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Ford F-150 Lightning EV Or Chevy Silverado EV?

  • Chevy Silverado EV

    Votes: 14 82.4%
  • Ford F-150 Lightning EV

    Votes: 3 17.6%
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, but the fact you got such a great deal is because sales were so bad; proving my point of lack of demand.....
Not really because my last vehicle was a Sierra Denali and I got that because it was a hell of a deal. When I got my Bolt, my salesman said it was by far the best deal he had done since I qualified for pretty much every possible incentive. Most people were paying at least twice what I am paying.

Had some reservations, like most, about owning an EV. But the savings are huge.
 

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Did you just prove my point?

As 'cool' as this and the Hummer are, at these prices?...........

GM is taking a very unique approach, the most expensive Hummer and the cheapest Silverado, do we think that was GM's original plan, or is it in reaction to Ford's F150 Lightning successful role-out?
Judging from the "Announcement" of the Silverado EV, the exact same Day as Order Banks Opened for the Ford Lightening, I would say GM is exactly 2 years behind (2 year wait for the Silverado EV) the current Trend, which is not a $130K Hummer. Oh sorry, with Crab Walking Hummer.
 

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Not really because my last vehicle was a Sierra Denali and I got that because it was a hell of a deal. When I got my Bolt, my salesman said it was by far the best deal he had done since I qualified for pretty much every possible incentive. Most people were paying at least twice what I am paying.

Had some reservations, like most, about owning an EV. But the savings are huge.
Hot Ticket Items, don't need Incentives. Proof is all around as we speak. Every F150 during Covid Shortage is selling without Incentives, Broncos are selling above MSRP in many intendances. Try to find a Super Duty @ MSRP.

A $175/month Lease on a Volt while it average depreciation is around $400/month on a Compact, tends to show where the Savings are coming from. If the Market was there, the ELR would still be in production. A Bolt would command MSRP without any discounts, The whole EV trend isn't ready for Prime Time, which is why there is a need for Tax Credits.

Just wait for the Northerners, like myself. to discover the 2nd week of -30F like we are going through right now. And nobodies EV's will stay charged, even Taxi Service is suffering to keep it's fleet mobile. A Fleet that has quadrupled since the ICE has been banned.
 

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Not really because my last vehicle was a Sierra Denali and I got that because it was a hell of a deal. When I got my Bolt, my salesman said it was by far the best deal he had done since I qualified for pretty much every possible incentive. Most people were paying at least twice what I am paying.

Had some reservations, like most, about owning an EV. But the savings are huge.
Sorry, this got overlooked in all the Silverado EV excitement.......

Let me make sure I've got this right?
1) You didn't get a good deal on your Bolt, because you got a hell of a deal on your Sierra Denali?
- But then you said "most people were paying twice what you were paying"
- So they were getting really bad deals, or was the salesmen just telling you that to make you feel good about trading in a Denali for a Compact EV that he'd been trying to sell for months?

Yes, you a saving a lot, and if you are only losing ~10% range in cold-winter weather, then you are really saving! 😉

FWIW, in your free-time Google search: Chevy Bolt $14,000 Discount

Happy New Year, enjoy your Bolt, if I actually drove somewhere most days, I probably would have looked into getting one, because you know me! 😁
 

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Sorry, this got overlooked in all the Silverado EV excitement.......

Let me make sure I've got this right?
1) You didn't get a good deal on your Bolt, because you got a hell of a deal on your Sierra Denali?
  • But then you said "most people were paying twice what you were paying"
  • So they were getting really bad deals, or was the salesmen just telling you that to make you feel good about trading in a Denali for a Compact EV that he'd been trying to sell for months?

Yes, you a saving a lot, and if you are only losing ~10% range in cold-winter weather, then you are really saving! 😉

FWIW, in your free-time Google search: Chevy Bolt $14,000 Discount

Happy New Year, enjoy your Bolt, if I actually drove somewhere most days, I probably would have looked into getting one, because you know me! 😁
No, sigh. You need to properly follow a conversation and this would work out much better for you. I am a deal buyer. My Denali, which I got before my Bolt, was leased because it was a great deal. I would lease most vehicles if the deal is right.

FYI, the Bolt on the lot was there for less than a month so they probably weren't too desperate to move it.
 

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I built a Lariat for fun without extended range. 72K and only has 230 miles of range. Pricing on my yet to finalized ordered base 2022 MCE Sierra Denali 4WD Shortbox with a 5.3L that will go 400 miles on a tank of petrol for approximately 65K is looking like a ‘value’ and that is just plain sad. IMHO these are except for the base easily 10K to 15K too high.

Holy smokes my XLT without extended range was 66K with cloth seats. No, thank you that is on the wrong side of crazy. The base looks like a deal until I realized it might be vinyl seats only!

I noticed they copied the base Pro trim from GMC too.
Actually, the other way around - GMC copied that from Ford. Ford announced the base "Pro" trim at Lightning's debut May 19th (2021), and GMC announced the Sierra's base trim would become "Pro" July 14th (2021).


I would buy the F-Series base model "Pro" $39,974 (No silly light on top of grille, that other road users would get annoyed with after night).

Chevrolet Silverado EV prototype is out on display today, hopefully, better things will come to those that wait.
You're obsessed with this idea that dim decorative running lights are somehow blinding people on the road, and I can't understand why.
 

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No, sigh. You need to properly follow a conversation and this would work out much better for you. I am a deal buyer. My Denali, which I got before my Bolt, was leased because it was a great deal. I would lease most vehicles if the deal is right.

FYI, the Bolt on the lot was there for less than a month so they probably weren't too desperate to move it.
Oh, no - I understand completely, you went from a Sierra Denali to a Chevy Bolt, and are bragging about how good of a deal you got and how much you are saving in gas!

What month did you get your Bolt and did you put a trailer-hitch on it, or does your lifestyle only require the utility of a Chevy Sonic?
 

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Then trucks must be the least desirable vehicles sold as they have, traditionally, the highest incentives out there.
Traditionally YES.

This is how it works.

A Company designs a Product to sell, Produces this product, marks a Price on the product, higher than the cost to produce said product, and sells the product for the profit.

Pretty simple right. When supply chain can keep up and demand can keep up. But what if Demand is lower than supply? Especially in Auto Union where the Company must pay it's Employees 80% of their wage weather they are producing product or sitting at home. Combat this with a Reduced price, before others in the market take more sales.

So Micro Chip Shortage equals Product Shortage, then it becomes a Sellers Market, no need to reduce price, it is better to make more profit from fewer units.

GM and Ram hare both already playing the Incentive Game, even when Product is Short??? WHY?

Silverado/Sierra Canada, currently have $1000 Stackable and 0.99% or $3000 nonstackable on remaining 2021's. Ram is even higher, F150 have 0.99% Only.
 

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Wonder how long I could stay warm if stuck on I95 for several days with a BEV
I detect an implicit assumption in many of the comments about the I-95 traffic jam that most vehicles had full fuel tanks when they entered the traffic jam. The forget that the freeway originates in Miami to the south and that number other Interstate Highways feed into it. There were vehicles in that traffic jam that were last refueled in Durham, NC and other location of similar distance from Washington, DC. Of course, there were also vehicles that had been refueled at a freeway exit north of Richmond.

How long you could keep your vehicle running to maintain your heat is determined by the fuel in your tank. I can estimate this using information that I learned some years ago during a brutal cold snap in Alaska. During that cold snap, a number of car owners kept their vehicles idling overnight to prevent freezing. The question was raised about the fuel consumption required to do this. The response was that it required 1 gallon of fuel to idle cars for 8 hours. This means that 24 hours of idling requires 3 gallons or 10 gallons will get you 80 hours.

What it all means is that if your tank is 1/4 full, then you are in pretty good shape as far as heat is concerned. However, a long-term traffic jam that you cannot escape will still cause serious problems as far as food, water, and personal needs are concerned.

For these new EVs beginning with the Ford F150 Lightning, their batteries have the capacity to power your home for three days. It takes a lot less energy to power a car or pickup truck than to power a home. Therefore, running out of power to heat your vehicle should not be a real concern unless your batteries are substantially depleted. As with an ICE, your real concerns are food, water, and personal needs.
 

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I detect an implicit assumption in many of the comments about the I-95 traffic jam that most vehicles had full fuel tanks when they entered the traffic jam. The forget that the freeway originates in Miami to the south and that number other Interstate Highways feed into it. There were vehicles in that traffic jam that were last refueled in Durham, NC and other location of similar distance from Washington, DC. Of course, there were also vehicles that had been refueled at a freeway exit north of Richmond.

How long you could keep your vehicle running to maintain your heat is determined by the fuel in your tank. I can estimate this using information that I learned some years ago during a brutal cold snap in Alaska. During that cold snap, a number of car owners kept their vehicles idling overnight to prevent freezing. The question was raised about the fuel consumption required to do this. The response was that it required 1 gallon of fuel to idle cars for 8 hours. This means that 24 hours of idling requires 3 gallons or 10 gallons will get you 80 hours.

What it all means is that if your tank is 1/4 full, then you are in pretty good shape as far as heat is concerned. However, a long-term traffic jam that you cannot escape will still cause serious problems as far as food, water, and personal needs are concerned.

For these new EVs beginning with the Ford F150 Lightning, their batteries have the capacity to power your home for three days. It takes a lot less energy to power a car or pickup truck than to power a home. Therefore, running out of power to heat your vehicle should not be a real concern unless your batteries are substantially depleted. As with an ICE, your real concerns are food, water, and personal needs.
That's what I heard out of an acquaintance of mine that the BEV ones were the ones getting shown on the TV as the ones in dire straits during this, but yeah either way, a BEV or an ICE vehicle with a battery charged at or near the top and a fuel tank the same would not put you in that sort of circumstance other than the discomfort of the situation and going stir crazy so to speak. Now, about all those yellow and brown stuff spots in the in the snow...... :D
 

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I detect an implicit assumption in many of the comments about the I-95 traffic jam that most vehicles had full fuel tanks when they entered the traffic jam. The forget that the freeway originates in Miami to the south and that number other Interstate Highways feed into it. There were vehicles in that traffic jam that were last refueled in Durham, NC and other location of similar distance from Washington, DC. Of course, there were also vehicles that had been refueled at a freeway exit north of Richmond.

How long you could keep your vehicle running to maintain your heat is determined by the fuel in your tank. I can estimate this using information that I learned some years ago during a brutal cold snap in Alaska. During that cold snap, a number of car owners kept their vehicles idling overnight to prevent freezing. The question was raised about the fuel consumption required to do this. The response was that it required 1 gallon of fuel to idle cars for 8 hours. This means that 24 hours of idling requires 3 gallons or 10 gallons will get you 80 hours.

What it all means is that if your tank is 1/4 full, then you are in pretty good shape as far as heat is concerned. However, a long-term traffic jam that you cannot escape will still cause serious problems as far as food, water, and personal needs are concerned.

For these new EVs beginning with the Ford F150 Lightning, their batteries have the capacity to power your home for three days. It takes a lot less energy to power a car or pickup truck than to power a home. Therefore, running out of power to heat your vehicle should not be a real concern unless your batteries are substantially depleted. As with an ICE, your real concerns are food, water, and personal needs.
That was a lot of words to say............... you don't know!
 

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Heating or cooling your car can be done much longer with ICE, assuming both options are maxed. That said, if one were traveling distance in bad weather, carrying a 5 gal cannister or two, gives you far more additional time as well with ICE. But you can't do the same with BEV.
You mean in EV you can't take along or store an extra battery or charge with you? :rolleyes: ;) :D
 

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I detect an implicit assumption in many of the comments about the I-95 traffic jam that most vehicles had full fuel tanks when they entered the traffic jam. The forget that the freeway originates in Miami to the south and that number other Interstate Highways feed into it. There were vehicles in that traffic jam that were last refueled in Durham, NC and other location of similar distance from Washington, DC. Of course, there were also vehicles that had been refueled at a freeway exit north of Richmond.

How long you could keep your vehicle running to maintain your heat is determined by the fuel in your tank. I can estimate this using information that I learned some years ago during a brutal cold snap in Alaska. During that cold snap, a number of car owners kept their vehicles idling overnight to prevent freezing. The question was raised about the fuel consumption required to do this. The response was that it required 1 gallon of fuel to idle cars for 8 hours. This means that 24 hours of idling requires 3 gallons or 10 gallons will get you 80 hours.

What it all means is that if your tank is 1/4 full, then you are in pretty good shape as far as heat is concerned. However, a long-term traffic jam that you cannot escape will still cause serious problems as far as food, water, and personal needs are concerned.

For these new EVs beginning with the Ford F150 Lightning, their batteries have the capacity to power your home for three days. It takes a lot less energy to power a car or pickup truck than to power a home. Therefore, running out of power to heat your vehicle should not be a real concern unless your batteries are substantially depleted. As with an ICE, your real concerns are food, water, and personal needs.
The GTO I used to own switched to gallons per hour when idling and it idled at 3/4 gallon per hour so I don’t believe any cars can idle for 8 hours on one gallon. Small generators maybe but not a car.

A buddy of mine has a Tesla and it has a camp mode that keeps the heat at a reasonable level and keeps the seat heater on and it takes 2% battery per hour so I don’t believe EV’s are any more of an issue than ICE cars while being stranded.
 

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Heating or cooling your car can be done much longer with ICE, assuming both options are maxed. That said, if one were traveling distance in bad weather, carrying a 5 gal cannister or two, gives you far more additional time as well with ICE. But you can't do the same with BEV.
Getting a "fast charge" with a can of gas could be done rather easily too!
(Guy on a ATV with a couple racks of cans?)

The GTO I used to own switched to gallons per hour when idling and it idled at 3/4 gallon per hour so I don’t believe any cars can idle for 8 hours on one gallon. Small generators maybe but not a car.

A buddy of mine has a Tesla and it has a camp mode that keeps the heat at a reasonable level and keeps the seat heater on and it takes 2% battery per hour so I don’t believe EV’s are any more of an issue than ICE cars while being stranded.
All depends on where/when you got stranded........
- Did you just fill-up/re-charge at the last exit, or were you stopping at the next exit to fill-up/re-charge?
 
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Getting a "fast charge" with a can of gas could be done rather easily too!
(Guy on a ATV with a couple racks of cans?)



All depends on where/when you got stranded........
- Did you just fill-up/re-charge at the last exit, or were you stopping at the next exit to fill-up/re-charge?
It doesn’t really matter because that same scenario works with ICE. The point is both forms of propulsion will last similar hours on similar level of fuel. I honestly would have thought an EV would have died quicker but that doesn’t appear to be the case at all.

I was stuck in one of these last year in St. Louis for the first time in my life and it was so packed with traffic everywhere no rescue vehicles or anything else was out and about. It was 8 hours for me but a lot of people were stuck for 12 hours. The next morning when rush hour was gone people were getting rescued with dead cars and all of the cars were towed since the people were long gone to safety.
 

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OK, let me try again...........

It doesn’t really matter because that same scenario works with ICE. The point is both forms of propulsion will last similar hours on similar level of fuel. I honestly would have thought an EV would have died quicker but that doesn’t appear to be the case at all.
"All depends on where/when you got stranded"........

Did you just fill-up/re-charge at the last exit
OR...............
Were you stopping at the next exit to fill-up/re-charge?
(because you were almost out of gas or your battery was almost dead)

I was stuck in one of these last year in St. Louis for the first time in my life and it was so packed with traffic everywhere no rescue vehicles or anything else was out and about. It was 8 hours for me but a lot of people were stuck for 12 hours. The next morning when rush hour was gone people were getting rescued with dead cars and all of the cars were towed since the people were long gone to safety.
Ugh...... OK, it took you 8 hours to get out, it took others up to 12 hours to get out.............
  • What about the cars 100 or 200 yards from an exit, where they stuck 8 hours or 12 hours or maybe a couple hours or less? Is it impossible that they got 3rd party assistance?
  • The conditions slow everything down, but if you had a railroad crossing with a 10 mile back-up, the cars in the front are moving 15-20-30 minutes sooner than the ones at the end.

OK, that's it - I know you'll understand what I'm saying "now". Happy New Year!
 
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