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As an engineer, I base some of my speculation on the attached presentation. See slides 7-11.

GM did a great deal of work and analysis to make the XT5 stiffer, more crashworthy, yet 292 lbs lighter than the SRX. Why wouldn't this be a good design starting point? Also, isn't the XT5 Cadillac's best selling vehicle?

So the engineers can start with the XT5, eliminate the engine, transmission, fuel tank, etc., and have a basic shell to start from. Next they can try to integrate the battery pack and drive modules into the shell, and then add electrical components like cable runs, battery cooling system, HVAC, etc. Then they can do aero work, implement new features, modify the structure, and so forth.

Again, this just seems to me like the fastest and most efficient way to reach their goal.

I have a 2016 Chevy Volt, and in the first generation, the Volt was very new (and expensive). In the 2nd generation, they designed the Cruze and the Volt together, and this commonality helped reduce development and manufacturing cost.
 

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As an engineer, I base some of my speculation on the attached presentation. See slides 7-11.

GM did a great deal of work and analysis to make the XT5 stiffer, more crashworthy, yet 292 lbs lighter than the SRX. Why wouldn't this be a good design starting point? Also, isn't the XT5 Cadillac's best selling vehicle?

So the engineers can start with the XT5, eliminate the engine, transmission, fuel tank, etc., and have a basic shell to start from. Next they can try to integrate the battery pack and drive modules into the shell, and then add electrical components like cable runs, battery cooling system, HVAC, etc. Then they can do aero work, implement new features, modify the structure, and so forth.

Again, this just seems to me like the fastest and most efficient way to reach their goal.

I have a 2016 Chevy Volt, and in the first generation, the Volt was very new (and expensive). In the 2nd generation, they designed the Cruze and the Volt together, and this commonality helped reduce development and manufacturing cost.
However, isn't this on GM's new Ultium architecture? I'd think the similarities will be just because they are evolving the Art & Science, but keeping some styling cues.
 

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However, isn't this on GM's new Ultium architecture? I'd think the similarities will be just because they are evolving the Art & Science, but keeping some styling cues.
That's what I'm thinking along with maybe the size similarities involved if any. Also as an afterthought maybe they are going for some sameness from model to model in certain areas of these designs on purpose linking them all together as a "yeah, that's a Cadillac" kind of thing.
 

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As an engineer, I base some of my speculation on the attached presentation. See slides 7-11.

GM did a great deal of work and analysis to make the XT5 stiffer, more crashworthy, yet 292 lbs lighter than the SRX. Why wouldn't this be a good design starting point? Also, isn't the XT5 Cadillac's best selling vehicle?

So the engineers can start with the XT5, eliminate the engine, transmission, fuel tank, etc., and have a basic shell to start from. Next they can try to integrate the battery pack and drive modules into the shell, and then add electrical components like cable runs, battery cooling system, HVAC, etc. Then they can do aero work, implement new features, modify the structure, and so forth.

Again, this just seems to me like the fastest and most efficient way to reach their goal.

I have a 2016 Chevy Volt, and in the first generation, the Volt was very new (and expensive). In the 2nd generation, they designed the Cruze and the Volt together, and this commonality helped reduce development and manufacturing cost.
The XT5 is Cadillac's best selling car, but not because it's great at anything. It's about as mediocre as a midsize luxury crossover can possibly be. It's just Cadillac's best seller by chance because it's in the luxury market's most popular segment and it has a price advantage over most, if not all, of its competitors.

Being said, if I'm trying to build a world class product, I would look to the XT5 for nothing...if anything I'd look to it for not what to do when building a world class product.

The Lyriq will have a better dash to axle ratio, a faster rear roofline, and what appears to be a longer wheelbase...giving it a more, appropriate profile.
 

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Next they can try to integrate the battery pack and drive modules into the shell, and then add electrical components like cable runs, battery cooling system, HVAC, etc. Then they can do aero work, implement new features, modify the structure, and so forth.
It doesn't make sense to use the existing architecture for a radically new product. Lyriq is only the first model among a huge number EVs that GM will begin to produce within 3 years. And it is much easier and cheaper to do with a new electrical platform.
 

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This car was announced so long ago for no reason. I'm sure the competition appreciates the 2-3 year heads up.
 

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This car was announced so long ago for no reason. I'm sure the competition appreciates the 2-3 year heads up.
Meh. Every other car maker made an early announcement as well.
The difference is, they're already in the process of launching luxury EVs.
GM's using a purportedly superior battery architecture to underpin its EVs. That's the perceived advantage.

Whether or not Cadillac can leverage that AND add in all the bells and whistles, design, and high-end features needed for a luxury car is the other question.

For example, Lyriq is probably a competitor to the Audi eTron. Look at what they're offering and see where Cadillac needs to be.
 
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