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Now that cars are moving from larger naturally-aspirated engines to smaller forced-induction (turbo, supercharged) engines, will this have any impact on engine durability? FI obviously has much higher cylinder pressures. Won't this reduce reliability over the long haul?
 

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Forced induction engines have stronger pistons, connecting rods, crankshafts, and other internals. Supercharged 3800s routinely, easily last over 200k miles and turbo diesels in full size pickup trucks often go way longer than that
 

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The bigger thing that will happen is engines will gain weight. Look at desiel engines, their compression is still much greater than a gas with forced inductions, and those last a long time as well, they just weigh more.
 

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If the engine was properly designed to be supercharged/turbo'd it should last just fine. But if you took your stock motor and didn't upgrade anything and just went straight to the forced induction system you're going to encounter some problems sooner than later.
 

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Now that cars are moving from larger naturally-aspirated engines to smaller forced-induction (turbo, supercharged) engines, will this have any impact on engine durability? FI obviously has much higher cylinder pressures. Won't this reduce reliability over the long haul?
You bring up a legitimate point. As others have said the hard parts that never fail on a NA engine are usually upgraded and also do not typically fail in the FI model. However if you look at reliability ratings of two otherwise identical cars (GP GT vs GP GTP) you will see much higher maintenance costs with the FI car.

As the happy owner of many previous FI cars just take a look under the hood of a 5 year old turbo car and compare it to any NA car. The turbos put a tremendous amount of extra heat under the hood and there is no question it prematurely kills belts, hoses and other plastic bits.
 

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You bring up a legitimate point. As others have said the hard parts that never fail on a NA engine are usually upgraded and also do not typically fail in the FI model. However if you look at reliability ratings of two otherwise identical cars (GP GT vs GP GTP) you will see much higher maintenance costs with the FI car.

As the happy owner of many previous FI cars just take a look under the hood of a 5 year old turbo car and compare it to any NA car. The turbos put a tremendous amount of extra heat under the hood and there is no question it prematurely kills belts, hoses and other plastic bits.
I question :D I've owned several Saab 900 Turbos from the 1980's to early 90's. There is a lot of heat under the hood if you drive the car hard on a summer day, but I've had a lot of them that still had the original coolant hoses with "SAAB 07-10-87" or similar date codes on them and the hoses were in good shape (I never bothered to change them)

These cars get especially hot underhood because of how the exhaust is routed through the engine bay (log manifold goes forwards, turbo, then looonng downpipe)

I've had the regular models as well and can't say a reliability difference. I can say the regular cars tend to be in better shape, that may be because turbo is more desirable and thus "out of my price range" for a mint version.

The biggest issue is rust of the frame in the spot under the battery - I think the exhaust heat (turbo is next to it) makes the battery leak and rust the frame. But it happens to regular models too (admittedly all batteries leak some acid)



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