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General Motors Corp. plans to eliminate one shift of vehicle production at its Lansing car-assembly plant early next year, a move which could affect up to 1,400 hourly UAW workers and 150 salaried employees.

The automaker blamed sliding sales of the Pontiac Grand Am and Oldsmobile Alero, which are both made at the plant.

Sales of the Grand Am are down 5.7 percent this year while the Alero and the entire Oldsmobile line is to be discontinued in 2004.

The shift -- one of four at the plant -- is to be eliminated as of Jan. 5, 2004. The Lansing plant has two separate UAW locals that each run two shifts.

Workers at the Lansing plant were told of the move Tuesday.

"This is definitely market driven. We had more output from Lansing than we needed," said GM spokesman Dan Flores. "We don't know yet how many employees will be impacted."

UAW workers at Lansing who lose their jobs should get between unemployment and supplemental pay, 95 percent of normal take-home pay. That amount is then taxed, which means workers actually bring home about 65-70 percent of normal pay.

Full Story HERE
 

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sucks for them, maybe if they if didn't get paid twice as much as non UAW workers they might have kept them on.
 

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Originally posted by Nocturn_Bird@Oct 22 2003, 09:08 PM
sucks for them, maybe if they if didn't get paid twice as much as non UAW workers they might have kept them on.
This guy is a jealous non union person working for next to nothing or else he owns some sweat shop in Mexico and he's rich because of it! How much the workers are paid has nothing to do with closing a G.M. plant! :argue:
 

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Originally posted by dawebguy2000+Oct 22 2003, 09:04 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (dawebguy2000 @ Oct 22 2003, 09:04 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-Nocturn_Bird@Oct 22 2003, 09:08 PM
sucks for them, maybe if they if didn't get paid twice as much as non UAW workers they might have kept them on.
This guy is a jealous non union person working for next to nothing or else he owns some sweat shop in Mexico and he's rich because of it! How much the workers are paid has nothing to do with closing a G.M. plant! :argue: [/b][/quote]
...or he realizes how much the UAW prevents their factories from being truly competitive.
 

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I come from a union family (steelworkers). People tend to forget that they have vacations and holidays and medical benefits because of the unions.
The Fords and the Vanderbilts would not have given up a dime if not forced to do so.
That crap about Henry ford giving a dollar more per employee was really instigated by his vice president. Besides, those working at the Rouge River plant paid back for it in spades with the higher production demands.
There have been problems whereupon the unions, becoming more isolated from the workers, have not met the needs of their industry as well as their members, but this is not the sole reason for the state of the economy or jobs. Software is moving to India, so is even the job of writing your medical prescription.
Everybody wants the other guy to take the fall. Let his job go overseas so that the merchandise is 20% less.
Where is NAFTA? Are they cleaning up the Machinadora? Things getting better down there?
Now, do you want your standard of living to decrease to where you work 70 hour weeks with no benefits or should the rest of the world advance. no more child labor, no more economic slavery. You younger people-choose.
 

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As a GM union employee,I will speak here as I do to the other people I come across.I Make aprrox $1100 week before taxes which includes cost-of-living and shift premium.Aprox 55K a year.On average GM big shots get over a MILLION a year in salary and 100K bonuses like they were a cup of coffee.Plus they get company cars, free plane/jet use, expense accounts.But your blaming me because cars are priced too high and GM is not competitive.
Don't get me wrong I realize I have a good job but when big shots a making more in a day then I do in a year then I have a problem with attacking my salary.
 

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I won't defend the pay packages for American execs. But you'll be hard-pressed to find a reason to defend labor unions (primarily the UAW) to me in this day and age. There was a time when unions helped bring workers up to a reasonable standard of living. But when they prevent companies from being competitive, they force jobs to leave this country. If a plant can't work competitively, the company will fold or find a way to send the jobs elsewhere. Either way, it's not good for the American workers. While a competitive plant may mean fewer workers, it still means workers.
 

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Moving politics aside, The Oldsmobile GM assembly plant on the Grand River in Lansing MI is VERY OLD and is reaching the end of it's life cycle.

It's down to producing three models, The Grand Am, Alero, and Malibu Classic.
Remember, The Malibu was moved a couple of years ago from Oaklahoma assembly to Lansing. This allowed OKLA assembly to focus on trucks.

In the past the 92-98 Skylark, Achieva, & Grand Am came from Lansing.
86 - 91 Somerset Regal, Grand Am, and Calais as well.
Before That, The J-Cars......

With the Alero @ EOL & EOD, The Grand Am (G6) moving on to Orion, The Malibu Classic and Lansing assembly don't seem to have a life beyond '05.

Then in '06, The new Delta Township Plant Opens . This plant's design is patterned after the brand new East Lansing facility that produces the SRX & CTS.

Both new Lansing assembly plants are a much smaller size than traditional assembly plants. Modular component assembly is taken to new heights.

Back in the Mid 90's GM was trying to find a way to improve quality & cut costs.
The answer was Project Yellowstone. This concept was first implemented @ the Blue Macaw assembly facility in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Instead of having 1000's of employees assembling things like instrument clusters, powertrains, etc.. onsite,
suppliers ship the entire inst. cluster, powertrain, integrated interior assembly, etc. completely assembled ready for installation. The size your workforce has been drastically diminished, because now you are only assembling major components on the vehicle, thus saving major time in assembly costs. It also improves quality, as your workforce isn't assembling as many small widgets to put on larger widgets. Plus, any warranty work that is required on a supplier part, the burden of repair cost is shifted to that supplier.

Suppiers themselves are located nearby, so damage to components via distance traveled is minimized.......

The ultimate goal is to have things like doors shipped complete (painted, interior trim, electronics, window etc.) to the assembly center for attachment to the frame.

That goal still remains elusive........

Some of the Yellowstone techniques have been applied to other facilities, Including Saturn's Vue assembly line......

Lansing has one (Soon two) of the most utra modern assembly plants anywhere in the world. Just think of the combinations of vehicles that could be produced @ both!!!!!!!

I'm saddened that people will lose their jobs. It stinks. The reality is many of these people will be able to retire in the next two years while laid off (If those provisions are the same as the '99 contract). The UAW has provided work transition centers in the past. I imagine the others who cannot retire will find their way to the new facility in '06 or if allowed under contract, work @ other facilities until they get the callback.

We need to look forward. The future looks bright for Lansing in the long run!!!.

The Only plant thats left after the assembly plant closes in downtown Lansing is the GM Lansing Metal Center (Fisher Body Div.). ... :(

BTW, What platform is going into the Delta Township Plant? Sigma-Mass?

Ken
 

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Unfortunately for the Union haters above, this shift elimination and eventual plant closing is mainly due to the fact that the buildings are VERY old, and that the platform those cars are built on is going away. Many people thought these plants would have been shutdown along time ago, but actually for an old plant with a bunch of UAW workers we were pretty cost effective and made good cars. So yes it sucks that the plants are closing, but the good news is that a lot of these people can retire and will be welcoming a new plant and enjoying the succes of LGR. These are going to be lean plants and in every new contract I belive the UAW is helping GM be more competitive, they realize its neccasary if GM and it's membership are to survive. Even though its not concrete yet there will probably be a new product(though limited) coming to these aging plants because of the good things these UAW workers can do. Also I believe its only a matter of time before the novelty of the foriegn companys' plants, in the poor southern areas wears off and those workers go Union, and we'll see if the UAW workers really effect competitivenes.
Man I hate when people piss me off because then I ramble! :argue: :argue:
 

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Oh yah almost forgot kmacleod, LGR is in Lansing right in the middle of the Oldsmobile plants, not East Lansing. Ooopps ;)
 

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So you move some workers to Lansing Grand River (adding SRX and STS production)...and when Lansing C and Lansing M close (after the demise of the Grand Am and Classic in 2005), Delta Township will open (two products scheduled). With any luck, by that time, Orion Township (Pontiac G6) will need more workers to fill out two or three shifts. Doesn't sound like too many jobs actually being lost in the area.
 

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IN response to Hudson and others;
I too am an hourly unionized worker in the CAW for DaimlerChrysler in Canada in the process of moving into a salried position. I can assure you that the issues of being non-competitive against foreign rivals has very little to do with the union. Th e big three are spoiled, mismanaged and above all cheap and nasty companies.

Spoiled: As mentioned before company execs are paid a kings ransom yearly regardless of performance. Foriegn execs aren't.

Mismanaged: too many chiefs and departments not enouggh assignment or responsibility.

Cheap: Check any and all domestics of all model levels and compare the quality of material choices to those of the foriegn brands (ie Cavalier vs Corrolla)

These are the main reasons behind losing market share and closing plants.
Granted the big three are paying astronomical costs for pensions and healthcare in the U.S. but don't be fooled, the new domestics (Honda, Toyota, Mitsubishi and Nissan) aren't far behind either and they know it. Just wait until thier workforces begin showing thier age and retiring because most of them have the same benefits as the big three. the only difference is that the foriegn automakers are trying not only to capitalize on market share but to retain it as the Big three did in the 1960's but gradually lost, so they are better prepared for thee circumstances than the big three are today.

There is still a chance for Ford GM and Chrysler if they can offer products that people actually want and want to buy again. But it takes money to make money.

Again Unions are not to blame. Everyone deserves a decent wage and benefits, particularly when a job is monotonous, repetitive and generally boring but is detrimental to producing a final product with double digit profit margins. All the power to those that fought and won to get what they deserve. If there were more organizations like labour unions maybe the standard of living in the US may actually be higher than the cost of living.

At least the US government protects auto jobs. Not every country can be so lucky.
(IE DCX closed the Winsor Maxi Van plant last year, Instead of re tooling for new product DCX opted to build a new assembly plant in non-unionized Georgia for the new Dodge Sprinter model Maxi Vans(a Mercedes variant) although labour costs even in the non-unionized zone would be 30% higher than in Canada DCX chose Georgia on a bribe from the Governor. A $750 million dollar cheuque for construction of the plant and employee training plus years of tax abatements al in the name of preserving American jobs union or not)

Sorry for the ramble, I probbly went of topic
 

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I've been down this debate one too many times.

Fact of the matter is this, it alllllllll goes back to MANAGMENT.

The UAW is told what to build, they build it. Management is to blame for poor products coming out of the design studios. For poor product decisions being made like interior products and the like.

I'll guarantee you that Lutz brings in at LEAST 3 Million in bonuses this year, yet...he works 30 hours per week.

But hell, its the unions fault right? Because they ALWAYS sit in on future product decisions.
 

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I agree with a few (many, actually) of the points made here against the "Big 3." The problem with the UAW is that the union prevents the manufacturers from changing their production methods too much. Everytime GM or Ford wants to make a big change (Project Yellowstone, for example), the union pushes its weight around. The problems are hardly only on the side of the UAW, but the UAW (and the CAW, for that matter) is far from innocent.
 
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