. GM has already been working on high performance versions of Ultium powered cars like the Hummer EV and upcoming Corvette hybrid.

But like with everything else, execution is everything. And Cadillac has not executed across all major selling points on most of their products for years. Escalade went to market pretty fully formed. But most others have come with flaws either interior, exterior or drivetrain that drag down the final product. Ironically one of the best interior executions in the last decade was the ELR and that car was hobbled by the unmodified Volt drivetrain in 2014 and the warmed over version in 2016.

The Lyriq needs to be pretty perfect out of the gate and that car already gets launched without the AWD version, which is inexplicable in the premium electric car wars. And whatever the Celestiq ends up being, that car needs to be really special. Like Eldorado Brougham special. Cadillac V16 special. No excuses.
For a Brand like Cadillac, Buick and GMC, each and every one of them needs made in America as part of its marketing and branding. USA is a huge brand. If they include the Technology to go with America brand, GM would have factories running at full steam.

But UAW and GM generally are too inward looking to see it. Still fighting 19th century workers of the world unite folly battles with an elevator for the CEO.

Meanwhile Musk is living in a tiny home taking on Lockheed, Northrop and the rest of them and winning, after crushing them, and they still have not gotten the memo.
 

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Eg: 1965 Rolls Silver Shadow featured:
Monocoque construction
All-aluminium V8
4-wheel hydropneumatic suspension with IRS
4-wheel disc brakes
No contemporary Cadillac offered any of the above qualities, not even lowly front discs!
Rolls famously featured hand built assembly.
'65 Rolls interior vs. '65 Fleetwood interior.
Merely look at the steering wheels (guess which one is tilt-telescopic with variable-ratio?).

Vehicle Car Motor vehicle Gear shift Speedometer


Vehicle Car Motor vehicle Steering part Automotive design


A close-up of the Roll's HVA/C panel - just sad :

Car Steering part Gas Personal luxury car Machine
 

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'65 Rolls interior vs. '65 Fleetwood interior.
Merely look at the steering wheels (guess which one is tilt-telescopic with variable-ratio?).

View attachment 66112

View attachment 66113

A close-up of the Roll's HVA/C panel - just sad :

View attachment 66114
Aesthetics and perceptions are individual, for sure

However it’s hard to ignore the RR smooth, elegantly simple tiller, as opposed to Cadillac’s ‘Chevelle Grande Luxe’ GM interpretation

Which is mirrored throughout your photo self-evidence : One of which depicts a true luxury automobile, the other is merely a souped up GM base-model evolution

Superb hand-crafted mirror-wood artisan facings, triple chrome, ‘bespoke’ all, succulent Connolly upholstery, carpets, fittings, build, etc, etc, etc...

Old money taste vs New Money gaudiness > add more chrome

Btw as against your previous claims,
I appreciate you quoting and acknowledging uncontested my broad list of in-period RR luxury design/engineering/build superiority above your previous “by any criteria” Cadillac boast, thank you.
 

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I appreciate you quoting and acknowledging uncontested my broad list of in-period RR luxury design/engineering/build superiority above your previous “by any criteria” Cadillac boast, thank you.
You mean the General Motors-designed transmission and the Citroen-designed suspension? I did acknowledge that.
...triple chrome...
You think Cadillac only utilized what- 'double chrome'? 😄
...the RR smooth, elegantly simple tiller...
Listen, it's fine to be an enthusiastic fan of a product, but try and be realistic. That sad rubber/plastic blob belongs in a taxi cab.
...a souped up GM base-model...
By all means, create another list; this time all the parts interchangeability between a '65 Chevelle and a '65 Fleetwood. After all, one's a "rebadge" of the other, built on the same line using the same parts/chassis's, powertrains, because; "General Motors", right?
 

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You mean the General Motors-designed transmission and the Citroen-designed suspension? I did acknowledge that.
Shadow hydra-pneumatic suspensions additionally featured steel springs - as distinct from any Citroen-designed hydraulic vehicles, which do not.

“Rolls-Royce famously claims never to innovate anything, but refine and refine until it attains a bulletproof mechanical perfection.”

For example:

“Cadillac's first unit-body car saw the light of day a decade after the Silver Shadow launched; it used computer-selected rubber isolators on the subframe, engine and suspension in order to maximize the driver's isolation, as long as the rubber stays in decent shape.

“The Shadow's suspension is fully independent, another break with the past: coil-springs and anti-roll bars at both ends. Spring-loaded steel-mesh mounts help isolate the road from the driver--they're aero-grade pieces that don't degrade with the weather. “
 

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I have a friend who owns and is the GM of the local Cadillac dealer. For some years (at least 5), GM has been showing dealers a mockup of a halo sports GT. I even saw a future products comparison sheet he had which had that car (and another one) in silhouette. And when the Corvette C8 was in development, does anyone remember the leaked photos of the key fob where there was a Chevy version AND a Cadillac version? A Cadillac GT car has been lurking for years now.

Of course, any car like this will have to deal with the history Cadillac has had in the last 35 years with cars like this. The Allante was a handsome vehicle and an interior that was pretty good for the day. It was saddled by three problems:

1. Uncompetitive engine. The HT4100/4500 engines just did not compete well against Mercedes OHC designs and Cadillac was still reeling from the original HT4100's reliability problems. A FWD shortened Eldorado chassis probably didn't help.

2. Leaky convertible top. This took far too long to redesign and get fixed.

3. Unprofitable business case. The "build it in two countries" approach was interesting marketing but terrible for cost control when Cadillac's market share was eroding fast from their height in the mid 70s.

By the time the '93 Allante debuted, it was too late.

Fast forward a decade and the XLR is introduced. Again, a GT car with lots of promise, but unable to crack competitive pressures due to poor design choices including:

1. A design that looked something like the Evoq show car from 1999 but lost something in the translation. Still, it didn't look like anything on the road, then or since.

2. Interior design that managed to have less room than the Corvette it was based on. The HVAC controls were literally the same unit as found in the $30,000 CTS, for more than twice the money. And somebody at Cadillac thought a cross branding with Bvlgari would impress customers, but most people could care less.

3. Performance. The Northstar V8 was fine and early kinks had been worked out, but the car was a little under-tired according to reviews and the car's demeanor didn't seem to know what it wanted to be. The XLR-V raised the stakes but it was too late to save initial impressions of the car.

4. The folding top. Cadillac farmed development out to a company who had done the folding tops of other European competitors. But somehow it came to market as a one piece roof which means that you had no cargo space when the top was down. When it debuted, rivals (using the same company for the roof) had a folding design that didn't take up nearly the space. So the best feature was uncompetitive from the start.
Yup. Pretty much why Cadillac had 2 failed attempts at a GT.
And I'm still baffled as to how, for XLR, GM managed to use the exact same supplier of folding roofs the Germans used and managed to green light it when it was twice as slow and took up more room than the Germans.

So now there has been a GT lurking out there for some time. Will we ever see it? Who knows. But there is an opportunity in the race to electrify the product line. GM has already been working on high performance versions of Ultium powered cars like the Hummer EV and upcoming Corvette hybrid.
Is there really a need for a "high performance" version of the Hummer EV?? It's already got 1000 HP.

But like with everything else, execution is everything. And Cadillac has not executed across all major selling points on most of their products for years. Escalade went to market pretty fully formed. But most others have come with flaws either interior, exterior or drivetrain that drag down the final product. Ironically one of the best interior executions in the last decade was the ELR and that car was hobbled by the unmodified Volt drivetrain in 2014 and the warmed over version in 2016.
This version of Escalade is excellent. But it is still lacking some critical features, like true executive seating. Also, I still believe there's room for a higher end Escalade — something Cadillac hasn't even attempted yet.

The Lyriq needs to be pretty perfect out of the gate and that car already gets launched without the AWD version, which is inexplicable in the premium electric car wars. And whatever the Celestiq ends up being, that car needs to be really special. Like Eldorado Brougham special. Cadillac V16 special. No excuses.
Yup. I don't know why it didn't start with the AWD. Cadillac essentially launched with a base/mid range model, which really is inexplicable to me. And while feature for feature, it aligns quite well with the current eTron, the lack of AWD at launch is an oddity to me.
And while Cadillac's AMA on Instagram noted that a 500HP AWD Lyriq is on its way, there's no actual clarity on whether that's just a regular AWD model or a V or a "V-Sport" version. What about an AWD version with the "base" 340HP? It's a weird alignment to me.

I hope Cadillac will do Celestiq justice. Because having a "fully bespoke" car at the $250,000 price point, there's really very little room for error or compromise. And it's the compromises that will kill Celestiq.
 

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Yes. Cadillac has historically been GM's technology leader. However, that hasn't been the case, for the most part, in recent years. We can't keep pointing to the past, expecting that Cadillac is doing the same in the present. They obviously haven't been at the forefront of much in the past 20-30 years.
Also, Lexus actually was the first to use the LEDs as low beam headlights in 2006. Audi was the first to use them in both low and high beam. Audi was the first to use LED in their DRLs in 2004. Escalade was one of the first with LED lights (though their design made it look bug-eyed), but it was not THE first.

There doesn't seem to be a culture of Cadillac to lead the way at GM. And if there is, it's not well marketed, which is also another issue.
I mean, don't you think the FIRST Ultium-based car should have been a Cadillac? I do...



Performance doesn't need to be "the top performer," but it does need to be credible. Interior and technology and style and perception should always be first and foremost. Cadillac would also need to be able to "sell" that premium image to the buyer. I mean, who exactly would buy a 2+2 GT? Would they buy a Cadillac GT?
Yes, I do think Cadillac should have been first, especially since Oldsmobile is no longer around, GM's traditional proving ground division.

I look forward to seeing the execution of Celestiq with great interest. That should be an edifying experience regarding GM's commitment to automotive excellence. GM absolutely cannot go cheap anywhere with Celestiq. IF that vehicle is EVERYTHING it needs to be, then I think that gives Cadillac additional credibility to strike again in another exciting category. Cadillac's recent successes on the race track aren't inconsiderable either. Racing success always lends real credibility to the marque.

Stay tuned !
 

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If there's going to be a car like this, it'll be electric. I would expect massive power - 1000 hp? Sure! They've managed that in the Hummer.

Is it crazy that they'd do such a thing? GM's gotten really good at designing cars with computers - to the point they claim their first Hummer prototypes were remarkably close to production grade. Developing a new car is easier and cheaper than it ever has been. Maybe projects like a fast, expensive supercar (that could be largely shared as a Corvette) will be possible.
 

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I realise this is a GM dribble site and all, but absurdly grandiose claims like this can’t be let slip through to the keeper.

Eg: 1965 Rolls Silver Shadow featured:

Monocoque construction
All-aluminium V8
4-wheel hydropneumatic suspension with IRS
4-wheel disc brakes

No contemporary Cadillac offered any of the above qualities, not even lowly front discs!

Rolls famously featured hand built assembly.
Whereas GM’s finest were little more than formulaic, tarted up, mass produced Buick/Olds/Chev etc.

Hence in which specific criteria except chrome and glitz was the new Shadow uncompetitive against its corresponding 1965 Cadillac, as per your claim?
Thought you would find this interesting: 1965 lux car comparison test. The Cadillac Fleetwood bested only by the newly introduced and heinously expensive Mercedes 600. We think of GM body on frame, live rear axle drum braked cars of that time as quite primitive. I think it's better to look at them as exceedingly refined examples of a breed, and very close to the best of their day..

six-luxury-cars-a-car-and-driver-test-from-1965-with-some-cc-pictures
 

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Aesthetics and perceptions are individual, for sure

However it’s hard to ignore the RR smooth, elegantly simple tiller, as opposed to Cadillac’s ‘Chevelle Grande Luxe’ GM interpretation.

Superb hand-crafted mirror-wood artisan facings, triple chrome, ‘bespoke’ all, succulent Connolly upholstery, carpets, fittings, build, etc, etc, etc...
I find your suggestion that Cadillac quality equates with Chevelle to be rather bizarre, to say the least. Here's three photos of a 1966 Chevelle interior, followed by three from Cadillac, one from Fleetwood SIXTY SPECIAL and two from the convertible Fleetwood Eldorado.

We have fine chrome, leather and wood details in the Cadillac. Rolls Royce wasn't really competitive with the Fleetwood SIXTY SPECIAL that era. The Cadillac had climate control and cruise control and tilt-telescope steering wheel were standard. Electric windows, power brakes, steering and power door locks were standard. Rear passengers were treated to reading tables and footrests.

1966 Chevelle Bucket Seat Interior Photos













 
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