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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone familiar with these? Ran into a real estate agent who had one, she liked it with limits (it's not a Pacifica), and have noticed a couple on the road since then. Not exactly on my radar. Search indicates it's a fleet vehicle.

I see MikMak wrote it up a while back.

http://www.gminsidenews.com/forums/f128/gmi-drives-holden-captiva-5-2-4-6m-118778/

Medium spute around Sorento size. An Edmunds report says it's a bit barren and not so powerful with its 2.4/6A combo.
With a 19 gallon fuel tank and 3600 lbs it should cruise for a while in some reasonable comfort.
 

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I can't speak to the Captiva directly, but it's been here before as the 2008-2009 Saturn Vue. My wife and I have a 2009 Vue XR with the 3.6/A6 combo. She absolutely loves it. Good acceleration and acceptable fuel economy for the size. If we are really easy on the pedal, we can get 24-25 mpg highway. Around town only, it's about 17-18. Really our only complaint is that it is a bit narrow. I'm a bigger guy and my wife is on the smaller side, but when we both sit in the front seats, our shoulders are really very close. In the back seat, with a car seat and a booster seat for the kids, the "middle seat" has all of 6" of space back there rendering it completely useless. Minor complaint, but that's really all we have.
 
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My experience is also not with the Captiva, but its predecessor the second generation Saturn Vue, which is what the North American Chevrolet Captiva is, for all intents and purposes. (I was a Saturn Associate when the second gen Vue was launched)

In my opinion, the Captiva/Vue's 4 cylinder models do feel overwhelmed by the mass they have to move. The 4's simply have to work too hard to get the vehicle up to speed. This results in less than optimal fuel economy. The way to go is with the V6 combo, which makes the Captiva a very good alternative to the other small/mid size cuv's out there. However, I believe the V6 that was available in the Captiva was the 3.0, not the 3.6 that was available in the Vue XR, or the 3.5 that was available in the Vue XE AWD. It's not as powerful as the 3.6 off the line, but in normal driving most wouldn't notice the difference. The vehicles are pretty comfortable, and I loved the seating position in the Vue. I don't believe the Captivas were available with some top options like Nav, but I could be wrong on that.

My stepmother is seriously considering purchasing a GM Certified Captiva in the next couple months after her lease is up on her Ford Edge, with which she's had so-so luck. She's also considering a Vue as well, if the miles aren't too high.

:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
From what I've gleaned from the net, it seems they come only with the 2.4 nowadays.
Someone please prove me wrong, that is dumb but then:fall:
 

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From what iIve gleaned from the net, it seems they come only with the 2.4 nowadays.
Someone please prove me wrong, that is dumb but then:fall:
It's fleet only so it's not profitable to load them up with options and offer a bunch of variations. That's what the Equinox is for.

Honestly it was a good strategy so as to keep Equinox resale values up by not diluting the model with a bunch of fleet sales. Minimally facelift an older SUV and dump them on fleets while still turning a profit at low ATPs.
 
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They do indeed only come with the 2.4/6a these days. We bought a '14 because we weren't having much luck finding a low miles Equinox, apparently folks like them a lot and don't trade. Quite a few Captivas to choose from ranging from bare LS to LTZ. Ours is what I would call an LT2. We like that it had the sunroof, and leather that my wife wanted without most of the stuff in the Equinox LT2 package. It fits our wants perfectly.

The Equinox would definitely handle our grandkids in rear facing car seats better, but they only are that way for a short time and we don't haul them all that often. Trailer hitch was cheap and easy to install, lighting kit less so, but very high quality.

We drove from St Louis to Charleston, SC last July and never felt underpowered. Yes it shifts a lot in the mountains, and any 4 cyl is pretty annoying sound wise, but it did what we expected for the speeds we drove (28 mpg for the entire trip) and had plenty of power the few times we needed to pass on two lane.

They are all fleet vehicles, ours came from a small corporate fleet in upstate NY. Probably a salesman's car, 16K miles in less than a year. We would buy it again.
 

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From what iIve gleaned from the net, it seems they come only with the 2.4 nowadays.
Someone please prove me wrong, that is dumb but then:fall:
That's correct, Neanderthal. Starting in MY 2013, Captiva Sport was available only with the LEA 2.4L DOHC 4-cylinder SIDI engine and front-wheel drive. MY 2012 versions offered a V6 and AWD, but apparently that combination wasn't popular.

I've rented a few Captiva Sport models in the past couple years. They were decent all around and were E85 flex-fuel capable, but seat comfort could be better especially with cloth seats.
 
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From what iIve gleaned from the net, it seems they come only with the 2.4 nowadays.
Someone please prove me wrong, that is dumb but then:fall:
Or ancient VM Motori 2.2 diesel.

In Europe, the Captiva/Antara struggles - it's not competitive with Hyundai Santa Fe and Kia Sorento nor any of the more expensive mid-range SUVs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That's correct, Neanderthal. Starting in MY 2013, Captiva Sport was available only with the LEA 2.4L DOHC 4-cylinder SIDI engine and front-wheel drive. MY 2012 versions offered a V6 and AWD, but apparently that combination wasn't popular.

I've rented a few Captiva Sport models in the past couple years. They were decent all around and were E85 flex-fuel capable, but seat comfort could be better especially with cloth seats.
OK, that makes sense roy.

Like Pontiacs, stick shifts, and AWD, you don't need it if people won't pay for it.
 
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