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I never use bad words until they do. Honestly I wish there were zero restrictions on that sort of thing. But we know there are. People react to me because I am not a sheep that thinks like other people. If that's the reason then I take that as a compliment. I speak my mind the way I see it.

You think writing software is impossible, that's probably true. But (as I mentioned earlier) explain how the companies have secured their most sensitive secrets? KFC, Coke, Pepsi those are a few.

So it can be done, those companies go the extra mile to make sure nobody gets that information.
I think you place to much stock on the Pepsi/Coke/KFC secret recipes. Most likely the original recipes are written on a piece of paper, stored in a vault - they are not online in a formal way. I bet, if anyone cared, they could figure out the secret recipes by breaking into their payable systems to see what raw ingredients they are buying. However, no one cares - it isn't worth the effort or risk to go to jail. Any decent chef can create something so similar to KFC's recipe as to be indistinguishable. Same with chemists, I'm sure with a little time they can create something that tastes just like Coke or Pepsi on their own (and I've tasted a SoBe product that tasted exactly like Dr. Pepper). KFC/Pepsi/Coke are substantially different than a stealth bomber - a vastly complicated with super advanced science behind them - and whose blueprints have to be stored on a computer for practical purposes. Iran, Russia, China and other countries will kill to get their hands on America's most secret and advanced tech. No one cares about KFC's recipe, grandma can make something similar in her kitchen. Coke/Pepsi's magic isn't the soda itself, it is their huge distribution systems.

You do use "bad" words or insulting/inflammatory words on your own. Post #71 in this thread you said "I think on a higher level then you do.", I hadn't said anything insulting to you as far as I can tell, but you, for all intents, said I'm not smart enough to understand you. Inflammatory. And not only were you calling yourself smarter than I, your grammar was incorrect, undermining yourself - and you've done both many times. You don't present yourself well and you invite attacks upon yourself. As I said before, you literally leave the front door open and invite attacks on GMI. As you said above, you've only yourself to blame for that.
 

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If the public doesn't purchase these knock offs would they continue to produce the knock off designs? Or would they decide to make their own designs?

Actually your stand on this is idiotic.
This goes on for the same very reason the King Of Cheap big box stores exist. There are always a segment of the population that is/are looking for a "more bang for their buck" sort of thing and that is the way they do it, with cheap crap (💩) .
 

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I think you place to much stock on the Pepsi/Coke/KFC secret recipes. Most likely the original recipes are written on a piece of paper, stored in a vault - they are not online. I bet, if anyone cared, they could figure out the secret recipes by breaking into their payable systems to see what raw ingredients they are buying. However, no one cares - it isn't worth the effort or risk to go to jail. Any decent chef can create something so similar to KFC's recipe as to be indistinguishable. Same with chemists, I'm sure with a little time they can create something that tastes just like Coke or Pepsi on their own (and I've tasted a SoBe product that tasted exactly like Dr. Pepper). KFC/Pepsi/Coke are substantially different than a stealth bomber - a vastly complicated with super advanced science behind them - and whose blueprints have to be stored on a computer for practical purposes. Iran, Russia, China and other countries will kill to get their hands on America's most secret and advanced tech. No one cares about KFC's recipe, grandma can make something similar in her kitchen.

You do use "bad" words or insulting/inflammatory words on your own. Post #71 in this thread you said "I think on a higher level then you do.", I hadn't said anything insulting to you as far as I can tell, but you, for all intents, said I'm not smart enough to understand you. Inflammatory. And not only were you calling yourself smarter than I, your grammar was incorrect, undermining yourself - and you've done both many times. You don't present yourself well and you invite attacks upon yourself. As I said before, you literally leave the front door open and invite attacks on GMI. As you said above, you've only yourself to blame for that.
That bothers you? I think on a higher level. Explain to me where the bad words are?

So what I get from you and the rest of the people here is that if you want to be liked on here. (Which I don't)

You should agree with people's post, complain about GM, start off making friends before making comments about this many topics and follow the heard so you can make as many friends as possible.

Well that's not me, that's not my personality, I don't go to websites to make friends. I go there to find information about GM and give my opinion about them.

These are my actual thoughts and if you don't agree then that's fine. You have a right to your opinion. When I disagree with other people I don't insist that those people should go elsewhere. The way you deal with people like me is try to make me go away. That's a childish, uneducated way to handle it.

As for the way I put my words together, look I don't view this site as a formal editorial. It's informal at best, I am just getting ideas on the site. If people can't understand that then they need to get over themselves. As you can see I don't care about being corrected on this site because it's not important.

Have a nice day.
 

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That bothers you? I think on a higher level. Explain to me where the bad words are?

So what I get from you and the rest of the people here is that if you want to be liked on here. (Which I don't)

You should agree with people's post, complain about GM, start off making friends before making comments about this many topics and follow the heard so you can make as many friends as possible.

Well that's not me, that's not my personality, I don't go to websites to make friends. I go there to find information about GM and give my opinion about them.

These are my actual thoughts and if you don't agree then that's fine. You have a right to your opinion. When I disagree with other people I don't insist that those people should go elsewhere. The way you deal with people like me is try to make me go away. That's a childish, uneducated way to handle it.

As for the way I put my words together, look I don't view this site as a formal editorial. It's informal at best, I am just getting ideas on the site. If people can't understand that then they need to get over themselves. As you can see I don't care about being corrected on this site because it's not important.

Have a nice day.
What bothers me is your posts don't back up your copious bluster. Do you think Einstein had to run around telling everyone he's brilliant? He didn't, his work spoke of his brilliance. Your attitude is grating, smug and self serving when you say your points are so mind bogglingly brilliant that none of us idiots can understand you. The problem is, most of your points don't hold water and you'll fight tooth and nail that they do hold water, finally relying on your "I'm so smart none of you can understand me". You say how brilliant you are, yet you don't even understand why GMI has a "competition news" section and you try to jam it down our throats as to the way GMI should be.

You don't have to be friends with anyone on GMI, but you certainly should treat people with respect. Just as with anything else you do. However, you do not treat people with respect. GMI has been around long before you joined and you expect everyone to bend to you will of how we should act and what we should say. Yes, people do not treat you well on GMI, I sometimes feel bad. But then I see what you've written and understand why you get attacked.

Yes, GMI is informal. I make grammatical mistakes and sometimes do not get my point out clearly. But again, I don't go around claiming my exceptional brilliance. If you are going to say that you shouldn't make spelling/grammatical mistakes while doing it, you undermine yourself.

Not to be mean, but you come across as someone who does not know how to interact with people. Tone it down a little, read other peoples posts and see how they go back and forth with each other. There are many disagreements on GMI - in my 13 or so years I've never seen someone on GMI who gets as universal of a negative reaction as you receive.
 

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What bothers me is your posts don't back up your copious bluster. Do you think Einstein had to run around telling everyone he's brilliant? He didn't, his work spoke of his brilliance. Your attitude is grating, smug and self serving when you say your points are so mind bogglingly brilliant that none of us idiots can understand you. The problem is, most of your points don't hold water and you'll fight tooth and nail that they do hold water, finally relying on your "I'm so smart none of you can understand me". You say how brilliant you are, yet you don't even understand why GMI has a "competition news" section and you try to jam it down our throats as to the way GMI should be.

You don't have to be friends with anyone on GMI, but you certainly should treat people with respect. Just as with anything else you do. However, you do not treat people with respect. GMI has been around long before you joined and you expect everyone to bend to you will of how we should act and what we should say. Yes, people do not treat you well on GMI, I sometimes feel bad. But then I see what you've written and understand why you get attacked.

Yes, GMI is informal. I make grammatical mistakes and sometimes do not get my point out clearly. But again, I don't go around claiming my exceptional brilliance. If you are going to say that you shouldn't make spelling/grammatical mistakes while doing it, you undermine yourself.

Not to be mean, but you come across as someone who does not know how to interact with people. Tone it down a little, read other peoples posts and see how they go back and forth with each other. There are many disagreements on GMI - in my 13 or so years I've never seen someone on GMI who gets as universal of a negative reaction as you receive.
Point taken and I respect your point of view.
 

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Tom Stacey, Anglia Ruskin University
September 10, 2021 1.55pm BST


Europeans and other western nations have dominated automotive excellence for over a century. Whether it is the satisfying thud of the door closing on a Volkswagen from Wolfsburg, or the beauty of a Ferrari from Modena, these brands are iconic – and very lucrative for their manufacturers. When we think of reliability, the Germans, and latterly the Japanese, have had it sewn up. But if you rest on your laurels, an upstart will soon be chasing at your heels.

The Chinese are not exactly upstarts in the traditional sense: it’s more than a decade since they surpassed America to become the most prolific car-makers in the world. But despite reaching that milestone in 2008, China’s cars were still mostly clones of cheap western vehicles.

Now, however, China is arguably producing the best cars in the world, and on track to dominate auto manufacturing. How did this happen, and will the west be able to regain its crown?

Advantage, Beijing
The centre of excellence in car manufacturing moved from Europe at the turn of the 1900s to the US with the growth of Detroit as the world’s auto powerhouse. The 1980s and 1990s saw Japan and South Korea surge ahead, only for Europe to rise again in the early noughties as Volkswagen duelled Toyota to be number-one manufacturer by output.

Each continent has added its own flavour along the way, from innovation in safety in Europe to volume production in the US to lean manufacturing in Japan. It was Toyota’s manufacturing systems that saved German-owned Porsche when it was facing dire business conditions in the 1990s, for instance.

China has gradually built its auto-making capabilities during these different eras. It originally began making Soviet-designed utility vehicles under licence in the 1950s, before its state-owned companies reached similar arrangements in joint ventures with western manufacturers like General Motors and Volkswagen in the 1980s. This produced cars that were far better designed and more sophisticated, and soon China’s roads were becoming choked with western clones.

A traffic jam in Beijing
The Beijing rush. Sueddeutsche Zeitung Photo/Alamy
But if that steadily elevated China to number-one world carmaker by output, it can now go one better. The goal for any automotive nation is to produce vehicles of outstanding quality at the lowest possible price, simultaneously delighting the owner with innovative features and good design.

Vehicle quality is both about simple reliability and also what we would describe as build quality: how well the vehicle is finished, the uniformity of the paint finish, how well the different panels on the body align, and even – as Volkswagen made famous – the sound the doors make when they close.

Japanese and Korean vehicles have dominated reliability, while build quality has been the preserve of the Germans for mass-manufactured cars, and British names like Rolls-Royce and Bentley at the luxury end (ironically both are owned by the Germans).

China is now a major threat on both fronts, having had the advantage of maturing most recently: as each new nation learns to produce vehicles at scale, they benefit from all the learning and technical developments that have gone before. Incumbent nations would have to start from the ground up to unlock these benefits, which is an enormous upheaval and expense. Many US car plants were built in the 1950s or even before, for instance.

China is also well placed to build cars for the right price. It still pays relatively low wages and has millions of skilled workers steeped in the nation’s strong manufacturing culture. Skilled workers are vital to reducing automotive costs because they make vehicles that need fewer adjustments or rebuilds.

Cars on the production line at the Tesla gigafactory in Shanghai
The Tesla gigafactory in Shanghai: five down, 1,995 to go. Xinhua/Alamy
China also has excellent shipping links, with many auto factories close to Shanghai, the world’s largest shipping port. This includes Tesla’s gigafactory, one of the largest facilities in the world, capable of producing around 2,000 cars daily. Getting the product out, shipped and with the customer quickly reduces costs because manufacturers get paid sooner. Also crucially important is China’s huge components supply-chain, which is already a large exporter of car parts to other nations. This all adds up to huge economies of scale that don’t exist anywhere else, and are difficult to replicate.

Changing of the guard
Admittedly, some Chinese vehicles in the past decade have not had the design or performance expected by western buyers, so have not sold in enough volumes in Europe to worry the establishment. Yet this is changing rapidly. Start-ups like Polestar (owned by Volvo) are building vehicles that combine excellent build quality and the safety features, design and performance that western buyers demand. Sales of the Polestar 2 electric SUV have actually outpaced the Tesla Model 3 in Sweden and Norway at times, albeit the Model 3 is still the bigger seller overall.

Comparing vehicles that are built both in the west and China is particularly illuminating. Tesla’s Model 3 and Model Y cars are both built in the US and China, and owners in Europe have reported that the Chinese versions are better. I hear that their all-important panel gaps are tighter, and fewer trips to the repair shop are required.

Polestar and Tesla both have very modern factories and are fully electric. Both are designed in the west, as is BMW’s iX3, another fully electric SUV built in China for export back to Europe. Like Polestar and Tesla, the iX3 is taking advantage of China’s supply chain in EV batteries, among other things.

The Nio eT electric sedan being unveiled in Shanghai.
The Nio eT electric sedan being unveiled in Shanghai. Xinhua/Alamy
Yet Chinese-designed and built vehicles are not far behind in their design (if not equal), and starting to invade European markets. Xpeng is one Chinese start-up that only produces electric vehicles. Having sold well in China, it is making its first moves into Europe via Norwaywith its G3 model. Reviews of this compact SUV by the established auto press have been good. Meanwhile, Nio is another Chinese manufacturer making great strides in becoming a global name in pure electric vehicles.

It is early days for these entirely Chinese-designed cars to take on the establishment, and there is always the possibility that geopolitics upsets progress, but it finally seems that all the ingredients are there. The next revolution in automotive is replacing petrol and diesel vehicles with electric. With all of China’s advantages, it could yet lead this shift, and finally become the home of the best cars in the world.

Source:
I'd like to know what this writer has been drinking. I've never owned anything from China that was quality, or not copied from the West in particular the USA. And, If this were to happen, I quess the rest of the world just sit back and let it happen? Only and idiot would write something like this!!!
 
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