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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ford and Purdue University Created a Cable That Fully Charges an EV in 5 Minutes (msn.com)
November 13, 2021
Bryan Hood

Hood Automotive design Motor vehicle Fender Vehicle door


Ford may have just figured out a way to get rid of range anxiety once and for all.

The Detroit auto giant has teamed up with Purdue University to build a prototype of a cable that could fully charge an EV’s battery in just five minutes. There’s still a lot of work that needs to be done, but the cable could help overcome one of the last major obstacles standing in the way of battery-powered cars achieving mass acceptance.

EV driving ranges may finally be reaching acceptable levels, but slow charging times still make some drivers wary. The last couple years has seen charging times improve dramatically, but they’re still not great, especially when compared to the five minutes it takes to fill up a gas-powered car. Right now, the best you can hope for is around 20 minutes when connected to a DC fast charger. It’s even worse when you’re home. The Ford Mustang Mach-E is one of the more in-demand EVs on the market, but it takes 11 hours to charge to full capacity at home, even when connected to a Level 2 charging setup.

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From the article:
“Unfortunately, you won’t be able to fill up your EV that quickly anytime soon. In addition to Ford and Purdue’s cable—for which a patent is currently pending—new chargers and batteries capable of safely dealing with that much current will need to be developed. Still, the ability to fully charge a battery powered vehicle in minutes is now a very real possibility.”
 

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I had no idea the charging cable was one of the limiting factors to recharge times. I thought it was the batteries.
I’m sure it will still be the batteries for frequent charges. Once they find a way to make a 5 minute charge that isn’t detrimental to the life of the battery then it gets rid of the most common excuse from the people who claim to drive these crazy distances every week.

From the article:
“Unfortunately, you won’t be able to fill up your EV that quickly anytime soon. In addition to Ford and Purdue’s cable—for which a patent is currently pending—new chargers and batteries capable of safely dealing with that much current will need to be developed. Still, the ability to fully charge a battery powered vehicle in minutes is now a very real possibility.”
Whoops missed that. So essentially they are talking about future potential. In that case no kidding.
 

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I had no idea the charging cable was one of the limiting factors to recharge times. I thought it was the batteries.
Yeah, I question this, too. I think it's a function of the batteries, not the cable. Overheating, longevity.
 

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It's the whole chain. The power connection to the location, then the cabling to the charger station, the connector to the vehicle, and then the wiring in the vehicle itself, and the battery. Any of them can be the limiting factor as to how much power can be transmitted at any given time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
It's the whole chain. The power connection to the location, then the cabling to the charger station, the connector to the vehicle, and then the wiring in the vehicle itself, and the battery. Any of them can be the limiting factor as to how much power can be transmitted at any given time.
What I don't fully understand, and maybe because I don't have the right background I won't, but I'd think electric delivery is something we've been doing for 100 years and there has got to be higher capacity wires/uses out there. Why is it a problem with charging batteries? Is it that a huge piece of equipment will have a number of electric lines going into it so they aren't bundled together and therefore avoid overheating? And does the need for it to be idiot proof for the public also add a layer of problems vs. that huge piece of equipment whose electric cables are probably tucked away where people won't be constantly touching them and moving them?
 

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I had no idea the charging cable was one of the limiting factors to recharge times. I thought it was the batteries.
Yeah, I question this, too. I think it's a function of the batteries, not the cable. Overheating, longevity.
It's the whole chain. The power connection to the location, then the cabling to the charger station, the connector to the vehicle, and then the wiring in the vehicle itself, and the battery. Any of them can be the limiting factor as to how much power can be transmitted at any given time.
Color me skeptical. I'd think the batteries and vehicle wiring would be the limiters. This looks like some sort of April Fool joke. What I CAN imagine is a bunch of wiring systems sizzling and a bunch of exciting battery explosions and fires. Yes, I'm skeptical.
 

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Color me skeptical. I'd think the batteries and vehicle wiring would be the limiters. This looks like some sort of April Fool joke. What I CAN imagine is a bunch of wiring systems sizzling and a bunch of exciting battery explosions and fires. Yes, I'm skeptical.
Just like in ICE vehicles as well I suspect...batteries and wiring causing the brunt of the problems. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Color me skeptical. I'd think the batteries and vehicle wiring would be the limiters. This looks like some sort of April Fool joke. What I CAN imagine is a bunch of wiring systems sizzling and a bunch of exciting battery explosions and fires. Yes, I'm skeptical.
I'm leaving it at I don't understand why it is an issue. I get that high volumes of electric can melt a cable if it isn't the correct cable and I do understand that it is a tremendous amount of electric running through that "refilling hose" to recharge a battery in 5 minutes. I just didn't realize the solution needed breakthroughs to resolve.
 

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Color me skeptical. I'd think the batteries and vehicle wiring would be the limiters. This looks like some sort of April Fool joke. What I CAN imagine is a bunch of wiring systems sizzling and a bunch of exciting battery explosions and fires. Yes, I'm skeptical.
I was referring to where limiting factors could be, not where they are right now (because it would likely vary with the specific battery/connection/location).

With this new charging setup (if it ever becomes available), it sounds like an install would need an upgrade of everything, from the connection to the power grid, the cables between the grid and the charging station, the charging station, the cables in the vehicle and the battery.

Even now, the at-home Tesla charging station charge much slower than their Supercharger stations, at least partially because homes don't typically have the power connection to the grid needed for it (also for other reasons).
 

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It's the whole chain. The power connection to the location, then the cabling to the charger station, the connector to the vehicle, and then the wiring in the vehicle itself, and the battery. Any of them can be the limiting factor as to how much power can be transmitted at any given time.
Exactly: "A chain is only as strong as its weakest link"

What I don't fully understand, and maybe because I don't have the right background I won't, but I'd think electric delivery is something we've been doing for 100 years and there has got to be higher capacity wires/uses out there. Why is it a problem with charging batteries? Is it that a huge piece of equipment will have a number of electric lines going into it so they aren't bundled together and therefore avoid overheating? And does the need for it to be idiot proof for the public also add a layer of problems vs. that huge piece of equipment whose electric cables are probably tucked away where people won't be constantly touching them and moving them?
I'm sure the electrical feed(s) going to a commercial building are larger, and can handle more power, but an EV charger would be a "portable" delivery and as @davester stated, that is only one of the bottle-necks, the connector, wire going to the battery, as well as the connections and wires within the battery.
 

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't the car have to "let you" charge it that fast?
Doesn't higher pack voltage = better to take advantage of much more powerful future chargers?

If you charge at home it doesn't really matter.
A Level 2 charger will do the job.
 

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't the car have to "let you" charge it that fast?
Doesn't higher pack voltage = better to take advantage of much more powerful future chargers?

If you charge at home it doesn't really matter.
A Level 2 charger will do the job.
Correct, one of the rubs with EV's is re-charging vs. re-fueling, I can fill my truck in 5 minutes and go 450 miles.
- This isn't an answer for today, but for the future.
 
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I believe Tesla is testing / using liquid cooled charging cables on superchargers
I imagine the "issue" is more of keeping the cable light enough anybody can handle it VS absolute power delivery
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't the car have to "let you" charge it that fast?
Doesn't higher pack voltage = better to take advantage of much more powerful future chargers?

If you charge at home it doesn't really matter.
A Level 2 charger will do the job.
This cord is just one piece of the puzzle, apparently it isn't just the battery that is the limiting factor.
 

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Wow, Ford and Purdue really are way ahead. Most people wait until April first for April fool's day jokes.
 
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