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A short article from Autosavant about the Nissan 1400 Bakkie derivative of the old Datsun 1200
http://www.autosavant.net/2008/03/retirement-time-for-champion-of-africa.html

Sniff!...

:sad:

November, 1971 — March, 2008

The "Workhorse of Africa" earned its tough-as-nails reputation. It was dirt cheap (at least in relation to other products on the SA market), sipped petrol, hauled every kind of cargo the continent could manage, and on the few occasions it broke down, could be repaired with baling wire and a plaster ("Band-Aid" to Americans).

It's hauled surfboards to J-bay, hogs to market in Umtata, and plied millions of miles of untarred roads at asthmatic altitudes. It played a significant role as the formerly disenfranchised, via "Black Empowerment", chose the Nissan "Champ" as a work vehicle when starting up the thousands of small businesses that have flourished since democracy took seat at the foot of Africa.

Those outside of South Africa may laugh at the notion of such a crude and outdated vehicle, but it served its purpose diligently and loyally.

So I shed a fond tear and bid a adieu to South Africa's "Plucky little bakkie" (that rhymes in SA English!)....
 

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Sniff!...

:sad:

November, 1971 — March, 2008

The "Workhorse of Africa" earned its tough-as-nails reputation. It was dirt cheap (at least in relation to other products on the SA market), sipped petrol, hauled every kind of cargo the continent could manage, and on the few occasions it broke down, could be repaired with baling wire and a plaster ("Band-Aid" to Americans).

It's hauled surfboards to J-bay, hogs to market in Umtata, and plied millions of miles of untarred roads at asthmatic altitudes. It played a significant role as the formerly disenfranchised, via "Black Empowerment", chose the Nissan "Champ" as a work vehicle when starting up the thousands of small businesses that have flourished since democracy took seat at the foot of Africa.

Those outside of South Africa may laugh at the notion of such a crude and outdated vehicle, but it served its purpose diligently and loyally.

So I shed a fond tear and bid a adieu to South Africa's "Plucky little bakkie" (that rhymes in SA English!)....
I'm glad you got a chance to read this, t-rex. When we posted it on the site the other day, I was thinking of our SA roots and meant to point out the article to you.:D
 

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I'm glad you got a chance to read this, t-rex. When we posted it on the site the other day, I was thinking of our SA roots and meant to point out the article to you.:D
Dankie!

And kudos to the writer for getting a particular thing right: origin of the word "bakkie". If I had a dollar for every time I read somewhere that it's derived from the English "back"...

"Bakkie" is Afrikaans for "Tea Tray".

:D
 

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This thing is a death trap. My mom used to own one, one day coming home, she saw an accident involving a member of parliament who was driving one. He was soo dead.
She put it on sale, never to drive it again. That was back in the 1980's. Their brakes are soo not there too..
 

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Dankie!

And kudos to the writer for getting a particular thing right: origin of the word "bakkie". If I had a dollar for every time I read somewhere that it's derived from the English "back"...

"Bakkie" is Afrikaans for "Tea Tray".

:D
Andy is a really intelligent guy and a great writer; the first thing he wrote for us was about a driving adventure he had in Cuba while on "holiday" there. I think he drove 2500 miles in a Cuban rental car.

http://www.autosavant.net/2007/08/road-trip-with-difference-cuban-style.html
 
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