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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ford system tracks cops' driving
Chris Woodyard,
USA TODAY
October 27, 2014


LOS ANGELES — Police officers, many of whom are already wearing body cameras, now may have their police car driving skills scrutinized, as well.

The Los Angeles Police Department is testing new technology in 50 police cruisers that will allow supervisors to keep a close eye on whether officers are hot-dogging around the city instead of setting an example of careful driving. It also monitors whether officers are wearing their seat belts.

The system is the joint effort between Ford and a technology company, Telogis, of Aliso Viejo, Calif. It's a factory-installed option for police agencies ordering either the Police Interceptor sedan — a redone Taurus — or SUV — a law-enforcement version of the Explorer.

Both companies say they see the system as an important step forward.

"The leading cause of death of police officers is crashes," says Gary Oldham, manager of public safety business development for Telogis. And with little more than four of 10 police officers believed to be wearing seat belts on a regular basis while patrolling, "We're losing too many cops where it is preventable."

The new system, called Ford Telematics powered by Telogis for Law Enforcement, measures factors like speed compared to the posted limit, seat belt usage, harsh braking and acceleration, whether the car has spun out, the status of the anti-lock braking system, yaw and airbag status. While telematics systems like this have become popular among fleet operators in recent years to keep track of their vehicles in real time, this one is customized for police use. For instance, it can tell supervisors when the telematics correlate with use of the light bar — the red and blue emergency lights on a top of a car — indicating the car was on an emergency call or pursuit.

More at link: http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/2014/10/27/ford-telogis/17991301/
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I could see the rank and file cops not liking this, but as a taxpayer I do like it. The cop cars aren't toys and shouldn't be driven like one, nor are the police above the law. A system like this will keep the cars honest.

And if they can also get the cops to wear seatbelts it is a huge win. To not wear a seatbelt is nuts, I don't see that many cops being shot at, etc. - i.e. the need to get out of their car that quickly - that excuse is bull. I see no justification for a police officer to not wear one.
 

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I could see the rank and file cops not liking this, but as a taxpayer I do like it. The cop cars aren't toys and shouldn't be driven like one, nor are the police above the law. A system like this will keep the cars honest.
And if they can also get the cops to wear seat belts it is a huge win. To not wear a seatbelt is nuts, I don't see that many cops being shot at, etc. - i.e. the need to get out of their car that quickly - that excuse is bull. I see no justification for a police officer to not wear one.
What's good for the goose is good for the gander. Scrutinizing the cops and their activities is a good idea. The good ones have nothing to fear, the bad ones will get found out.
Especially seat belts - a known safety factor. How about if insurance doesn't pay for their accident injuries if they haven't been wearing their seat belts, and they get issued a ticket for their illegal non-compliance?
 

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There have been too many times where I have seen the cops driving as bad or worse than the regulars out on the roads. For the most part I see this and the body cam as a good thing. I have nothing against law enforcement but think there are some who give the rest a bad name.
and on the flip side it will also protect the cops from false accusations IE the "country road" beat down as the car was never out of the city to give the "perp" the beat down in the dark
not to mention MORE evidence AFTER a police chase in court
 

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I see most are looking at it from a "damn cops" point of view. But let me give you a little insight. In most jurisdictions lights and sirens are reserved for bad car crashes, shootings, stabbings, medical emergencies and in progress burglaries. That means if your getting your ass kicked and your assailant isn't armed, your officer will be coming to you at the speed limit. With this tech you'l wait longer for when the kids are egging your house, your neighbor is yelling obscenities at you for cutting down a branch, your wanting to report your ex-gf keying your car or just about anything else that is of huge importance for you that day. People already complain about how long the cops took to get to wherever, expect longer wait times now.

Cops aren't out joy riding in their patrol vehicles. If they're speeding, 99% of the time it's to get to the calls that are stacked up on their screen in a decent amount of time. This is just my outlook on it.
 

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Jack down, people and stop the media-induced cop-bashing. Don't be sheep!

The black boxes already in every car (not just cop cars) already record the vast majority of this information and it's available to the Police Administration if they need it such as when investigating a serious Officer involved crash. It's also available to the Police for your vehicle when you're in a serious crash. This is pushed by the insurance industry as they want to assess liability.

As for the poster who has "seen the cops driving as bad or worse than the regulars out on the roads," you see a snippet of that Officer's actions without knowing why they are doing what they are doing. There is legal justification for Officers to break traffic laws and other laws in the interest of public safety. The Officers know that when they choose to do it, they assume tremendous liability for any crashes, injuries, or deaths they cause, which is why they choose to violate those laws only when necessary and not willy-nilly as some would have you believe. And, yes, they know that, "cop cars aren't toys and shouldn't be driven like one."

As for seatbelts, not every state requires that they be worn by cops and others all of the time. Drivers who make frequent stops such as delivery drivers and cops are exempt from some. In those states, the vast majority of Police Departments' rules mandate that Officers wear their belts. So, if you see a local Officer in your community not wearing his/her belt, call and tell the watch commander and he will address it.

Lastly, I'm not against the idea of body cams but would want to know when other professions will begin using them. When will doctors and surgeons start wearing them? Lawyers? What about taxi drivers? Limo drivers? UPS and Fed Ex drivers? Insurance claims adjusters? Mechanics? Repairmen? Any factory worker who builds a part that, should it fail, injuries or deaths could occur? What about legislators? Liability can be assessed to many, many jobs. Insurance companies make a lot of money by not paying out claims due to their ability to lay blame on others. Are you ready for cameras everywhere including on you as you do your job 8 hours a day? Get used to the idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I don't think it's an issue of being against the cops, I fully support the police and respect them, even while they are issuing me speeding tickets. If I speed and get caught, then I deserve the ticket.

And I am fully aware that they don't always use their lights, etc.. But unlike other jobs (doctors, lawyers, etc) they are "the law" and are in the position to abuse it and I see no reason not to have something like this. The honest ones will have no issue with this because they aren't doing anything wrong. The loudest cries will be from the cops that do abuse their privaleges.

Though I do agree that there have to be controls surrounding the use of such technologies. Cops shouldn't be fined/harassed for doing 1 mph over the speed limit, etc. just like the rest of us shouldn't. The tech needs to be responsibly used, just like the cops authority has to be responsibly used.
 

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When does the civilian version come out??
 

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little more than four of 10 police officers believed to be wearing seat belts on a regular basis while patrolling,

LAPD has some serious well-known police behavior issues. I read recently that at least half of the LAPD cars that had trial GPS locators had those locators' antennae disabled or the devices otherwise inactivated.

Sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander. If you're going to enforce laws, obey them.

I know the Little Rock PD was considering GPS locators many years back.

A Spokane Co. (WA) deppity was recently revealed to be spending hours at his girlfriend's house having sex while pretending to be on patrol. From time to time he'd call in and check a plate or something to give the impression he was roaming. Couldn't find the link but here's another:
http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2013/aug/16/deputy-fired-for-having-on-duty-sex/

Yes, PDs have rules regarding siren and light use. There are always a few who abuse their privileges. So all will have to be monitored. In LA, this is past due. These people are our SERVANTS, not our masters. If they are monitoring the behavior of the public, what's wrong with their behavior being monitored?
 
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