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Cars.com
January 7, 2021

While January incentives typically take a breather following aggressive year-end sales, Chevy has actually brought back crazy 84-month APR deals plus up to $7,000 in rebates to start off the year.

Yesterday, dealer incentive bulletins reveal that Chevy began offering 0% APR plus down payment assistance across much of its lineup. The 2020 Bolt EV offers the most extreme deal at 0% APR for 84 months plus $7,000 in cash. While rebates usually aren't stackable with low APR, the offer is a combo deal when financing.

A variety of 2020 Chevys combine 84-month interest-free financing plus cash. Among the models still available at dealers, the most noteworthy examples include the Trax ($2,300 bonus), Equinox ($4,150 bonus), and Traverse ($1,350).
Source Below: Chevy.com

2020 CHEVROLET Bolt EV
For Well-Qualified Buyers
0% APR for 84 months
Plus
$7,000 For Very Well Qualified Buyers When Financed w/ GM Financial










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So, you add a generous dealer discount, $7,000 cash back, $3000 GM Card bonus, $2000 New York State EV credit and in my case $3,100 in GM Card points and you have $ 15,100 in cash. Dealer discount at say $2500 and then 84 months of zero percent financing. $17,600 + finance savings of about $2500. That's TWENTY THOUSAND DOLLARS.

Really, why not just give them away and be done with it?

Perhaps GM could do the right thing and cut the list price by $10,000. That would be the REAL savings as consumers would not have to pay sales tax on the inflated list and ridiculous incentive offers. Hate to say it, but follow Tesla's example and price your vehicles for market acceptance, not entry to the incentive circus.









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So, you add a generous dealer discount, $7,000 cash back, $3000 GM Card bonus, $2000 New York State EV credit and in my case $3,100 in GM Card points and you have $ 15,100 in cash. Dealer discount at say $2500 and then 84 months of zero percent financing. $17,600 + finance savings of about $2500. That's TWENTY THOUSAND DOLLARS.

Really, why not just give them away and be done with it?

Perhaps GM could do the right thing and cut the list price by $10,000. That would be the REAL savings as consumers would not have to pay sales tax on the inflated list and ridiculous incentive offers. Hate to say it, but follow Tesla's example and price your vehicles for market acceptance, not entry to the incentive circus.









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That last part is key. IMO make the product good enough and desirable enough that the "incentive circus" is not needed to move the product.
 

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Most card holders can only use $1k toward the Bolt + the $3k bonus.

Is this offer nationwide? Typically CARB states have the best Bolt rebates and those are the same states that often add an additional state rebate.
 

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That last part is key. IMO make the product good enough and desirable enough that the "incentive circus" is not needed to move the product.
Because GM is probably losing money on them with the incentives. The only reason they still might be ok in the grand scheme of things for GM is the ZEV's they generate. Remember Tesla STILL does not make money selling cars. They make money selling ZEV's. Look it up on the finance statements.And I saw another article why Toyota may not be embracing BEV's. https://finance.yahoo.com/news/japan-power-prices-extend-rally-024736639.html At a buck a KWH is a BEV cheaper to run or an ICE?
 

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...

Perhaps GM could do the right thing and cut the list price by $10,000. That would be the REAL savings as consumers would not have to pay sales tax on the inflated list and ridiculous incentive offers. Hate to say it, but follow Tesla's example and price your vehicles for market acceptance, not entry to the incentive circus..
My guess is when the Bolt EUV comes out they'll announce a price cut on the regular Bolt. Just a guess. Haven't battery costs come down since the Bolt first came out?
 

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At a buck a KWH is a BEV cheaper to run or an ICE?
Not quite a buck per KWH, but let's do some math.

My home November utility bill charged $ 0.264 per KWH including all taxes and fees.

The 2020 Chevy Bolt has a range of 259 miles from the alloted 66 kilowatt-hours of usable battery capacity. Thus, at my home, it costs $ 17.43 to "fill up" the Bolt.

That's an energy charge of $ 0.0673 per mile.

The 2020 Chevy Malibu LT is rated at 32 miles per gallon (combined City/Highway) by the EPA. Regular gas is currently $ 2.299 at my local station.

That's an energy charge of $ 0.0697 per mile.

With current incentives, each of these vehicles costs about the same, and have about the same maintenance costs. To those who will disagree with my maintenance statement - yes, you have lower mechanical costs, but the much heavier EV usually has considerably higher tire replacement costs.




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These are 2020’s, it must make sense for them , perhaps for EV credits? Mother Barrah doesn’t like to lose money on car sales
 

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Not quite a buck per KWH, but let's do some math.

My home November utility bill charged $ 0.264 per KWH including all taxes and fees.

The 2020 Chevy Bolt has a range of 259 miles from the alloted 66 kilowatt-hours of usable battery capacity. Thus, at my home, it costs $ 17.43 to "fill up" the Bolt.

That's an energy charge of $ 0.0673 per mile.

The 2020 Chevy Malibu LT is rated at 32 miles per gallon (combined City/Highway) by the EPA. Regular gas is currently $ 2.299 at my local station.

That's an energy charge of $ 0.0697 per mile.

With current incentives, each of these vehicles costs about the same, and have about the same maintenance costs. To those who will disagree with my maintenance statement - yes, you have lower mechanical costs, but the much heavier EV usually has considerably higher tire replacement costs.

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Charging Efficiency is around 70-80%. 66 KW/Hs takes 90 some AC-DC/KW/Hs, @ $23.76 (approx.) or closer to $0.09 per mile.
 

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That last part is key. IMO make the product good enough and desirable enough that the "incentive circus" is not needed to move the product.
Good enough and desirable enough. Desirable can be related to PR campaigns, and as we know GM is gravely disabled in that department.

America's Love for EV's :rolleyes:

I keep saying, "We aren't Ready Yet" neither is the Technology.

Tesla, at least has a "Cool Factor". The Bolt, is just a Chevy.
Yup.
Uh huh. We will generate lektrik from rainbows and unicorns, I hear that tech is just around the corner.

Indeed. No Cool Factor. Snobs don't buy Bolts. Snobs buy Teslas and Mercedes and Bimmahs.

Because GM is probably losing money on them with the incentives. The only reason they still might be ok in the grand scheme of things for GM is the ZEV's they generate. Remember Tesla STILL does not make money selling cars. They make money selling ZEV's. Look it up on the finance statements.And I saw another article why Toyota may not be embracing BEV's. https://finance.yahoo.com/news/japan-power-prices-extend-rally-024736639.html At a buck a KWH is a BEV cheaper to run or an ICE?
Interesting. From the piece:
cold blast sweeping across North Asia along with dwindling liquefied natural gas stockpiles has resulted in a power supply crunch across the region.

The 24-hour average spot electricity price for next-day delivery jumped 11% to 99.9 yen ($0.97) per kilowatt-hour on Thursday, according to the Japan Electric Power Exchange. That’s the highest level since trading started in 2005.

Limited supplies and higher energy costs may have a greater economic toll if colder temperatures extend through January,


Not quite a buck per KWH, but let's do some math.

My home November utility bill charged $ 0.264 per KWH including all taxes and fees.

The 2020 Chevy Bolt has a range of 259 miles from the alloted 66 kilowatt-hours of usable battery capacity. Thus, at my home, it costs $ 17.43 to "fill up" the Bolt.

That's an energy charge of $ 0.0673 per mile.

The 2020 Chevy Malibu LT is rated at 32 miles per gallon (combined City/Highway) by the EPA. Regular gas is currently $ 2.299 at my local station.

That's an energy charge of $ 0.0697 per mile.

With current incentives, each of these vehicles costs about the same, and have about the same maintenance costs. To those who will disagree with my maintenance statement - yes, you have lower mechanical costs, but the much heavier EV usually has considerably higher tire replacement costs.
And throw in an extended cold spell and the dreaded RA (Range Anxiety) and grid strain...wait, we have green energy from Unicorns and Leprechauns. Or was it rainbows? Doesn't matter, it's coming soon, very soon, to a neighborhood just like yours.
 

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Not quite a buck per KWH, but let's do some math.

My home November utility bill charged $ 0.264 per KWH including all taxes and fees.

The 2020 Chevy Bolt has a range of 259 miles from the alloted 66 kilowatt-hours of usable battery capacity. Thus, at my home, it costs $ 17.43 to "fill up" the Bolt.

That's an energy charge of $ 0.0673 per mile.

The 2020 Chevy Malibu LT is rated at 32 miles per gallon (combined City/Highway) by the EPA. Regular gas is currently $ 2.299 at my local station.

That's an energy charge of $ 0.0697 per mile.

With current incentives, each of these vehicles costs about the same, and have about the same maintenance costs. To those who will disagree with my maintenance statement - yes, you have lower mechanical costs, but the much heavier EV usually has considerably higher tire replacement costs.




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Interesting, what is the gas tax for your state. TX regular is under a 2 bucks. When I calculate cost compared to EV's I always take out gas tax, because EV's do not pay road taxes. I think a couple of states have started charging a road tax at re-registration based on miles though.
 

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Not quite a buck per KWH, but let's do some math.

My home November utility bill charged $ 0.264 per KWH including all taxes and fees.

The 2020 Chevy Bolt has a range of 259 miles from the alloted 66 kilowatt-hours of usable battery capacity. Thus, at my home, it costs $ 17.43 to "fill up" the Bolt.

That's an energy charge of $ 0.0673 per mile.

The 2020 Chevy Malibu LT is rated at 32 miles per gallon (combined City/Highway) by the EPA. Regular gas is currently $ 2.299 at my local station.

That's an energy charge of $ 0.0697 per mile.

With current incentives, each of these vehicles costs about the same, and have about the same maintenance costs. To those who will disagree with my maintenance statement - yes, you have lower mechanical costs, but the much heavier EV usually has considerably higher tire replacement costs.




.








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Charging Efficiency is around 70-80%. 66 KW/Hs takes 90 some AC-DC/KW/Hs, @ $23.76 (approx.) or closer to $0.09 per mile.
My Volt experience proved what InCogKneeToe states. Even at full charge(while still plugged in) the car will use house power to optimize the battery temp, both heat and cooling and does not charge at 100% ratio. I didn't use mine much in the summer(use the hotrods) so I left it fully charged but unplugged.
 

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Not quite a buck per KWH, but let's do some math.

My home November utility bill charged $ 0.264 per KWH including all taxes and fees.

The 2020 Chevy Bolt has a range of 259 miles from the alloted 66 kilowatt-hours of usable battery capacity. Thus, at my home, it costs $ 17.43 to "fill up" the Bolt.

That's an energy charge of $ 0.0673 per mile.

The 2020 Chevy Malibu LT is rated at 32 miles per gallon (combined City/Highway) by the EPA. Regular gas is currently $ 2.299 at my local station.

That's an energy charge of $ 0.0697 per mile.

With current incentives, each of these vehicles costs about the same, and have about the same maintenance costs. To those who will disagree with my maintenance statement - yes, you have lower mechanical costs, but the much heavier EV usually has considerably higher tire replacement costs.
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Are you sure you've got the right electricity cost? Here on Looooooooong Island, my bill says $.103 per KWh. That works out to $6.80 for 66 KWh. This does not include the daily "Basic Service" charge, which is a flat daily charge I would be paying anyway if I had an EV or not. Your company may do it differently? Not sure.

Using the $6.80 works out to $.026/mi or roughly half the cost of the Malibu. That's about right with the EPA "eMPG" estimates.

CORRECTION: I missed .08 buried in the bill so the actual incremental cost is .183/KWH! That works out to around $11.88 for 66KWH or $.049/mi.
 

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As a Bolt owner, I can tell you there are multiple spots where they cheapened out to save money in the interior. It is not something that is really a big deal to be honest.

I am assuming they can offer more discounts because of the credits and getting the cost of batteries down. I will say that you really need to check one out. For this kind of money, they are a no brainer for most.
 

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Dannyg: You have to account for the flat daily charge to get an accurate cost basis. I suspect it's much higher overall per kWh in Long Island.
 

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Are you sure you've got the right electricity cost? Here on Looooooooong Island, my bill says $.103 per KWh. That works out to $6.80 for 66 KWh. This does not include the daily "Basic Service" charge, which is a flat daily charge I would be paying anyway if I had an EV or not. Your company may do it differently? Not sure.

Using the $6.80 works out to $.026/mi or roughly half the cost of the Malibu. That's about right with the EPA "eMPG" estimates.
Yea, that kWh price seems really, really, really high. Our area has some of the highest rates in the nation and it's .16 kWh.
 

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Our area has some of the highest rates in the nation and it's .16 kWh.
Evansville and SW Indiana? Surprised that electricity rates are so high there. If I'm not mistaken, there are at least five major coal and natural gas fired power stations in that part of Indiana:

  • Gibson, 3.1 GW (largest coal powered plant in the U.S.)
  • Petersburg, 1.9 GW
  • Warrick, 0.8 GW
  • A.B. Brown, 0.7 GW
  • F.B. Culley, 0.4 GW
 
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