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Here PDL AE rant of the week www.autoextremist.com

I am sitting here awash in the unending platitudes roiling the Internet about the new GT version of the Ford Mach-E crossover. As best as I can determine, judging by the gushing praise being slathered on Ford’s electric crossover, it is the greatest thing since sliced bread, and that doesn’t even begin to cover the over-the-top verbiage being assigned to the styling-challenged conveyance.
It’s hard to sort the wheat from the chaff in this instance, meaning, it’s hard to determine if the commentators in question are just enamored with the first blush of wheeling an EV around, or if they are able to put the usability and performance in perspective with the cost.
One guy who has had plenty of exposure to EVs, certainly enough to put things in perspective, is Mark Phelan from our local Detroit Free Press. In reading his initial review of the $62,185 GT version and the $68,500 Performance version – the one that adds a cool $5,000 for all the tricks – Phelan had this to say:
“The EPA rates the GT at 270 miles on a charge, the GT Performance at 260.
A lot of people pretend the Mach-E GT only competes with electric SUVs like the Tesla X and Audi E-tron. By those standards, its price, power and performance clearly come out on top. But the Mach-E doesn’t live in a fantasy land where everybody drives EVs. Not yet anyway. It also needs to win buyers from sporty gasoline-powered midsize SUVs.
It still pencils out well for performance and value, but like many SUVs, charging time remains a potential issue. Most EV owners do 65%-85% of their charging at home, according to Ford’s data. That’s a clear win for an electric vehicle — owners start every day with a full battery, based on EPA estimates of 10.1 hours charging time at 240 volts.”

Got it, that pretty much sums up the positives – and the negatives – for EVs. But then Phelan’s comments get really interesting:
“The Mach-E’s competitiveness on long highway drives remains an open question, though. Independent tests cite 47-52 minutes to charge to 80% at a 150 kW (400v) DC charger. That’s slower than the best competitors, leaving room for improvement.”
And therein lies the heart of the matter for the transition to EVs in this country. “Leaving room for improvement” is code for we’re not there yet. As in, it’s one thing to operate an EV in the city and in urban environments. I know, I had one – a Chevrolet Bolt EV – and it was certainly capable, competent and unexpectedly, really fun to drive. And I see no compelling reason why an EV wouldn’t work for most motorists for their typical driving needs.
But – and there is a very large “but” in this case – it’s one thing to boast of driving range because that seems to be settling in at over 300 miles on average for most EVs from here on out. And that’s fine, because for most people in urban areas, where they can charge overnight, that should be plenty of range.
But what about 45 minutes to an hour (or more) for a charge on the road, where there’s an added complication looming if the charging stations are occupied, or for some reason not working at the time?
 

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Sounds like Autoextremist finally realized - as anyone who owns a battery electric vehicle inevitably will - that there's a red light at the intersection of Electric Avenue and Easy Street? :unsure:
 

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Ha. He states the same things I and others here have been saying about EV's. They may be fine in the city to some extent, but taking one on a cross state or cross country jaunt will most likely cramp your style. ;)
 

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This is a lot of hot air about nothing, really.

Most households that have an EV have an ICE vehicle too (as I've said in that past, IMO, that's the right way to do "hybrid"). If charging times really worry you, take the ICE on road trips. That means EVs can get close to 50% of the market before this is even an issue at all. That gives plenty of time for charging speeds to get better.

PDL is also writing this based on a vehicle with 150kW DC charging rate, which is not even close to the best even today., much less in the future. I've done quite a few road trips in an EV and it's not nearly as bad as people assume it to be. Yeah, EVs aren't for you (yet) if you drive long distances regularly and it'll slow you down if you are the type who likes to get to the destination ASAP but most people who take road trips are looking to enjoy the drive. Stopping every 3-4 hours is quite natural for most people who want to enjoy a road trip.

When I don't want to have to stop is when I'm rushing to drop the kid off and get in to work in the morning. That's exactly when I often had to stop for gas in my previous vehicles. That's not something I have had to worry about with the EV. So, yeah, it's definitely different but not necessarily worse (at least for some of us).
 

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The new Hyundai Ioniq 5 and Kia EV6 can charge at peak rate of 225 kW

The Lucid Air will debut at 300 kW and will eventually move up to 325-340 kW as Lucid observes real world data.

300 miles of range in less than 7 minutes for full sized electric pickups isn't that far away.
 

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Did he sell the Bolt? He spoke of it in past tense.

As noted above, kind of a pointless article when we know battery tech is rapidly improving. If this is all we had and ICE was outlawed today, then yes, it's a problem. But it isn't.

I like the styling of this electric Mustang.
 

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Is anybody pretending that current EVs are 100% ready for prime time for 100% of consumers? Yes, charging on road trips can be inconvenient, but not having to fill up most of the time because you drive locally and charge overnight is offsetting to some degree, what degree depends upon your use case. Then there is the no maintenance aspect that ICE cannot match. It's a small inconvenience, but an inconvenience all the same.

I don't think that even Tesla is pretending they're the be all, end all , for everyone. To me the biggest downside to EVs is how they're going to put ICE out of business. Having the option of a fully EV Mustang would be great, knowing that not to far down the road it's going to be the only choice is what bothers me.
 

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I don’t care about the current range or charge times because I will have at least one ICE vehicle for more than ten years to fall back on. I also wish I had time to blow driving cross country. Anything more than 300 miles and I’m flying.

I do care about the soul sucking nature of them. I hope that improves quicker than the range/charging issues. It probably won’t though since most of the soul sucking comes from weight and the lack of prudent sounds.
 

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There’s always the option of a hybrid or PHEV for those who want a blend of efficient gasoline power and perhaps some electric range.
 
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