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DETROIT -- Dodge will sell a compact SUV in two years built on the same platform as the Jeep Liberty.

Until now, the Chrysler group has not shared Jeep platforms.

The Dodge will have a different body style, says Nick Vuich, chairman of the Jeep unit of UAW Local 12 in Toledo, Ohio. "It will incorporate the look of a Dodge," Vuich says.

The company declined comment. But a company insider who didn't want to be named says the SUV will be shown at the Chicago Auto Show next February and go on sale in fall 2006.

"This is not a badge-engineered Jeep," the insider says. "These are two very different, very separate vehicles."

The Dodge is among four updated products the Chrysler group will build in its expanded Jeep assembly plant in Toledo, union officials say. Production of a redesigned Jeep Wrangler begins in May 2006.

Assembly of the Dodge SUV begins in August 2006. A re-engineered Jeep Liberty comes in the summer of 2007, and a Wrangler derivative follows in 2007 or 2008, Vuich says.


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As long as "These are two very different, very separate vehicles"
is true, I don't see this as a bad thing.

Dodge DID used to have a little SUV:
(Even if it was a Mitsubishi)

 

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Originally posted by gmwsag@May 31 2004, 02:28 PM
Platform sharing.... :angry:
Badge engineering.... :angry: :angry:
It really cracks me up that someone on a GM board will smirk at platform sharing when it has been done for most of the history of the automobile regardless of manufacterer. Look back into the 50's, GM produced full sized cars that shared platforms and greenhouses between divisions yet managed to have styling and performance different enough between brands. GM is still a master of platform engineering...

GM was also the first manufacturers that I noticed when I was young that did blatant badge engineering with the 1975 Chevy Monza, Oldsmobile Starfire and Buick Skyhawk. I had to look hard to find the differences bewteen the cars which was only front bumper fascia changes to make the grilles look division brand different.

There is nothing wrong with platform sharing as long as cosmetically and dynamically you can create distinct vehicles that are good.
 

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Originally posted by gmwsag@May 31 2004, 02:28 PM
Platform sharing.... :angry:
Badge engineering.... :angry: :angry:
platform sharing=good
badge engineering=bad

Platform sharing can lead to very high quality products, look at all the epsilon vehicles...and the VUE/Equinox. Very well developed products. the money saved on developing new platforms goes into upgrading and differentiating the different versions. The problem arises when platform sharing goes too far and the vehicles are virtual clones. I personally really like platform sharing...if you haven't noticed
 

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Originally posted by Rex Raider@Jun 1 2004, 11:18 PM
If Chrysler perfected it, then where is Plymouth today?
Exactly, but then again, where is Chrysler Corporation today?
 

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Even though GM always messes it up.


High profit margins on vehicles like the Escalade are proof that GM gets it right more than wrong.

There have only been a few times that GM has shared a platform with every car division. The X body cars of the 1970's orginally were only Novas when they were introduced in 1968, then Pontiac got it's version, the Ventura in 1971, and Oldsmobile and Buick joined in with the Omega in 1973 and the Apollo in 1974. The X body underwent an extensive re-design in 1975 and Cadillac got a much modified version of the X body, powered by a Fuel Injected Oldsmobile 350 V8, and called it the Seville. The Seville was a highly successful car which stole many sales from Mercedes-Benz and BMW owners in the late 1970's, as usual, when GM is successful, other will follow, Ford dressed up a Granda, and called it a Versailles, its was a dud, Chrysler dressed up its Volare/Aspen twins, which were already almost identical badge engineered clones, and called them LeBaron and Diplomat.

The other time was the J body, and yeah...the Cimmaron was a bad idea.

But Chrysler and Ford are way more guilty of making clones than GM


The Valiant and Dart were almost identical since their introduction in the early 1960's and as time wore on, they became exact clones with different nameplates, can anyone tell the difference between a 1970 Dodge Dart or a Plymouth Valiant?
or a Fury and a Monaco from the late 1960's or 70's? A Belvedere or a Satellite? Or a Diplomat, Fifth Avenue and Grand Fury from the 1980's? An Omni or a Horizon?

Same with Ford.. A Maverick or a Comet? or even a Falcon or a Comet from the 1960's? A Granada or a Monarch from the 1970's? A Thunderbir or a Cougar in the 1970's? Ford used platform sharing to create the original 1967 Mercury Cougar. A Pinto or a Bobcat? Any full-size Ford or Mercury made after 1970?

Heck sometimes its tuff to tell a Grand Marquis from a Crown Victoria,or a Taurus from a Sable, or a Mountaneer from an Explorer.

I can always tell a Bonneville from a LeSabre and a Malibu from a G6 and an Impalla from Grand Prix or a Regal, or a DeVille from a Park Avenue.

Even with the GMT360's GM has taken the time and effort distinguish the Trailblazer from an Envoy or Rainer. Other manufacturers like Nissan, just add a grille to vehicles like the Armada to make them a QX45, sometimes they dont even make any visual changes at all, like a Land Cruiser and an LX470.
 

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Originally posted by MCGARRETT@Jun 2 2004, 08:46 AM
Even though GM always messes it up.


High profit margins on vehicles like the Escalade are proof that GM gets it right more than wrong.

There have only been a few times that GM has shared a platform with every car division. The X body cars of the 1970's orginally were only Novas when they were introduced in 1968, then Pontiac got it's version, the Ventura in 1971, and Oldsmobile and Buick joined in with the Omega in 1973 and the Apollo in 1974. The X body underwent an extensive re-design in 1975 and Cadillac got a much modified version of the X body, powered by a Fuel Injected Oldsmobile 350 V8, and called it the Seville. The Seville was a highly successful car which stole many sales from Mercedes-Benz and BMW owners in the late 1970's, as usual, when GM is successful, other will follow, Ford dressed up a Granda, and called it a Versailles, its was a dud, Chrysler dressed up its Volare/Aspen twins, which were already almost identical badge engineered clones, and called them LeBaron and Diplomat.

The other time was the J body, and yeah...the Cimmaron was a bad idea.

But Chrysler and Ford are way more guilty of making clones than GM


The Valiant and Dart were almost identical since their introduction in the early 1960's and as time wore on, they became exact clones with different nameplates, can anyone tell the difference between a 1970 Dodge Dart or a Plymouth Valiant?
or a Fury and a Monaco from the late 1960's or 70's? A Belvedere or a Satellite? Or a Diplomat, Fifth Avenue and Grand Fury from the 1980's? An Omni or a Horizon?

Same with Ford.. A Maverick or a Comet? or even a Falcon or a Comet from the 1960's? A Granada or a Monarch from the 1970's? A Thunderbir or a Cougar in the 1970's? Ford used platform sharing to create the original 1967 Mercury Cougar. A Pinto or a Bobcat? Any full-size Ford or Mercury made after 1970?

Heck sometimes its tuff to tell a Grand Marquis from a Crown Victoria,or a Taurus from a Sable, or a Mountaneer from an Explorer.

I can always tell a Bonneville from a LeSabre and a Malibu from a G6 and an Impalla from Grand Prix or a Regal, or a DeVille from a Park Avenue.

Even with the GMT360's GM has taken the time and effort distinguish the Trailblazer from an Envoy or Rainer. Other manufacturers like Nissan, just add a grille to vehicles like the Armada to make them a QX45, sometimes they dont even make any visual changes at all, like a Land Cruiser and an LX470.
Excellent points, McGarrett. I just don't understand what possesses people to make blanket statements like that without really looking at the situation.
 

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how many versions of the Trailblazer are there ? Chevy, Buick, Caddy, Saab, Isuzu....how many versions of the Venture ?...GM is no different than Ford or Daimler/Chrysler, if they have a good thing, they run it into the ground. The Japanese are certainly learning from the "Big Three", don't you think ? I think they will have the same problems as the US automakers if they resort to the same *tricks*.
 

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Originally posted by Hudson@Jun 3 2004, 03:25 AM
there's no Cadillac GMT360/GMT370.
No Cadillac version.......yet

Aren't we forgetting about the mother of all GM badge engineering faux pas? I give you the 80s versions of the Regal, Monte Carlo, Cutlass, and Grand Prix. When the redesign took place in 88, GM made a big deal about how the "GM cousins" won't look the same anymore. I think they learned a little from that mistake.

Speaking of the Cutlass and the 80s, I remember reading a story that the Cutlass was Americas most admired car for the average person. Then, during the next model year, all of Olds' car names began with the word Cutlass. Cutlass Supreme, Cutlass Ciera, Cutlass Calais, etc. PURPLEIMPALA is right. When they (GM, Ford, & Chrymler) realize they have a good thing going they beat it to death.
 
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