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For those with short memories, GM Canada had a good year in 2014. Sales grew 6.3 per cent, slightly better than the 6.1 per cent of the overall market. But longer memories will know the uptick came after years of declining power and influence. GM once reigned unchallenged as the world and North American sales leader; it still holds that rank in the United States, but in Canada it remains mired in third behind Ford and Chrysler. GM Canada hasn’t led the Canadian market in sales since 2009.

GM Canada president Steven Carlisle responds by talking about quality of sales. “Quality is what we did last year and we’re pretty pleased with it.” In this context “quality” means selling fewer cars, but at higher unit profit than chasing after big fleet sales that boost numbers but bring to mind the old saw, “we lose money on every one we make, but we make it up with the volume.”

The relative resurgence of premium brands Buick and Cadillac in Canada – up 31 and 10 per cent respectively in 2014 – supports that strategy, and it can only be further strengthened by new models like the Cadillac CTS-V and (though only in the United States) the Buick Cascada convertible debuting this week in Detroit.

But those are niche products. Even if GM Canada isn’t chasing volume by giving vehicles away to fleets, it still needs more sales in the heart of the market. At the Detroit auto show, there’s still no sign of anything that’s going to fill that need. But according to GM product supremo Mark Reuss, change is coming “very soon.”

How urgently are those new products needed? Consider this: before the Honda Civic rose to ascendance in the late 1990s, Canada’s top-selling car for many years was the Chevrolet Cavalier; yet Cavalier’s current equivalent, the compact Cruze – now in its fifth model year – ranked a distant fifth in passenger-car sales last year, outsold almost 2:1 by the Civic.

In mid-size sedans the Malibu managed no better than eighth last year, while the excellent Impala is also a laggard in the full-size sedan category.

In another key segment, compact CUVs, combined sales of GM’s Chevrolet Equinox and GMC Terrain siblings only ranked fourth in segment as their sales slipped last year in a growth market. With designs that go back to mid 2009, fresh blood is needed there.

GM did get an early start, though, in the up-and-coming sub-compact CUV category, with the Chevrolet Trax and its sister car, the Buick Encore (the Trax, incidentally, was initially exclusive to Canada; the U.S. only gets it for 2015).

In Canada’s other high-volume (and high-profit) vehicle segment, large pickups, the Chevrolet Silverado/GMC Sierra twins retained second place in sales behind the Ford F-Series, and even gained a sliver of market share. But the Ram Truck is closing in fast. After a rather cautious (read: inexpensive) do-over for 2014 the GM trucks are likely turning a tidy profit for GM, but they look awfully conservative in a category of gas-guzzlers where Ford has boldly switched to weight-saving aluminum and Ram offers the category’s only (so far) diesel in a 1500.

GM’s product supremo Mark Reuss, however, defends the GM trucks. Their conventional but highly optimized technologies may be “less flashy from a PR standpoint,” but offer long-term benefits that customers really value, and at no extra cost.

And as for GM’s aging or under-performing passenger cars, Reuss promises an onslaught of new products this year. He told Globe Drive that GM has learned a lot about saving costs through economies of scale – i.e., sharing components not only across different models but also through successive generations of those cars. In the next six to 12 months, we’ll see the results of that strategy as GM launches five new cars that Reuss says will be more profitable than their predecessors, while offering customers much bolder styling, more-efficient powertrains and better value than the cars they replace.

Meanwhile, separately, GM has announced a huge investment in future Cadillacs, with a focus on CUVs. Unlike in Canada, Cadillac’s U.S. sales fell last year.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/glob...-focuses-on-quality-of-sales/article22419792/
 

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To be true, i found less and less reasons for Canadians to buy GM vehicles ( ex: Canada also put money for GM bailout and GM mgmt move operations more towards Mexico by even closing some of the best known quality plants of GM) and charges premium on pricing also.

Now if some Canadian interested in GM, it may be due to some blind belief he has from past or the if products are soo Good (real industry leading products ).
 

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For the 5th straight year Ford has been on top in Canada. And yes both Retail and Fleet wise. So Ford is not just dumping vehicles to Enterprise.

47th Year for the F150 as #1, yes this may have to do with Twins. But I believe that Korean Daewoo purchase and putting everything on the line with it, is more to blame than anything.
 

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According to a lot of articles and comments I've read over the years, GM Canada died when Pontiac died.

Is this true?
You'll get a different opinion from Pontiac fans, but I'd say "not really". Pontiac in Canada has always been a bit different than Pontiac in the US. Before the Auto Pact in the late 60s, Canadian Pontiacs featured US Pontiac styling on Chevrolet chassis -- and powertrains. Here, Pontiacs were a small cut above Chevy, but not as differentiated as Pontiac in the US was in its heyday. More recently, Canada's volume in smaller, less expensive cars meant that Pontiac did a lot of volume in Sunfires, Vibes and Grand Ams: hardly the stuff Pontiac built its reputation on, but quite in keeping with the brand's history here. They sold on styling and price and I suspect it wasn't hugely profitable volume or Pontiac would still be here.

The folks that bought Sunfires now seem to be gravitating to Hyundia and KIA. I suspect the big difference is that the Koreans are making money in the cars they sell here!

That all said, its worth keeping in mind that Canada has no true 'domestic' automakers. Everything is a branch plant. Honda builds cars here. Toyota builds cars just down the road from where I live and opened a new plant about an hour away. And, despite us bailing out both GM and Chrysler, both have made noises about reducing or closing plants here if further government assistance isnt forthcomimg. Oshawa, for example, has consistently been a highly productive plant with good quality, yet it's not getting new product and its futire is uncertain. Not surprisingly, there isn't the emotional attachment to the 'big three' here -- at least not to folks younger than about 60.
 

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I would also add is GM has NOT done a good job on pricing there products + warranty is not that good as Mits and Kia offer 10 year warranties and Mazda is advertising unlimited milage warranties
+ hatch backs and station wagons sell well in Canada and GM has none after killing the HHR and Vibe
 

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Oh how the mighty have fallen. Just 10 short years ago, GM's market share in Canada was 28.9%. It's now 13.5%. Sales in 2002 were 520,748. In 2014, Canada's best year ever for auto sales, GM Canada sold 249,800. It wasn't that long ago that GM Canada sold more than Ford and Chrysler COMBINED. Now they're barely ahead of Hyundai-Kia. I don't know what the answer is. When GM closed 40% of the dealerships in Canada, it's as if all those customers switched brands, rather than moving to the next closest GM store. Goes to show that many people care about the dealer more than the product itself.
 

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Oh how the mighty have fallen. Just 10 short years ago, GM's market share in Canada was 28.9%. It's now 13.5%. Sales in 2002 were 520,748. In 2014, Canada's best year ever for auto sales, GM Canada sold 249,800. It wasn't that long ago that GM Canada sold more than Ford and Chrysler COMBINED. Now they're barely ahead of Hyundai-Kia. I don't know what the answer is. When GM closed 40% of the dealerships in Canada, it's as if all those customers switched brands, rather than moving to the next closest GM store. Goes to show that many people care about the dealer more than the product itself.
Seems like GM is more interested in putting their energy into their two biggest markets, the US and China, and Europe when they have the time. I wouldn't think that success in Canada on par with what they have in the US would be easy enough, but it seems that is not the case. One thing GM should remember is that Canada is Cadillac's (distant) third largest market, and was up for the year, in comparison to the tumble south of the border.
 

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For the 5th straight year Ford has been on top in Canada. And yes both Retail and Fleet wise. So Ford is not just dumping vehicles to Enterprise.

47th Year for the F150 as #1, yes this may have to do with Twins. But I believe that Korean Daewoo purchase and putting everything on the line with it, is more to blame than anything.
I am quite certain that up until 2010, GM trucks outsold Ford
 

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According to a lot of articles and comments I've read over the years, GM Canada died when Pontiac died.

Is this true?
It is a tough question to answer. Pontiac was a big part of GM Canada and 10 years ago (before GM Canada started to slide) the brand made up about 25% of sales. GM Canada now only sells about 55% of the vehicles they did 10 years ago. Losing Pontiac was significant but there are clearly much bigger issues that have resulted in the decline of GM.
 

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Chrysler would be the top carmaker in Canada, but aren't only because Ford dumps a lot of trucks into fleets compared to very few for Chrysler. Anecdotally when I was shopping for a truck I almost never saw any ex-fleet Rams, while probably 40%+ of the Fords were ex-fleet. If I were buying a used trucks today I would probably have to buy a Ford because the resale on Dodge trucks is too high. Chrysler sells way more non-trucks than Ford does.




Ram consistently sells almost as much as Silverado and Sierra combined. Chrysler is just much bigger relative to the market in Canada than they are in the US. They have relatively about as many dealers in each major city as Ford does, they make more vehicles in Canada than anyone else (all the LX cars in Windsor, the minivans in Brampton) and people just like them more than Americans do. with the way Chrysler's trajectory is going these days unless GM is somehow conquering shoppers from Toyota/Honda then they are not going to be any market share gains in the near future.
 
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