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The RHD versions come from Thailand, so being produced for RHD Asian markets as well as Australia
As well as the UK eventually I guess.

The other thing with cars like the Veloster is that because they share the same mechanical underpinnings (platform) as one of their high volume models (i30/Elantra perhaps) so all of the RHD engineering has already been done.

Dr Terry
 

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As well as the UK eventually I guess.

The other thing with cars like the Veloster is that because they share the same mechanical underpinnings (platform) as one of their high volume models (i30/Elantra perhaps) so all of the RHD engineering has already been done.

Dr Terry
There's no sign at present of the 2nd generation Veloster being imported into the UK - it would likely just take sales from the I30 if they did.
 

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The RHD versions come from Thailand, so being produced for RHD Asian markets as well as Australia
Australian spec Veloster's come from South Korea, not Thailand. Imports began in mid 2019 to Australia from South Korea. Yes Hyundai are planning to build cars in Thailand, but as far as I'm aware, the plant hasn't built any yet.
 

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The RHD versions come from Thailand, so being produced for RHD Asian markets as well as Australia
Australian spec Veloster's come from South Korea, not Thailand. Imports began in mid 2019 to Australia from South Korea. Yes Hyundai are planning to build cars in Thailand, but as far as I'm aware, the plant hasn't built any yet.
OK, got it.
but isn't it strange that Hyundai is even looking at Thai production of Veloster, will it move RHD production to there
or is that plant to cover only production in Thailand's region/ near by markets?
Would Hyundai be reconsidering those plans now that sales seem to be declining for all vehicles...
 

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Discussion Starter #65
OK, got it.
but isn't it strange that Hyundai is even looking at Thai production of Veloster, will it move RHD production to there
or is that plant to cover only production in Thailand's region/ near by markets?
Would Hyundai be reconsidering those plans now that sales seem to be declining for all vehicles...
Good final question, and I am sure there's plenty of chin stroking trying to work out how to best manage Hyundai RHD production, considering it also occurs in Czech Republic. My concern is that Hyundai have earned their stripes with main stream products and are now taking some risks (Veloster being one, with EVs also being an expensive exercise, though with better potential future return). This next 12 months (at least) is going to be tight. Hopefully they haven't over extended themselves.
 

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OK, got it.
but isn't it strange that Hyundai is even looking at Thai production of Veloster, will it move RHD production to there
or is that plant to cover only production in Thailand's region/ near by markets?
Would Hyundai be reconsidering those plans now that sales seem to be declining for all vehicles...
Hyundai could very well look at moving RHD production to the Thai plant for the Veloster and move into other RHD markets, but then again, it could just be for their local region. Mazda built the BL, BM and BN Series Mazda 3 in Thailand, but they weren't exported to Australia, same as the Ford Ecosport, the Ecosport was built in Thailand as well, but again, they weren't exported to Australia. Malaysia too builds cars that you normally wouldn't think would be built there, like Peugeot's and Citroens, like the 208 and 308 hatch, 2008 SUV and Citroen C4 Picasso, so I guess just because something is built in a certain country, doesn't mean it'll see the light of day in another country.

I think any manufacturer in this current climate would be seriously re-thinking any of their previous future announcements.
 

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Good final question, and I am sure there's plenty of chin stroking trying to work out how to best manage Hyundai RHD production, considering it also occurs in Czech Republic. My concern is that Hyundai have earned their stripes with main stream products and are now taking some risks (Veloster being one, with EVs also being an expensive exercise, though with better potential future return). This next 12 months (at least) is going to be tight. Hopefully they haven't over extended themselves.
RHD really isn't rocket science. Well, except for GM.

The biggest RHD cost is during the platform development stage. Having said that, new model/platform development is now significantly cheaper and more streamlined than even a decade ago - there is some amazing software available these days.

At the production stage, RHD presents zero challenge. The only incremental cost is the extra "complexity" - more individual components in the supply chain. It's really no different to offering, for example, optional sunroof - if it's profitable, why not offer it.

Just look at PSA. They build Peugeot 3008, 5008 and Citroen C5 Aircross - same platform, mechanically "almost identical" - at 2 different plants in both LHD and RHD. And Opel's factory builds its equivalent Grandland in LHD and RHD. And then, using the same platform, their French plant builds Expert/Dispatch/Vivaro/Proace, while their UK plant builds Expert/Dispatch/Vivaro. Both RHD and LHD. Again, zero issues. It's just some additional part numbers.
 

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RHD really isn't rocket science. Well, except for GM.

The biggest RHD cost is during the platform development stage. Having said that, new model/platform development is now significantly cheaper and more streamlined than even a decade ago - there is some amazing software available these days.

At the production stage, RHD presents zero challenge. The only incremental cost is the extra "complexity" - more individual components in the supply chain. It's really no different to offering, for example, optional sunroof - if it's profitable, why not offer it.

Just look at PSA. They build Peugeot 3008, 5008 and Citroen C5 Aircross - same platform, mechanically "almost identical" - at 2 different plants in both LHD and RHD. And Opel's factory builds its equivalent Grandland in LHD and RHD. And then, using the same platform, their French plant builds Expert/Dispatch/Vivaro/Proace, while their UK plant builds Expert/Dispatch/Vivaro. Both RHD and LHD. Again, zero issues. It's just some additional part numbers.
Precisely my point

The knuckle draggers on here cannot seem to comprehend this fact ( not pointing at mikmak by the way :) )
 

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The difference being that US companies don’t through develop RHDs at the same time as their LHD domestic stuff, even Ford did the RHD Mustang dev well after lefty was on sale.

Now contrast that with Ford Europe’s vehicles and Ford Asia’s Ranger/ Everest, RHD and LHD on sale at the same time. Definitely a difference in philosophy and execution.
 

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The difference being that US companies don’t through develop RHDs at the same time as their LHD domestic stuff, even Ford did the RHD Mustang dev well after lefty was on sale.

Now contrast that with Ford Europe’s vehicles and Ford Asia’s Ranger/ Everest, RHD and LHD on sale at the same time. Definitely a difference in philosophy and execution.
That's not totally true - GM's E2xx platform had so much US involvement that ignored the high power engine positioning on RHD vehicles which meant that UK and Australia never got a performance version of Insignia/Regal/Commodore - it's not a matter of timing, more a matter of blinkered vision.
 

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Once you take away what is a Holden and replace it with something else

Well who can blame anyone for walking away

Ford was doing not much better in Australia sales wise for ages but because Ford had a steady stream of RHD vehicles to choose from they continued

30 other brands sell less than what Holden was offering up each month but again they sell RHD elsewhere

GM is the only brand that I know of that gives up and runs away from markets that are too hard (in their own mind) to sell in
"Shrink your way to world domination." Mary Barra
 

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If I were steering the ship of GM, I'd be deeply embarrassed over the whole RHD thing and their complete incompetence in understanding more or less every market outside of NA and China.
 

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If I were steering the ship of GM, I'd be deeply embarrassed over the whole RHD thing and their complete incompetence in understanding more or less every market outside of NA and China.
And if reading GMI is anything to go by, they don't understand the car market in NA, just the truck sector.
 

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Discussion Starter #75
"Shrink your way to world domination." Mary Barra
Ahhh of course! MB is turning GM into a boutique manufacturer, so they can charge more per unit. Why didn't I think of that?

Keep an eye out for Mark Ruess turning up to work in jogger pants and loafers with no socks.
 

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Discussion Starter #76
If I were steering the ship of GM, I'd be deeply embarrassed over the whole RHD thing and their complete incompetence in understanding more or less every market outside of NA and China.
No argument here, at least on the surface. Still, we don't get to see the difficult parts of the business, like the union negotiations, the overheads left from previous poor investment (such as pushing maintenance out to achieve lower annual costs, but inducing a plant failure).

There is a very good chance that in a company this old (even if it's only 12 years old...) and this big, there are problems ingrained in the system.

Beyond that, their response to the Australian market is a pretty standard business approach. If you looked at Holden sales over the last 5 years, and particularly over the last 12 months, (answer this as a business owner) what would you do?

Personally, I would have fixed the SK market first to provide growth in Asia and RHD for the Asia Pacific Region, managing IO from Singapore, but I'm saying that without upderstanding just how much of a hold Thailand has thanks to a supportive gov.

We really only get to see the fun part of other peoples jobs. Not the dirty stuff that keeps them up at night.
 

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No argument here, at least on the surface. Still, we don't get to see the difficult parts of the business, like the union negotiations, the overheads left from previous poor investment (such as pushing maintenance out to achieve lower annual costs, but inducing a plant failure).

There is a very good chance that in a company this old (even if it's only 12 years old...) and this big, there are problems ingrained in the system.

Beyond that, their response to the Australian market is a pretty standard business approach. If you looked at Holden sales over the last 5 years, and particularly over the last 12 months, (answer this as a business owner) what would you do?

Personally, I would have fixed the SK market first to provide growth in Asia and RHD for the Asia Pacific Region, managing IO from Singapore, but I'm saying that without upderstanding just how much of a hold Thailand has thanks to a supportive gov.

We really only get to see the fun part of other peoples jobs. Not the dirty stuff that keeps them up at night.
As a business owner I understand what you are getting at however the sales over the last few years have been a decade or more in the making. Covid-19 is one of those shocks that nobody saw coming and recovery will be a long process. However, the poor product being served up by Holden has been poor compared to it's competitors or failed by terrible marketing combined with little appetite to let a model develop it's own place in it's respective class and gain recognition positive reputation before being culled and replaced by something else totally different.

If I was a senior exec in the ship that put Holden into this position, I'd probably take it as a sign that my best days are behind me and retire before I totally bugger up the mother ship. Bottom line is many of the people who allowed Holdens sales disaster are still running GM at senior Exec or board level and having taken a brand from #1 market share to closure in a little over 15 years is not something I'd want on my resume. Maybe there is a career waiting for them at Ford?
 

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Discussion Starter #78
As a business owner I understand what you are getting at however the sales over the last few years have been a decade or more in the making. Covid-19 is one of those shocks that nobody saw coming and recovery will be a long process. However, the poor product being served up by Holden has been poor compared to it's competitors or failed by terrible marketing combined with little appetite to let a model develop it's own place in it's respective class and gain recognition positive reputation before being culled and replaced by something else totally different.

If I was a senior exec in the ship that put Holden into this position, I'd probably take it as a sign that my best days are behind me and retire before I totally bugger up the mother ship. Bottom line is many of the people who allowed Holdens sales disaster are still running GM at senior Exec or board level and having taken a brand from #1 market share to closure in a little over 15 years is not something I'd want on my resume. Maybe there is a career waiting for them at Ford?
In ...unrelated news, Stephen Jacoby no longer works for GM. He's an "indpendent consultant".
 

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Holden's sales dropped because when the US managers came in they decided that fleet sales weren't what they wanted. They completely had no idea of how things were done here and screwed things up monumentally. The Commodore, Falcon and Camry sold in the droves to the fleet and then all of a sudden this market segmented severely as this line of US managers came to being at Holden. These 3 cars were over 50% of the market in the year 2001. This was because they were all fleet darlings. Losing the fleet is what killed these Australian made vehicles.
 

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Holden's sales dropped because when the US managers came in they decided that fleet sales weren't what they wanted....
Correct. One of DM's first "executive decisions" (around 2004) was to tell Telstra, and a few other major fleet customers, to literally f/off. Telstra used to buy around 15,000 p.a. Commodore wagons at that time.

GM decided to pursue private sales instead, with their finest Daewoo product.
 
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