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Other way around. The Borg told Picard that, "We will assimilate you, resistance is futile."

But then the Borg were NOT able to assimilate the human race, because resistance was NOT futile.

Anyways....
If the Borg really wanted to, they could. If they sent in 100 cubes, it would be easy. But they always send 1.
Anyhoo....

Worrying about battery prices going up, and crashing the EV industry, is kind of like when old Henry Ford was cranking out Model Ts, and everybody was sure that commodity prices were going to go up. That steel and gasoline would just become too expensive. That's why the auto industry disappeared, and we still rely on horses for transportation.

We don't? Nevermind.
We will find a way to sustainably manufacture the needed battery capacity as this segment of the auto industry ramps up. All we need is time.
 

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If the Borg really wanted to, they could. If they sent in 100 cubes, it would be easy. But they always send 1.
Anyhoo....



We will find a way to sustainably manufacture the needed battery capacity as this segment of the auto industry ramps up. All we need is time.
Or they could've just gone back in time whenever/where ever they felt like it again and stopped first contact. No reason for them to go back in time near the federation flagship that could just follow them through the temporal vortex and stop them.
 

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We will find a way to sustainably manufacture the needed battery capacity as this segment of the auto industry ramps up. All we need is time.
Time is necessary but not sufficient. Achieving that goal will require more government intervention in the automotive industry, and perhaps other industries as well such as chemicals.
 

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Time is necessary but not sufficient. Achieving that goal will require more government intervention in the automotive industry, and perhaps other industries as well such as chemicals.
We're running out of time?

Eh, I don't see much need for intervention. The EVs are already selling in increasing numbers. Becoming the "right choice" for more and more drivers.

If the government wishes to give EVs a "push", a few incentives here and there would be plenty, and they've already done that. Their "method" of incentives was not the best, but the incentives have done some pushing. Personally, I'd like to see such incentives phased out, allowing all the associated businesses to sink or swim on their own merit.
 

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We're running out of time?

Eh, I don't see much need for intervention. The EVs are already selling in increasing numbers. Becoming the "right choice" for more and more drivers.

If the government wishes to give EVs a "push", a few incentives here and there would be plenty, and they've already done that. Their "method" of incentives was not the best, but the incentives have done some pushing. Personally, I'd like to see such incentives phased out, allowing all the associated businesses to sink or swim on their own merit.
The only area where I think there needs to be some government direction is in regulating battery technology. Maybe mandating the exclusion of certain materials, mandating that all batteries be recycled, battery safety, how batteries are rated, charging commonality, etc. Some of this might already exist, I'm not sure.
 
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The only area where I think there needs to be some government direction is in regulating battery technology. Maybe mandating the exclusion of certain materials, mandating that all batteries be recycled, battery safety, how batteries are rated, charging commonality, etc. Some of this might already exist, I'm not sure.
Yeah..since most of of the global cobalt production is coming from Democratic Republic of the Congo and Zambia and they also use children there for mining maybe this problem should also be taking into consideration. Need for cobalt will grow with number of EV rising.

But i doubt people from other countries will care. It is not like people care now from where did the cobalt used in batteries in their laptop, mobile phone etc. came from.

As cobalt demand booms, companies must do more to protect Congolese miners
 

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We're running out of time?
Government officials who support mandates for battery electric vehicles apparently think so. ;)

Personally, I'd like to see such incentives phased out, allowing all the associated businesses to sink or swim on their own merit.
+1
That should be the public policy goal in the areas of electric vehicles, EV components including batteries, EV charging infrastructure, and related services and software.
 

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So all the companies that are going in on all electric, but what do people do that live in Apartments, live in there car's, live in urban areas that you can barley pare let alone find somewhere to plug in, all electric maybe a mistake.
 

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Time is necessary but not sufficient. Achieving that goal will require more government intervention in the automotive industry, and perhaps other industries as well such as chemicals.
But the problem is...we have too much gov't control and intervention in our lives as it is. That's my real beef with some of this all electric agenda.
 

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So all the companies that are going in on all electric, but what do people do that live in Apartments, live in there car's, live in urban areas that you can barley pare let alone find somewhere to plug in, all electric maybe a mistake.
Only if you assume all EV research and development comes to a dead stop. Yes, right now, inner city dwellers are less likely to make an EV their choice. But the technology of the cars, the batteries and the chargers has been, and still is, very likely to improve. EVs already can work for the majority of drivers. Some people in those high population density areas will need a place to charge, and charger availability is improving. If you can't charge where you park, you'll need to charge the same way you refuel an ICEV, at a gas (or recharge) station. Yes, more such stations would be needed, but as gas stations decline, they can be replaced by charge stations. And with a 200, 300 (or more) mile range, most city dwellers aren't going to need to charge very often.

And as always, we have time. Nobody has said it will happen immediately. Not today, not next month, not next year, not even next decade. But it is ramping up. And all the governments, the mega-companies, the small companies, and even the smaller entrepreneurs worldwide are vying to come up with the next big "thing", that will be profitable along with an EV world.
 

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But the problem is...we have too much gov't control and intervention in our lives as it is. That's my real beef with some of this all electric agenda.
That's not really just an EV issue. There is a great deal of government intrusion in the ICEV world. Taxes levied here, tax breaks doled out there, and regulations applied. We always need to improve the balance between what we really need, and what the government officials want.
 

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We always need to improve the balance between what we really need, and what the government officials want.
In the context of EV, what we really need is for those products to be sold on their own merits, not on mandates and subsidies for their production or restrictions and penalties on competing propulsion technologies.

What government officials want is total control over their subjects. Electric vehicles and associated infrastructure and services present a perfect opportunity for them to do just that, using the hoax of globaloney warming as a pretext.
 
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Discussion Starter #54
We will find a way to sustainably manufacture the needed battery capacity as this segment of the auto industry ramps up. All we need is time.
We can't handle a slight increase in semi-conductors, but yeah; "it'll just happen, no problem"................

Time is necessary but not sufficient. Achieving that goal will require more government intervention in the automotive industry, and perhaps other industries as well such as chemicals.
For every action there is "un-intended consequences" remember when they tried to make a small increase in ethanol fuel in the US, corn prices shot up, other crops were not planted, in lieu of corn being planted, which resulted in a shortage of soybeans (used in almost everything) feed for hogs and cattle and so one and so on.

We're running out of time?

Eh, I don't see much need for intervention. The EVs are already selling in increasing numbers. Becoming the "right choice" for more and more drivers.

If the government wishes to give EVs a "push", a few incentives here and there would be plenty, and they've already done that. Their "method" of incentives was not the best, but the incentives have done some pushing. Personally, I'd like to see such incentives phased out, allowing all the associated businesses to sink or swim on their own merit.
People that think we can go from 1-2% to 20% with no negative impacts are very naïve, much less 100% EV.

Government officials who support mandates for battery electric vehicles apparently think so. ;)

+1
That should be the public policy goal in the areas of electric vehicles, EV components including batteries, EV charging infrastructure, and related services and software.
The SAME people that were behind Solyndra are behind all this "stuff" people that have never actually ran a (successful) business.


But the problem is...we have too much gov't control and intervention in our lives as it is. That's my real beef with some of this all electric agenda.
Jennifer Granholm, former Michigan Governor is the Energy Secretary, she was asked, how are we going to build all these power plants and energy transmission lines? "No I don't like regulation" (that is not a legitimate solution, just an empty talking point) yet the Democrats are the ones that have unrealistic restrictions on the exact things they are proposing we do. (and this isn't an April Fools joke)
 

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For every action there is "un-intended consequences" remember when they tried to make a small increase in ethanol fuel in the US, corn prices shot up, other crops were not planted, in lieu of corn being planted, which resulted in a shortage of soybeans (used in almost everything) feed for hogs and cattle and so one and so on.
I remember that Ed753! General Motors was "all-in" with corn based ethanol and E85 fuel about 15 years ago. They even created a marketing campaign for corn based ethanol called "Live Green, Go Yellow".



One favorable consequence, if an unintended one, is that the public became more aware of the environmental and economic issues associated with corn based ethanol production. In the U.S. that eventually led to regulatory updates that completely phased out CAFE credits for E85 flex fuel vehicles in 2019.

Whaddya know, without that government subsidy, GM as of MY 2021 has only two E85 FFV vehicles available for sale: Chevy Silverado 1500 and GMC Sierra 1500 with the 5.3L DFM engine. And that engine is going away later this year!
 

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Discussion Starter #56
I remember that Ed753! General Motors was "all-in" with corn based ethanol and E85 fuel about 15 years ago. They even created a marketing campaign for corn based ethanol called "Live Green, Go Yellow".



One favorable consequence, if an unintended one, is that the public became more aware of the environmental and economic issues associated with corn based ethanol production. In the U.S. that eventually led to regulatory updates that completely phased out CAFE credits for E85 flex fuel vehicles in 2019.

Whaddya know, without that government subsidy, GM as of MY 2021 has only two E85 FFV vehicles available for sale: Chevy Silverado 1500 and GMC Sierra 1500 with the 5.3L DFM engine. And that engine is going away later this year!
But, there isn't any environmental issues with EV's right?

As long as the solar panels, windmills and transmission lines are in someone else's back yard, and the unicorn farts-pixie-dust are in my back yard, I'm cool with it!
 
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We can't handle a slight increase in semi-conductors, but yeah; "it'll just happen, no problem"................
The pandemic has disrupted the global supply chains left and right.
There's only one company that isn't disrupted by the lack of semi-conductors, and that's Toyota. Why? because their supply chain expertise far outstrip any company., They built up a process where their suppliers have to have a 2-6 month extra supply specifically for Toyota. Their supply chain was disrupted once before during the Fukushima disaster, and they fixed it.

A pandemic is a once in a generation event. (Hopefully.) But every company should understand their supply chain and have a business continuity plan. If you see gaps in your supply chain where lead times can be long, then you bolster it.
 

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Discussion Starter #58
The pandemic has disrupted the global supply chains left and right.
There's only one company that isn't disrupted by the lack of semi-conductors, and that's Toyota. Why? because their supply chain expertise far outstrip any company., They built up a process where their suppliers have to have a 2-6 month extra supply specifically for Toyota. Their supply chain was disrupted once before during the Fukushima disaster, and they fixed it.

A pandemic is a once in a generation event. (Hopefully.) But every company should understand their supply chain and have a business continuity plan. If you see gaps in your supply chain where lead times can be long, then you bolster it.
My comment was slightly tongue in cheek, but Toyota has had trouble too.

We have had supply chain issues for 2+ years, it's been a perpetual resourcing of components; search for viable suppliers, validation of products and purchase trying to catch-up, in-bound freight delays out-bound distribution and distribution. As we speak I am actually seeking approval from upper management to build more inventory, (where possible) as an increased buffer, to keep order-fill rates up.

Of course EV's aren't going to happen overnight, but I just thought your comment had a bit too much "matter of fact, no-worries, it'll just happen" attitude in it.
 

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My comment was slightly tongue in cheek, but Toyota has had trouble too.

We have had supply chain issues for 2+ years, it's been a perpetual resourcing of components; search for viable suppliers, validation of products and purchase trying to catch-up, in-bound freight delays out-bound distribution and distribution. As we speak I am actually seeking approval from upper management to build more inventory, (where possible) as an increased buffer, to keep order-fill rates up.

Of course EV's aren't going to happen overnight, but I just thought your comment had a bit too much "matter of fact, no-worries, it'll just happen" attitude in it.

Toyota's problems are minimal compared to the rest of the auto industry.

I never said EV's are going to happen overnight. We've got 15 years to get there.
IT will happen. And it's going to happen.
The foreseeable roadmap for every company out there is all EV. You don't halt that.
 

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So all the companies that are going in on all electric, but what do people do that live in Apartments, live in there car's, live in urban areas that you can barley pare let alone find somewhere to plug in, all electric maybe a mistake.


Hope EV automakers dont take any short cuts or cut corners to reduces costs because of the high cost of the battery materials as the pressure to increase the range of an EV mounts.

I think the one of the biggest problem might be facing EV's once they go mainstream get mass produced in the millions as the batteries range gets extended more and more, might be a massive takata type airbag type thermal runaway tinderbox EV recall problem in tinderbox type places like California.

l hope GM's thermal runaway monitoring system is bomb proof given top priority in the design of all it's EV cars, and nothing bad ever happens to model thats starts to sell in the millions once EV's take off in 10-15 year time, and suddenly they had to replace millions of battery packs. This would be a very very expensive recall you just hear about thermal runaway stories like this in this LINK.. it makes you worry a bit an EV car that losing billions sold at a huge loss, suddenly gets caught multi billion recall legal battle in 10-15 years these things do happen as EV go mainstream what a costly nightmare a big thermal runaway problem would be, hope GM's develops thermal runaway monitoring system thats the best in the business .

Just imagine having Ford Pinto type EV thermal runaway problem on your books once EV gets past 10 years old batteries might show up in a bit more in crashes as well, thermal runaway it seems to have been well hushed up at the moment.

Simple things sometimes catch you out, l certainly would not leave an EV parked inside my garage where charging points are an easier installation, than the locations you have mentioned, would hate to see my house burned to the ground with thermal runaway.
 
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